JMJ
+ PARISH SCHEDULE FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 27TH, 2018 +

SUNDAY, MAY 27 [THE MOST HOLY TRINITY]:
8:00 am – Eugene Wilt Family – int. Ron & Monica Scherman
10:30 am – Health & Blessings for Anthony Filipi – int. Elias Filipi
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F.)
MONDAY, MAY 28 : Memorial Day Mass at Cemetry
9:00 am + Veterans & deceased members of our Parish
TUESDAY, MAY 29 [St. Camillus and St. Peregrine Novena]:
5:30 pm – Health & Blessings for Michael Ahearn
WEDNESDAY, MAY 30 [St. Jude Novena]:
5:30 pm – Andy Bednar – int. Elias Filipi
THURSDAY, MAY 31 [Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary]:
5:30 pm – Living & Departed members of the Fritz & Klepacki Family – int. Family
FIRST FRIDAY, JUNE 1 [St Justin]:
Recitation of the Litany to the Sacred Heart of Jesus will follow Mass
5:30 pm – Joseph Hazelrigg – int. Elias Filipi
FIRST SATURDAY, JUNE 2 [Ss. Marcellinus and Peter/Bl. Sadok & Companions]:
The Holy Rosary will be recited before Mass, Exposition of the
Blessed Sacrament, Litany of Loreto and Benediction following Mass
8:00 am – Health & Blessings for Sarah & Ken Garrepy & Children – int. Pelc Family
4:00 pm – Jim Hazelrigg – int. Elias Filipi
6:00 pm (Spanish) – For our Parish and Parishioners
CORPUS CHRISTI SUNDAY, JUNE 3 [THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF JESUS CHRIST]:
8:00 am¬¬ – Fr. Charles Jan DiMascola – int. Fritz Family
10:30 am – Fr. Charles Jan DiMascola – int. Joan Richotte

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THE ANNUAL MASS FOR VETERANS AND THE DEPARTED of the parish will take place at our Cemetery at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, Memorial Day, May 28th. All are invited to honor the veterans and our departed friends and relatives. Everyone is encouraged to bring lawn chairs. In the event of inclement weather the Mass will be held in the church.

THE NOVENA TO ST. JUDE is celebrated every Wednesday at the 5:30 p.m. Mass and all are welcome to attend.

 

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THURSDAY, MAY 31st is the Feast of the Visitation of Our Lady focusing on the charity of Mary and the recognition by St. Elizabeth and St. John the Baptist of Mary as the Mother of God.

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FRIDAY, JUNE 1st IS THE FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH in honor of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. The Mass will be offered at 5:30 p.m. followed by Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, the Litany to the Sacred Heart and Benediction. Confessions will take place before the Mass.

Image result for free pictures of St JustinFRIDAY, JUNE 1st is the Feast of St. Justin the Martyr. St. Justin was a layman and a philosopher who gives us one of the earliest descriptions of the Mass following Apostolic times. St. Justin is the patron of philosophers and will be remembered at the 5:30 p.m. Mass.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd IS THE FIRST SATURDAY OF THE MONTH which we celebrate in honor of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Confessions will begin at 7:30 a.m. Mass in honor of Our Lady will take place at 8:00 a.m. The Holy Rosary will be prayed prior to the Mass. Following the Mass will be Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, Litany of Loreto and Benediction.

See the source imageSATURDAY, JUNE 2nd is the Feast of the Martyrs Marcellinus and Peter, early Christian Priests who were beheaded for their Faith. They will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m. These two martyrs were known for their apostolic zeal, charity and courage to the very last.

THE WEEKLY PRO-LIFE NOVENA is offered every Saturday before the 8:00 a.m. Mass. All are invited to come and beg God for an end to the terrifying evil which is destroying our nation.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Carol Kostecki for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish. We thank you for this holy work of power and love.
THE ST JOHN PAUL II YOUTH GROUP will be attending the Steubenville East Youth Conference, July 13-15, in Lowell, MA. The conference is open to current 8th graders through graduating seniors. Each year around 30 youth from the area participate in this chance to grow in their faith. For more information, contact Ed or Suzi Cottrill at 413-772-6062 or stjpiiyouthgroup@gmail.com.

GIANT PARISH TAG SALE – It is time to clean out your attics and cellars and prepare for our annual giant tag sale which will take place this year on Saturday, June 30th from 9:00 – 1:00 on the church grounds. Please drop off tag sale items at the rectory garage. If you have large pieces of furniture and need help, call the rectory. PLEASE NO televisions, computers, printers, mattresses, clothing or books. Please call Shirley Webb at 773-7202 if you have any questions.

PLEASE JOIN US on Sunday, May 27th, in the undercroft after the 10:30 a.m. Mass for a Special Celebration for FR. SEAN’S 10th ANNIVERSARY OF ORDINATION. This will be a simple reception in his honor with hors d’oeuvres, deserts, and cake! Please come by and say thank you to Fr. Sean for his Priesthood. There is a sign-up sheet in the vestibule for anyone who would like to make an hors d’oeuvre or desert; items may be brought to the undercroft any time after 9:00 on May 27th.

PLEASE DON’T FORGET OUR GROCERIES for the Poor Project! Many people who are having a hard time come to the Rectory for help. Please help us to help them. It is a sad and heartbreaking thing to turn someone away when we run out of groceries! Any non-perishable items that you can spare will be greatly appreciated – canned hams, tuna fish, peanut butter, baked beans, dry milk, canned soups and stews, jam, crackers, juices, etc. Please leave them in the front vestibule of the church.

THE NEXT COMMUNITY MEAL WILL TAKE PLACE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 30TH! There will be a sign up sheet and pans available in the front vestibule by the beginning of May. Please contact Cathy Becklo with any questions, at acbecklo@comcast.net. We look forward to another successful dinner without a snowstorm getting in the way! God bless all the hearts and hands that make this a great program!

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THE SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION will be administered in our parish on Sunday, June 10th, 2018, at the 10:30 a.m. Mass by Msgr. Ronald G. Yargeau. Parish societies will gather before the Mass to escort the Confrimandi and Msgr. into church.

Why Do We Believe in the Trinity?
Fr. Roger Landry

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We believe in the Blessed Trinity because we believe in Jesus, Who revealed the Trinity. God had prepared the Jews not only to welcome the Messiah, but to recognize through revelation what philosophers like Aristotle achieved through reason: that there is a God and there can only be one God.
Moses said to the Jews, “Acknowledge today and take to heart that the Lord is God in heaven above and on the earth beneath; there is no other but to believe in God Who is the only God.” When the Messiah finally came, He revealed a huge mystery that went far beyond what the Jews were expecting: that the one God in Whom they believe is not solitary, but a unity, a communion of three persons, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and that the Messiah is the Son.
He told them explicitly that the Father and He are one (Jn 10:30). He told them that He and the Father would send the Holy Spirit (Jn 14:26, Jn 15:26). And when He sent them out to baptize in the name of God, He didn’t give them instructions to baptize in the “names” of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit — as if they were three different gods — but in the “name,” for they are fundamentally a union of three persons. This is what the term Trinity means. It was devised by the early Church apologist Tertullian around the year 200 from the Latin words “unitas” and “trinus,” literally “unity” and “three.” It signifies that there is a unity of three persons in one God.
Since the beginning of the Church, theologians have spent their lives trying to penetrate this mystery and explain it to others. St. Patrick used the image of a three-leaf clover. St. Augustine used the image of the mind, with memory, reason and will. More recent minds have used the image of H20, which can exist as ice, water, or steam. But none of these analogies — though interesting and somewhat helpful — do justice to the reality of the mystery of how three persons can exist in the one God.
When St. Augustine was in the middle of his voluminous and classic study of the Blessed Trinity, he took a walk along the beach in northern Africa to try to clear his head and pray. He saw a young girl repeatedly filling a scallop shell with sea water and emptying it into a hole she had dug in the sand. “What are you doing?” Augustine tenderly asked. “I’m trying to empty the sea into this hole,” the child replied. “How do you think that with a little shell,” Augustine retorted, “you can possibly empty this immense ocean into a tiny hole?” The little girl countered, “And how do you, with your small head, think you can comprehend the immensity of God?” As soon as the girl said this, she disappeared, convincing Augustine that she had been an angel sent to teach him an important lesson: No matter how gifted God had made him, he would never be able to comprehend fully the mystery of the Trinity.
This, of course, does not mean we cannot understand anything. If we want to get to the heart of the mystery of the Trinity, we can turn to the most theological of the Apostles, who meditated deeply on all that Jesus had revealed and, inspired by the Holy Spirit, said simply and synthetically, “God is love” (1 Jn 4:16). For God to be love, He has to love someone. None of us can love in a vacuum; there must always be an object of our love. Who is the object of God’s love? It cannot be man, or the created world, or the universe, because all of these existed in time and God is eternal and therefore existed before time.
It’s also impossible to say that God merely loved Himself in a solitary way, because this would not really be love but a form of egotism and narcissism. For God to be love, there needed to be an eternal relationship of love, with one who loves, one who is loved, and the love that unites them. This is what exists in the Blessed Trinity: The Father loved His image, the Son, so much that their mutual and eternal love “spirated” or “generated” the Holy Spirit. They exist in a communion of love. The three persons of the Blessed Trinity are united in absolutely everything except, as the early Church councils said, their “relations of origin,” what it means to be Father, what it means to be Son of the Father, and what it means to proceed from the Father and the Son.
These theological insights about the blessed Trinity may seem theoretical, but they become highly practical when we reflect on the fact that we have been made in the image and likeness of God and called to communion with God. To be in the image and likeness of God means to be created in the image and likeness of a communion of persons in love. Our belief in the Trinity — the central teaching of the Catholic faith — has given the Church the deepest understanding available to human beings of the nature of man, the meaning of human life, and what it means to love.

HOLY HOUR AND MINI RETREAT – Join us before the Blessed Sacrament for the Holy Hour and Mini Retreat of the Guard of Honor of the Sacred Heart. The Holy Hour is every Thursday and the Mini Retreat is the last Thursday of every month in our church following the 5:30 p.m. Mass from 6:15 – 7:15 p.m. with our Pastor, Fr. Séan O’Mannion, National Director of the Guard of Honor – USA.

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments! Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

Ecce ancilla Domini: Music in the Sacred Liturgy
Part Third: The Sung Mass: Ordinary of the Mass
In the first installment of this series we discussed St. Pius X’s Motu Proprio Tra le sollecitudini (the document upon which all subsequent Magisterial teaching on Sacred Music is based), and coalesced his teaching into the following bullet-points:
• Sacred Music is complementary to the liturgy, it is not, therefore, an extraneous addition to fill time;
• It is to contribute to the decorum and splendor of the liturgy, that is, to the reverence and sacrality of the liturgy, and in this way fulfil its aim of the sanctification and edification of the faithful—not (N.B.) their entertainment;
• Its principal function is the proclamation of the liturgical texts themselves, not merely religious ones;
• The qualities it should possess are sanctity, goodness of form, and universality (or catholicity, if you will).
We then discussed the characteristics of Sacred Music, sanctity, goodness of form, and universality in greater depth, and how these are exemplified in the Gregorian Chant.
I had briefly touched on the idea that the chant is native to the Roman Liturgy, and this is because unlike vernacular hymns, motets, or anthems, they proclaim a liturgical text, not merely a religious one. Also, it is interesting to note that it seems that many of the Gregorian Chants appear to be descended directly from use in the Jewish Temple worship. Abraham Z. Idelsohn in his Thesaurus of Hebrew Oriental Melodies and Jewish Music in its Historical Development, recorded the music of Jewish congregations in Yemen and Babylonia, who are presumed to have been cut off from the rest of the Jewish world since the destruction of the Second Temple, and who seem to preserve a more ancient Jewish liturgical music. In The Sacred Bridge, Eric Werner looks in greater detail at the correspondence between Jewish and Christian liturgical music, and a number of striking similarities emerge.
For example, a certain Yemenite psalm-tone matches almost exactly with not only a Gregorian psalm tone (specifically mode 1, ending f,), but also with the Gregorian melody used for the chanting of the Lamentations of Jeremiah at Matins (Tenebrae) during Holy Week:

From Idelsohn, Jewish Music, pg. 63, #9; and Liber Usualis, tone 1f, (Desclee, 1961), pg. 113

From Liber Usualis, Lamentations of Jeremiah, (Desclee, 1961), pg.
There is also a striking similarity between the Yemenite melody for the Eulogy of the Haftara and the Gregorian melody of the Tracts which traditionally replace the Alleluia and its Verse during Lent.
This evidence suggests that the Music of the Mass, namely the Gregorian Chant, is as ancient as the Mass itself, taking as its basis the liturgical worship of both the Temple and the Synagogue of the first centuries A.D. It is also important to note that all of this music, both Jewish and Christian, is setting texts from the Psalms or other books of Sacred Scripture, but more will be said about that later. Suffice to say that given such a pedigree, the native and complimentary music of the sacred liturgy (c.f. Tra le sollecitudini, et al.) should not be dismissed lightly in favor of other kinds of music. Having laid this groundwork, I would like to move to just what exactly the sung portions of the Mass are.
Briefly, the sung portions of the Mass can be divided up into two groups based on their texts, since, after all, the proclamation of the liturgical texts is the primary role of Sacred Music: namely, those texts which stay constant at each Mass, that is they are Ordinary; and those which change daily, that is they are Proper. We will begin today with the Ordinary of the Mass.
The Ordinary Parts of the Mass can also be broken down into two sub-categories: the Order of Mass and the chants of the Kyriale, which are also called Ordinary of the Mass.
The chants of the Order of Mass are by far the most simple, they are the various dialogues, such as the “The Lord be with you”, and its response “And with your spirit”, as well as some more complicated pieces like the Pater Noster (our Father), and, in the Novus Ordo, the Mystery of Faith.
Traditionally there have been several tones for these chants based on usage: the Ferial Tone (for weekdays—liturgically called Ferias—and Requiem (Funeral) Masses), the Festal Tone (for Feasts or more festive occasions in general), and the Solemn Tone (for Solemn Mass, regardless of the rank of day), however this distinction has always been very loosely applied at various times and in various places, and it was even common for these to be recited recto tono, that is “on the reciting tone”, or on one note. These texts do not change and are found in every Mass every day, and because of the simplicity and repetition of the music, are very easy for even the most untrained singers in a congregation to join in with. It is most likely these parts of the Mass, which are sadly rarely sung, which the Fathers of the Second Vatican Council had in mind when they said that the people should be taught “to say or sing together … those parts of the Mass which pertain to them”.
The chants of the Ordinary of the Mass or Chants of the Kyriale set to music the Kyrie (Lord have mercy), Gloria (Glory to God), Credo (Creed), Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy), and Agnus Dei (Lamb of God). These chants tend to be more complex, and are often sung in alternation between the cantor(s) or schola cantorum (choir) and the people, though sometimes they are sung by the people together. I should note here that when I refer to the cantor, I am referring to that person in their liturgical role, as a singer or singers, who intone certain liturgical texts, rather than simply a soloist or song-leader.
Unlike the chants for the Order of Mass, the chants of the Kyriale have always been more varied, with different settings suggested for different days, seasons, and feasts, e.g. a Mass for Eastertide, a Mass for Weekdays during the Season of the Year (or Ordinary Time), a Mass for Sundays of Advent and Lent, a Mass for Feasts of the Blessed Virgin, etc.
And while throughout the history there has been a variety in assignment, many of the same settings are found through the manuscripts of the Middle Ages (the earliest written sources we have). That is to say, the Kyrie assigned for Feasts of Apostles in modern Roman books (Mass IV), could be found assigned for, say, Christmastide in the books of the Diocese of Paris, or for Sundays after Pentecost in the Diocese of Canterbury, so the assignment of parts of Ordinaries to certain days has really been a matter of local custom. Even today, the preface of the Kyriale Romanum explicitly says that the assignment of Masses to particular seasons and feasts, and even the grouping of various parts together, is really a matter only of convenience, and that choirmasters are free to combine any chants together: e.g. Kyrie XI with Gloria XV, Sanctus VIII, and Agnus IV.
It is important to note, however, that while the people may join in singing the Ordinary of the Mass, there is no requirement that they must. This means, too, that the choir may sing the Ordinary of the Mass alone, either in a Chant setting, or more commonly, in a through-composed setting. We have done this on occasion, either a complete Mass (such as the Schubert Mass in G last November) or a single movement (such as the Kyrie from William Byrd’s Mass for Three Voices, which is sung every so often in place of a Gregorian Kyrie).
Next week, we will discuss the Proper of the Mass.
Pastoral Note:
What I, as Director of Music, have attempted to do here at Our Lady of Czestochowa, is to establish a program of Gregorian Ordinaries which can be sung by the Congregation. While there is some variety between the Masses each weekend, from the simplest at the Saturday evening Mass to the most complex at the 10:30 a.m. “High Mass” on Sunday morning, I hope to achieve a certain amount of stability. After slowly introducing new sections of the Ordinary during the past 10 years, I feel that we have arrived at a point where we can musically differentiate between the Seasons of the Liturgical Year.
My intention is to use four Mass settings on Sundays at the 10:30 Mass: 1) for Advent & Lent; 2) for Christmas, Easter, and Solemnities; 3) for Ordinary Time during Autumn & Winter; 4) for Ordinary Time during the Summer. There is one Mass setting for 4:00 Masses through the entire year. There are also three settings for Weekday Masses: 1) for Advent & Lent; 2) for Christmas, Easter, and Feasts; 3) for Ordinary Time. There is also a Mass setting for Masses for the Dead (Funerals, All Souls’, etc.). Since this has been established, there will be no new parts of the Mass introduced to be sung by the people—however, this does not preclude certain sections being sung by the choir alone, of course, but he congregation will not be expected sing them. (The Mass setting(s) used at the Sunday 8:00 Mass are at the discretion of Mr. Heath who directs the St. Gregory Choir at that Mass.) While this may seem like a lot, there is actually a great deal of overlap between these composite settings, for example: the same Sanctus & Agnus Dei are used during Advent & Lent and during Ordinary Time in Autumn & Winter, etc.
~ Henry Gaida, Director of Music
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THE KNIGHTS & LADIES OF ST. PETER CLAVER will hold their First Annual Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, October 27th, 2018, at the Bishop Marshall Center at St. Michael’s Cathedral. If anyone would like to rent a table, please call Lady Joy Danita Allen at 413-204-1553. The deadline for table rentals is October 1st—Don’t wait ‘til the last minute!

THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL DIOCESAN-WIDE EUCHARISTIC ROSARY PROCESSION will take place on Sunday, June 3rd, 2018, (rain or shine) at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish at 99 King St. in Northampton, from 1-4 P.M., beginning with a talk given by Fr. Chris Alar, MIC, director of The Marian Helper Center, in Stockbridge, who will speak on “The Call to Holiness Through Divine Mercy, for the Family, the Domestic Church”. During his talk, there will be priests available for the Sacrament of Confession. At 2:00 P.M., we will begin our prayerful event with a Consecration of the Family to the Divine Mercy, followed by a Rosary Procession through downtown Northampton, returning to the church for the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, with a reception to follow. For more information, contact George or Brenda at (413) 221-4372
ST. ANTHONY LEBANESE FESTIVAL St. Anthony Maronite Catholic Church located at 375 Island Pond Road, Springfield, MA 01108 announces the date for the St. Anthony Lebanese Festival ~ Saturday, June 2, 2018 from 11:00 a.m – 11:00 p.m. Highlights of the day will include: Arabic and American food, desserts and beverages, Hookah station, Entertainment, Heritage display and handouts, Children’s games and activities, Opportunity raffles. More information will be posted and updated on: http://www.saintanthonyschurch.org/ Come and Experience Lebanese Hospitality! SAVE the DATE!

OFFICE OF VOCATIONS: God, the Father, Creator. God the Son, Redeemer. God the Holy Spirit, Sanctifier. When we “go out to make disciples of all nations”, we have a lot to tell! God is present everywhere. Would you be willing to proclaim the truth of God’s love and presence in your life as a priest or religious? If so, email Fr. Matt or Fr. Michael: vocations@diospringfield.org and/or visit our website: http://www.myvocation.com.

AS OUR GARDENS burst into bloom, please remember the altars in our church. All flowers are gladly accepted to decorate our altars. Please let Mary Kobera know what you have and when you will be bringing them so she can arrange the altars to glorify God and beautify the Mass.

HOLY HOUR FOR THE SICK AND DYING – A Holy Hour is being observed each Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. in the Adoration Chapel at Blessed Sacrament Church in Greenfield. Included are the singing of hymns, recitation of the Rosary, and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy for the Sick and the Dying. The hour concludes with Benediction. If you know of someone who is ailing and in need of special graces and prayer, please be encouraged to come and spend an hour for his/her intention. All are welcome.

FINANCE COUNCIL NOTES: Total natural gas and heating oil expenses from 7/1/2017 through 4/30/2018: $16,494. Total fuel collections 7/1/2017 through 4/30/2018: $$7,752.

TWO PILGRIMAGES TO WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES – The World Meeting of Families will be held in Dublin, Ireland from August 21-26, 2018. Two great pilgrimages (8 or 12 day) are planned which include daily Mass and visits to numerous shrines (Knock, St. Peter, Nat’l. Shrine to St. Oliver Plunkett, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, St. Valentine, Venerable Matt Talbot, Tomb of Venerable John Sullivan, depending on which pilgrimage you choose) and many places of interest. For more information contact Grand View Tours at (610-361-7979), visit http://www.catholicsindublin.com, or contact Fr. Jonathan Reardon at Holy Family Parish in So. Deerfield (665-3254).
THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries. They will be offered as follows and you may attend the Masses here in our church as the Missionaries offer the Masses in their churches:

SUNDAY, MAY 27: 8:00 – Most Holy Trinity Community – int. Elizabeth Guedez
SUNDAY, MAY 27: 10:30 + Joseph & Anna Galvis – int. Family
MONDAY, MAY 28: – Grace & Blessings for Michael William Ahearn – int. Fritz Family
TUESDAY, MAY 29: + Mary Malley – int. Daughter, Susan
WEDNESDAY, MAY 30: + Frank Malley – int. Daughter, Susan
THURSDAY, MAY 31: + John Malley – int. Sister, Susan
FRIDAY, JUNE 1: – Health & Blessings for Mary Ellen Malley – int. Sister, Susan

PLEASE NOTE: The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help the Missionaries who often times receive very little help. It also helps the people where the Masses are offered. Bóg wam zapłać!

HOLY HOUR FOR VOCATIONS Please come to a Holy Hour for Vocations on the second Sunday of every month at 7:00 p.m. in the Franklin County Adoration Chapel in Greenfield. Join us to pray for good priests and to thank Him for the good priests we now have. Call 773-8890 with any questions.

CATHOLIC YOUTH AND FAMILY DAY Mark your calendar to join us for our 3rd Annual Catholic Youth and Family Day at Six Flags New England on Friday, August 10, 2018. The day begins in the Rivers Edge Picnic Grove with music at 9am followed by a 9:30am mass celebrated by the Most Rev. Mitchell T. Rozanski, Bishop of Springfield. Then you will have the day to enjoy the park. There is a special package price of only $44.24 which includes park admission, a buffet lunch from 12:30-1:30pm, and free parking. Tickets can be purchased online at sixflags.com/newengland using promo code: Catholicday18. For more information, call Joanne McCormick, Special Events Coordinator, Six Flags, at 413-786-9300 x3524 or Gina Czerwinski, Director of Catechetics and Youth Formation, Diocese of Springfield, at 413-452-0677.

TRAVEL TO BEAUTIFUL CATHOLIC BAVARIA with Fr. Henry Dorsch, Pastor of Our Lady of the Lake Church in Southwick, August 21-29, 2018. Visit historic city centers, picturesque villages, spectacular churches, a Marian shrine famous castles and fortresses along with fabulous scenery, including alpine. Some Masses included. For itinerary and further information email hlpdorsch@aol.com.

VISIT http://diospringfield.org/Ministries/child-youth-protection/ for resources for child abuse prevention and reporting.
THE TERESIANS ARE STILL LOOKING for a few good men, women, or families willing to join us in the spiritual and corporal works of mercy. Out latest project is collecting “toiletries” from hotels. These will be offered at the OLC community meals. There is a marked container in the vestibule. Do NOT buy them. If you want to buy something, consider groceries for distribution from the rectory. Nancy Faller (nafaller@aol.com)

By humility a man finds grace before God and peace with men.
~Bl. Giles of Assisi
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Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,
And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them.

Genowefa Chenelewski 5/27/1929
Andrew Grunkowski
5/27/1942
Sebastian Ptak 5/27/19947
Mary C. Ptak 5/27/1990
Jacob Pawlarzek 5/28/1937
Frand Zebert 5/28/1984
Arthur E. Petrin 5/28/1991
Joseph H. Lapinski 5/28/2003
Stephany Putala 5/29/1937
Joseph Zadroga 5/29/1952
Victoria Golec 5/29/1980
Anna B. Okula 5/29/1981
Phyllis J. Hannon 5/30/1996
Paul Cygan 5/31/1952
Myron M. Strysko 5/31/1989
Frank M. Osciak 5/31/2009
Janet Whellehan Sivik 5/31/2015
Josephine Koscinski 6/1/1980
John M. Dunican 6/1/2013
Aniela Mlecko 6/2/1965

Remember the Holy Souls in Your Prayers
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ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA 01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010

PLEASE NOTE that every day of the month is set aside to pray for a specific priest or deacon of Franklin County. Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar. The intentions for this week are:

         Sunday                                     Monday                                 Tuesday

Our Seminarians                    Clergy in Purgatory                   Deacon Ratté

      Wednesday                    Thursday                          Friday                      Saturday
Clergy who are sick      Clergy in Purgatory       Bishop McDonnell        Fr. Campoli

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD and in memory of Frank Abbondanzio, a donation has been made to our Parish Renovation Fund by Shea-Perry Moving Associates. Bóg zapłać!

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies.

+ PARISH SCHEDULE FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 20, 2018 +

SUNDAY, MAY 20 [PENTECOST]:
8:00 am – Health & Blessings for Daniel Pelc – int. Pelc Family
10:30 am + Living & Deceased Members of the St. Stanislaus Society
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F.)
MONDAY, MAY 21 [Mary, Mother of the Church/St. Christopher Magallanes & Companions.]:
8:00 am – Health & Blessings for Xavier Filipi – int. Elias Filipi
TUESDAY, MAY 22 [St. Camillus and St. Peregrine Novena/St. Rita of Cascia]:
5:30 pm – Living & Deceased Members of the Parda Family – int. Donald Parda
WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 [St. Jude Novena]:
5:30 pm – Adam Cormier – int. Elias Filipi
THURSDAY, MAY 24 :
5:30 pm – For the Church in China – int. Cardinal Kung Foundation
FRIDAY, MAY 25 [St. Bede the Venerable/Pope St. Gregory VII/St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi]:
5:30 pm – Gabriel LaPlume – int. Elias Filipi
SATURDAY, MAY 26 [St. Philip Neri]:
8:00 am + Fr. Bruno & All Living & Deceased members of the St. Joseph Chapter of the Discalced Carmelites Secular Order
4:00 pm + Louise M. Kervian (38th Anniv.) – int. Joyce & Tina Phillips
6:00 pm (Spanish) – For our Parish and Parishioners
SUNDAY, MAY 27 [THE MOST HOLY TRINITY]:
8:00 am – Eugene Wilt Family – int. Ron & Monica Scherman
10:30 am – Health & Blessings for Anthony Filipi – int. Elias Filipi
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F.)
THE ST. STANISLAUS SOCIETY will celebrate their Patron Saint’s Day at the 10:30 a.m. Mass on Sunday, May 21st.

See the source imageMONDAY, MAY 21st is the Feast of Mary, Mother of the Church. This Feast was established by Pope Francis on March 3rd 2018, to be held every year on the Monday following Pentecost Sunday. The title of Mother of the Church is very ancient, going back to the writings of St. Ambrose and Pope St. Leo the Great. In the decree establishing the feast, the Pope said how “in the course of the centuries, Christian piety has honored Mary with various titles, in many way equivalent, such as Mother of Disciples, of the Faithful, of Believers, of all those who are reborn in Christ; and also as ‘Mother of the Church’ as is used in the texts of the spiritual authors as well as in the Magisterium of Popes Benedict XIV and Leo XIII.” This Feast will be celebrated for the first time on Monday, May 21st at the 8:00 a.m. Mass.

MONDAY, MAY 21st is the Feast of St. Christopher Magallanes and his companion martyrs who were either shot or hanged for their association with the Cristero uprising which opposed the anti-Catholic Mexican government in the 1920s. The Cristero motto: “Long live Christ the King and the Virgin of Guadalupe.” They will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

See the source imageTUESDAY, MAY 22nd is the Feast of St. Rita of Cascia. St. Rita was born in 1381 in the town of Roccaporena in Umbria. She lived with a brutal husband and had two sons. After the violent murder of her husband, she urged forgiveness in contrast to the customary vendetta of her day. Becoming an Augustinian nun, she spent some forty years in prayer, contemplation, and service to the sick and poor. Toward the end of her life, she received a wound from a thorn from the crown of thorns. She died in 1457. She is the patron saint of desperate situations. She will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

THE WEEKLY NOVENA TO ST. JUDE, the saint of the impossible, takes place on Wednesday, May 23rd at the 5:30 p.m. Mass.

THE GENTLEMEN OF ST. JOSEPH will meet on Wednesday, May 24th at 6:00 p.m. for a Holy Hour with Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament followed by a meeting in the undercroft. The Gentlemen of St. Joseph are a group of men dedicated to answering the call of Mary to lead families to her son, Jesus. All men are welcome. Supper is served!

ALL ARE INVITED to the Gentlemen of St. Joseph Holy Hour following the 5:30 p.m. Mass on Wednesday, May 24th at which time the Blessed Sacrament will be exposed. The Holy Hour will conclude with Benediction at 7:00 p.m.

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FRIDAY, MAY 25th is the Feast of three saints: St. Bede, Pope St. Gregory VII and St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi. St. Bede, often called Venerable Bede, was the author of many spiritual works and is known as the Father of English history. He was considered the most learned man of his day and is one of the patrons of England. Pope St. Gregory VII championed reform of the clergy and the liberation of the Church from secular power. He died in exile and his last recorded words were “I have loved justice and hated iniquity…; therefore, I die in exile.” St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi was a Carmelite nun and a mystic. She was instrumental in renewing the fervor of the nuns in her Order. Her last years were characterized by great suffering, yet she prayed to suffer all the more for love for Jesus Christ Crucified.

THE WEEKLY PRO-LIFE NOVENA is offered every Saturday before the 8:00 a.m. Mass. All are invited to come and beg God for an end to the terrifying evil which is destroying our nation.

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SATURDAY, MAY 26th is the Feast of St. Philip Neri who was noted for his joyful and simple spirit. He stressed constantly that joy and holiness are one and the same. He is the patron saint of Rome. He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Terry Dempsey for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish. We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

THE ST JOHN PAUL II YOUTH GROUP will be attending the Steubenville East Youth Conference, July 13-15, in Lowell, MA. The conference is open to current 8th graders through graduating seniors. Each year around 30 youth from the area participate in this chance to grow in their faith. For more information, contact Ed or Suzi Cottrill at 413-772-6062 or stjpiiyouthgroup@gmail.com.

GIANT PARISH TAG SALE – It is time to clean out your attics and cellars and prepare for our annual giant tag sale which will take place this year on Saturday, June 30th from 9:00 – 1:00 on the church grounds. Please drop off tag sale items at the rectory garage. If you have large pieces of furniture and need help, call the rectory. PLEASE NO televisions, computers, printers, mattresses, clothing or books. Please call Shirley Webb at 773-7202 if you have any questions.

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AS OUR GARDENS burst into bloom, please remember the altars in our church. All flowers are gladly accepted to decorate our altars. Please let Mary Kobera know what you have and when you will be bringing them so she can arrange the altars to glorify God and beautify the Mass.
PLEASE JOIN US on Sunday, May 27th, in the undercroft after the 10:30 a.m. Mass for a Special Celebration for FR. SEAN’S 10th ANNIVERSARY OF ORDINATION. This will be a simple reception in his honor with hors d’oeuvres, deserts, and cake! Please come by and say thank you to Fr. Sean for his Priesthood. There is a sign-up sheet in the vestibule for anyone who would like to make an hors d’oeuvre or desert; items may be brought to the undercroft any time after 9:00 on May 27th.

PLEASE DON’T FORGET OUR GROCERIES for the Poor Project! Many people who are having a hard time come to the Rectory for help. Please help us to help them. It is a sad and heartbreaking thing to turn someone away when we run out of groceries! Any non-perishable items that you can spare will be greatly appreciated – canned hams, tuna fish, peanut butter, baked beans, dry milk, canned soups and stews, jam, crackers, juices, etc. Please leave them in the front vestibule of the church.

THE NEXT COMMUNITY MEAL WILL TAKE PLACE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 30TH! There will be a sign up sheet and pans available in the front vestibule by the beginning of May. Please contact Cathy Becklo with any questions, at acbecklo@comcast.net. We look forward to another successful dinner without a snowstorm getting in the way! God bless all the hearts and hands that make this a great program!

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Last day for Catechism classes – Sunday, May 20th
Parents are encouraged to continue a program of prayer and Sacraments
with their children. It’s a matter of eternal life or eternal death.

THE SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION will be administered in our parish on Sunday, June 10th, 2018, at the 10:30 a.m. Mass by Msgr. Ronald G. Yargeau. Parish societies will gather before the Mass to escort the Confrimandi and Msgr. into church.

ST. ANTHONY LEBANESE FESTIVAL St. Anthony Maronite Catholic Church located at 375 Island Pond Road, Springfield, MA 01108 announces the date for the St. Anthony Lebanese Festival ~ Saturday, June 2, 2018 from 11:00 a.m – 11:00 p.m. Highlights of the day will include: Arabic and American food, desserts and beverages, Hookah station, Entertainment, Heritage display and handouts, Children’s games and activities, Opportunity raffles. More information will be posted and updated on: http://www.saintanthonyschurch.org/ Come and Experience Lebanese Hospitality! SAVE the DATE!

THE SEVEN GIFTS OF THE HOLY SPIRIT:
THE GIFT OF FEAR OF THE LORD
By Dom Prosper Guéranger, O.S.B.

See the source imagePride is the obstacle to man’s virtue and well-being. It is pride that leads us to resist God, to make self our last end, in a word, to work our own ruin. Humility alone can save us from this terrible danger. Who will give us humility? The Holy Ghost; and his by infusing into us the gift of the fear of God.
This holy sentiment is based on the following truths, which are taught us by faith: the sovereign majesty of God, in comparison with whom we are mere nothingness; the infinite sanctity of that God, in whose presence we are but unworthiness and sin; the severe and just judgment we are to go through after death; the danger of falling into sin, which may be our misfortune at any time, if we do not correspond to grace, for although grace be never wanting, yet we have it in our power to resist it.
Man, as the apostle tells us, must work out his salvation with fear and trembling (Phil. 2:12); but this fear, which is a gift of the Holy Ghost, is not the base sentiment which goes no further than the dread of eternal punishments. It keeps alive within us an abiding compunction of heart, even though we hope that our sins have long ago been forgiven. It prevents our forgetting that we our sinners, that we are wholly dependent upon God’s mercy, and that we are not as yet safe, except in hope (Rom. 8:24).
This fear of God, therefore, is not a servile fear; on the contrary, it is the source of the noblest sentiments. Inasmuch as it is a filial dread of offending God by sin, it may go hand-in-hand with love. Arising as it does from a reverence for God’s infinite majesty and holiness, it puts the creature in his right place, and, as St. Paul says, it contributes to the perfecting of sanctification (2 Cor. 7:1). Hence this great apostle, who had been rapt up to the third heaven, assures us that he was severe in his treatment of himself, lest he should become a cast-away (1 Cor. 9:27).
The spirit of independence and of false liberty, which is nowadays so rife amongst us, is a great enemy to the fear of God; and one of the miseries of our age is, that there is little fear of God. Familiarity with God but too frequently usurps the place of that essential basis of the Christian life. The result is, that there is no progress in virtue, such people are a prey to illusion; and the sacraments, which previously worked so powerfully in their souls, are now well-nigh unproductive. The reason is, that the gift of fear has been superseded by a conceited self-complacency. Humility has no further sway; a secret and habitual pride has paralysed the soul; and seeing that these people scout the very idea of their ever trembling before the great God of heaven, we may well ask them if they know who God is.
Therefore we beseech thee, O holy Spirit! keep up within us the fear of God, which Thou didst infuse into our hearts at our Baptism. This saving fear will ensure our perseverance in virtue, for it will oppose the growth of pride. Let it pierce our soul through and through, and ever abide with us as our safeguard. Let it bring down our haughtiness, and rouse us from tepidity, by ceaselessly reminding us of the greatness and holiness of Him who is our Creator and our Judge.
This holy fear does not stifle the sentiment of love; on the contrary, it removes what would be a hindrance to its growth. The heavenly Powers see and ardently love their God, their infinite and eternal good; and yet, they tremble before His dread Majesty: Tremunt Potestates (“Powers tremble”, from the Prefaces of the Eucharistic Prayer). And shall we, covered as we are with the wounds of our sins, disfigured by countless imperfections, exposed on every side to snares, obliged to fight with so many enemies– shall we flatter ourselves that we can do without this strong and filial fear? and that we need nothing to stimulate us, when we are in those frequent trials– a want of fervour in our will, or of light in our mind? O holy Spirit! watch over us! Preserve within us Thy precious gift! Teach us how to combine peace and joy of heart with the fear of our Lord and God, according to those words of the psalmist: Serve ye the Lord with fear, and rejoice unto Him with trembling (Ps. 2:11)!

From a Meditation on the Seven Gifts of the Holy Spirit, from The Liturgical Year (Vol. IX) by Dom Prosper Guéranger, O.S.B. (1805-1875), founding Abbot of St. Peter’s Abbey, Solesmes, France.
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OFFICE OF VOCATIONS: The confused and fear-filled apostles were totally changed by the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, as they became powerful and dynamic proclaimers of their faith in Jesus Christ. God calls priests and religious to serve Him and to serve others, especially by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit in today’s Church. If you feel a call to a Church vocation, email Fr. Matt or Fr. Michael: vocations@diospringfield.org and/or visit our website: http://www.myvocation.com.

HOLY HOUR AND MINI RETREAT – Join us before the Blessed Sacrament for the Holy Hour and Mini Retreat of the Guard of Honor of the Sacred Heart. The Holy Hour is every Thursday and the Mini Retreat is the last Thursday of every month in our church following the 5:30 p.m. Mass from 6:15 – 7:15 p.m. with our Pastor, Fr. Séan O’Mannion, National Director of the Guard of Honor – USA.

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD a donation has been made to our parish by U. Barbara Bridge. Bóg wielki zapłać!
Yes, the Church Still Believes in Indulgences
Stephen Beale

According to a certain perspective, the Second Vatican Council was a long overdue updating of Church doctrine and reconciliation with the world, so to speak, which necessarily entailed jettisoning old devotional practices that more enlightened thinkers considered creepy and superstitious.
Surely, that must mean goodbye to indulgences—that medieval custom that supposedly so scandalized some that it sparked the Protestant Reformation. Right?
Yet it was not in the Middle Ages, not during the Council of Trent, and not in the Counter-Reformation that ensued that the Church mounted one of its most full-throttled defenses of indulgences. No, that happened after the Second Vatican Council—in 1967.
That year, Pope Paul VI—who oversaw most of the council proceedings—issued his encyclical Indulgentiarum Doctrina, which at once reformed indulgences but also pulled no punches in defending them.
The upshot of all this is that if you want to be engaged with what the Church teaches and practices in a post-Vatican II world, indulgences are part of the package.
But just why did Paul VI believe indulgences were so important?
For starters, a definition might help: Paul VI defines an indulgence as the remission of the temporal penalty of sin. Note that remission is not the same as forgiveness. One analogy is a car wreck for which you are at fault. The other driver may forgive you, but you are still responsible for covering the costs of repair.
Now, in the grand scheme of things, indulgences might seem to some to be a far lower priority than other things, such as, forgiveness, to take an obvious example. But Paul VI shows that indulgences are deeply rooted in the fundamental teachings of the Church. He grounds them in three particular teachings.
First, there is the reality of sin:
Every sin in fact causes a perturbation in the universal order established by God in His ineffable wisdom and infinite charity, and the destruction of immense values with respect to the sinner himself and to the human community. Christians throughout history have always regarded sin not only as a transgression of divine law but also … as contempt for or disregard of the friendship between God and man.
The existence of a real punishment reinforces this, Paul adds: “The very existence and the gravity of the punishment enable us to understand the foolishness and malice of sin and its harmful consequences.”
The second foundation for indulgences is the doctrine of the communion of saints. There is a ‘supernatural solidarity’ among men and women in which ‘the sin of one harms the others just as the holiness of one also benefits the others.’ The holy deeds of the saints build up what has been traditionally described as the ‘treasury of merits.’ This treasury consists of the ‘infinite and inexhaustible value the expiation and the merits’ of Christ. Mary and all the saints also contribute to it through their good works, according to Paul.
Third and finally, indulgences are a logical outgrowth of penances. According to the catechism, an act of penance—assigned to a repentant sinner by a confessor—makes satisfaction for sin and heals the harm it caused. A similar principle is behind indulgences.
All three of the above teachings are at work in the doctrine of indulgences. To restate the above definition: an indulgence occurs when the Church, using its God-given authority, draws upon the treasury of merits to remit the temporal penalty of sin.
But what exactly must one do to receive an indulgence? First, one must be properly prepared or disposed. In the words of Paul, those seeking indulgences must ‘love God, detest sin, place their trust in the merits of Christ and believe firmly in the great assistance they derive from the Communion of Saints.’ (There are also three formal prerequisites: confession, communion, and prayer for the intentions of the pope.)
But what exactly is the ‘act’ that must be performed? Paul’s encyclical was issued in advance of a new edition of a Church compendium on indulgenced acts, known as the Enchiridion Indulgentiarium. Anyone who wants an exhaustive list can find it there. But to summarize briefly, the act for which one can gain an indulgence essentially boils down to either a prayer or a certain devout act.
Examples of prayer include: the Memorare, Psalm 50, and certain novenas. Singing certain hymns, such as Tantum Ergo or even repeating certain pious phrases also qualify.
Devout acts that are indulgenced include: visiting a catacomb, stopping at a cemetery, or going to a church on All Souls Day.
These examples of indulgences hint at one of the purposes behind the practice—and it’s not just the remission of the temporal penalty of sin. Indulgences also are one way the Church helps the faithful prioritize just what prayers and devotional practices are most important.
As Paul puts it: “It constantly reminds them, though, of those things which are to be given preference because they are necessary or at least better and more efficacious for the attainment of salvation.”
Those of us who know our liturgical calendars are reminded that November is specially devoted to the souls in purgatory—where all the souls whose sins are forgiven but who have not fully remitted the attaching temporal penalty receive a final purification before entering heaven. This is a fitting time for us to re-introduce ourselves to the tradition of indulgences—not only for our own benefit but also for the building up of the Church’s treasury.
Ecce ancilla Domini: Music in the Sacred Liturgy
Part Second: Sanctity, Goodness of Form, & Universality
2. Sacred music should consequently possess, in the highest degree, the qualities proper to the liturgy, and in particular sanctity and goodness of form, which will spontaneously produce the final quality of universality.
I would like to dwell for a moment on these last three qualities which Pope St. Pius X gives in his Motu Proprio on Sacred Music: Sanctity, Goodness of form, and Universality, as they, being the most important aspects of the Church’s teaching on Sacred Music, have, in the past 50 or so years (at least!), been the most ignored.
Sanctity: When the Holy Father elaborates on the idea of Sanctity, or Holiness, in Sacred Music, he says, “It must…exclude all profanity not only in itself, but in the manner in which it is presented”. When His Holiness uses the term “profane” what he is referring to could be rendered as “secular” or “worldly”, that is, any music that could easily be mistaken for anything other than ecclesiastical music should not be used in the Church—this would include anything that could be mistaken for a pop ballad, a rock-and-roll song, a Broadway tune, an opera aria, a country song, polka music, etc.; and notice that he also refers to the “manner in which it is presented”—taking different types of voices into account, which are unique and particular to each singer—even the manner of performance should not be “secular”, in other words, the singers should not position themselves in such a way as to be seen to be giving a concert and should not be drawing attention to themselves, either inadvertently or on purpose. While one should never judge the interior disposition of the singers in churches—most of whom are there for goodly and pious reasons—this injunction by the Sainted Pope really ought to be considered where externals are concerned. For example: if singers are positioned in such a way as to be facing the congregation as if giving a performance, if cantors and soloists perform from a position which encourages the congregants to focus on the singer rather than the liturgical action at hand, this can be seen as adopting a “profane” manner of performance.
Goodness of Form: “It must be true art”. To be used in the liturgy, Sacred Music must have a certain goodness of form and be truly a work of art: this is not merely a matter of subjective taste. Goodness of form is an objective quality in music—what we are looking for here is craftsmanship. Just as people expect the physical elements of worship, such as vestments, woodwork, sculpture, painting, even the church building itself, to be of the highest quality, so to should the music.
Music, as any art, has certain rules; just as a building can collapse if the rules of physics are not followed by the architect, so can a piece of music collapse if the rules of music are not followed by the composer. Much music has been written for church use in the past hundred years which are so poorly written that they would not pass an introductory composition course. Worse, they are so heavily laden with the vernacular of a certain epoch, as to fail to ‘speak’ to later generations as anything other than cute or pretty, and certainly not as anything befitting the grandeur of the Temple of the Most High God. While, to a certain extent, the judgement of ‘goodness of form’ is the province of professional musicians, anyone can judge whether a piece of music is well crafted, no matter what genre. In other words, not just anything will do.
Universality: This is probably the most over-looked aspect of Sacred Music in the post-conciliar period. The misguided notion of “inculturation” has encouraged a false idea in the world of church music, namely that Sacred Music should mimic the sounds of a particular culture, particularly forms of popular music: this is how we got folk Masses and polka Masses, and how rock-and-roll and mariachi became incorporated into the liturgy. This type of thing removes the catholicity of Sacred Music, which truly ought, as the liturgy itself, be “all things to all men”. While it has always been the case that the Church has encouraged different styles of Sacred Music to flourish, there has always been a certain universality. For example, the polyphonic music of Palestrina, while exhibiting the finest qualities of Italian music at the time, can be performed in its native Italy, in Spain, in Poland, in Japan, and in Brazil, and yet is unmistakably Sacred and Catholic—it is universal. Conversely, a piece of pop-styled, praise and worship music from the United States, if performed in Italy, Mexico, Sudan, or Roumania, is indistinguishable from any other piece of American pop music, and, unless those listening can understand English, might not even know that the piece is religious in nature. In other words, this music is only “sacred” to those who are familiar with the genre or piece—it is not universally “sacred” in character. This phenomenon of Universality has even been encountered among children and young people who are unchurched: certain styles of music evoke the image of “church”, just as other styles evoke the image of “cocktail lounge”—even Hollywood recognizes this: When a movie shows a scene in a Catholic church, or even a person or even loosely related with the Church, the music that is played in the soundtrack is or evokes traditional Catholic music.
Gregorian Chant: The principles of Sanctity, Goodness of Form, and Universality are perhaps the most vividly shown in the Gregorian Chant. Pius X, in the Motu Proprio Tra le sollecitudini particularly extolls the Gregorian chant:
3. These qualities are to be found, in the highest degree, in Gregorian Chant, which is, consequently the Chant proper to the Roman Church, the only chant she has inherited from the ancient fathers, which she has jealously guarded for centuries in her liturgical codices, which she directly proposes to the faithful as her own, which she prescribes exclusively for some parts of the liturgy, and which the most recent studies have so happily restored to their integrity and purity.
On these grounds Gregorian Chant has always been regarded as the supreme model for sacred music, so that it is fully legitimate to lay down the following rule: the more closely a composition for church approaches in its movement, inspiration and savor the Gregorian form, the more sacred and liturgical it becomes; and the more out of harmony it is with that supreme model, the less worthy it is of the temple.
In fact, Pius’s apologia for the Gregorian Chant is so thorough that I feel that I can add little to it, but to summarize his points:
Firstly, Gregorian Chant is native to the Roman Rite, and is inseparable from it. In fact, since every part of the Mass (apart from the sermon) is intended to be sung, including the Entrance, Offertory, and Communion Chants, the Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei, the Prayers of the priest, the Preface, the Eucharistic Prayer, etc., even the Readings (!), and is found in a Gregorian setting going back to the earliest times, it is perfectly reasonable to say the Gregorian Chant is the Roman Rite. And since the Roman Rite is Universal, then, naturally, so is its proper mode of execution, the Gregorian Chant.
While over the past few decades some liturgists and musicians have derided the Chant for being old-fashioned or lugubrious, the Chant is now making a comeback, particularly in the more traditionally-minded parishes which are attended by an ever-growing group of young people, looking for a connexion with a Catholic past that reaches beyond 1971.
The wider use of the Gregorian Chant, particularly in the Church’s sacred language of Latin, is particularly important as the Church becomes more universal with the 20th/21st century phenomena of immigration and easy international travel. The chant belongs to every Catholic, no matter his native tongue, and this is particularly important for the parts pertaining to the people: the so-called Ordinary of the Mass (more in the future). If Catholics in their native countries knew the Gregorian Chant, then they could actively participate in the Mass in any Catholic church, in any country on Earth: a Pole could participate at Mass in Uganda, and a Ugandan could participate at Mass in Mexico, and, yes, a Mexican could participate at Mass in a Polish parish in an English-speaking country like the United States.
I feel that here I can do no more than simply to repeat what St. Pius X writes in his Motu Proprio:
The ancient traditional Gregorian Chant must, therefore, in a large measure be restored to the functions of public worship, and the fact must be accepted by all that an ecclesiastical function loses none of its solemnity when accompanied by this music alone.
Special efforts are to be made to restore the use of the Gregorian Chant by the people, so that the faithful may again take a more active part in the ecclesiastical offices, as was the case in ancient times.
~ Henry Gaida, Director of Music

[Erratum: In the previous part, it was mistakenly written that the phrase Ecce ancilla Domini, comes from the Magnificat; it is, of course, from the Angelus, taken from the account of the Annunciation in the Gospel of Luke.]
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PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments! Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

THE KNIGHTS & LADIES OF ST. PETER CLAVER will hold their First Annual Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, October 27th, 2018, at the Bishop Marshall Center at St. Michael’s Cathedral. If anyone would like to rent a table, please call Lady Joy Danita Allen at 413-204-1553. The deadline for table rentals is October 1st—Don’t wait ‘til the last minute!

THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL DIOCESAN-WIDE EUCHARISTIC ROSARY PROCESSION will take place on Sunday, June 3rd, 2018, (rain or shine) at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish at 99 King St. in Northampton, from 1-4 P.M., beginning with a talk given by Fr. Chris Alar, MIC, director of The Marian Helper Center, in Stockbridge, who will speak on “The Call to Holiness Through Divine Mercy, for the Family, the Domestic Church”. During his talk, there will be priests available for the Sacrament of Confession. At 2:00 P.M., we will begin our prayerful event with a Consecration of the Family to the Divine Mercy, followed by a Rosary Procession through downtown Northampton, returning to the church for the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, with a reception to follow. For more information, contact George or Brenda at (413) 221-4372.
CATHOLIC YOUTH AND FAMILY DAY Mark your calendar to join us for our 3rd Annual Catholic Youth and Family Day at Six Flags New England on Friday, August 10, 2018. The day begins in the Rivers Edge Picnic Grove with music at 9am followed by a 9:30am mass celebrated by the Most Rev. Mitchell T. Rozanski, Bishop of Springfield. Then you will have the day to enjoy the park. There is a special package price of only $44.24 which includes park admission, a buffet lunch from 12:30-1:30pm, and free parking. Tickets can be purchased online at sixflags.com/newengland using promo code: Catholicday18. For more information, call Joanne McCormick, Special Events Coordinator, Six Flags, at 413-786-9300 x3524 or Gina Czerwinski, Director of Catechetics and Youth Formation, Diocese of Springfield, at 413-452-0677.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries. They will be offered as follows and you may attend the Masses here in our church as the Missionaries offer the Masses in their churches:

SUNDAY, MAY 20: 8:00 + Jack Furtado – int. Joyce & Tina Phillips
SUNDAY, MAY 20: 10:30 + Michael Podkladok – int. Vadj
TUESDAY, MAY 22: + Martin G. Fritz – int. Family
SATURDAY, MAY 26: 8:00 + Elizabeth Truesdell – int. Betty Fritz

PLEASE NOTE: The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help the Missionaries who often times receive very little help. It also helps the people where the Masses are offered. Bóg wam zapłać!

SPECIAL PROGRAMING NOTE FROM CATHOLIC COMMUNICATIONS Catholic Communications has announced programing changes for Real to Reel and Chalice of Salvation for the months of May and June for those viewing on WWLP-TV 22. Chalice of Salvation, the weekly televised Mass, will air at a special time of 6 a.m. on Sunday May 13 and again at 6 a.m. on June 10. Real to Reel will air on a special day and time of 6:30 a.m. on Sunday May 6 and Sunday May 20. Also Real to Reel will not air on Saturday, May 12. Please be sure to make a note of these special times and let your homebound friends know of the scheduled changes as well. Full versions of both programs can be viewed at http://www.iobserve.org starting the Monday after broadcast.

HOLY HOUR FOR VOCATIONS Please come to a Holy Hour for Vocations on the second Sunday of every month at 7:00 p.m. in the Franklin County Adoration Chapel in Greenfield. Join us to pray for good priests and to thank Him for the good priests we now have. Call 773-8890 with any questions.

HOLY HOUR FOR THE SICK AND DYING – A Holy Hour is being observed each Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. in the Adoration Chapel at Blessed Sacrament Church in Greenfield. Included are the singing of hymns, recitation of the Rosary, and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy for the Sick and the Dying. The hour concludes with Benediction. If you know of someone who is ailing and in need of special graces and prayer, please be encouraged to come and spend an hour for his/her intention. All are welcome.
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Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,
And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them.

Antonina Karp 5/20/1940
Francis Brzozowy 5/20/1951
John Dlugosz 5/20/1963
Frank M. Olchowski 5/21/1959
Paul Drazek 5/21/1964
Martin S. Kopek 5/21/1973
Viola J. Dziekonski 5/21/2008
William Russell Van 5/21/2015
Gerald W. Tetreault 5/21/2016
Joseph Brozo 5/22/1977
Mildred Margola 5/22/2010
Francis Szcjepanski 5/23/1949
Mary Ostrowski 5/23/1969
Donald Denkiewicz 5/23/1977
Dominick F. Ostroski 5/23/1992
Carroll V. Mileski 5/24/2012
Mikolaj Seredejko 5/25/1956
Sophie C. Ostroski 5/25/2005
Mary Zak 5/26/1938
John Hilro 5/26/1942
Anna Stewart 5/26/1973
Frederick Kallins 5/26/1992
Genowefa Chenelewski 5/27/1929
Andrew Grunkowski 5/27/1942
Sebastian Ptak 5/27/19947
Mary C. Ptak 5/27/1990

Remember the Holy Souls in Your Prayers
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ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA 01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010

PLEASE NOTE that every day of the month is set aside to pray for a specific priest or deacon of Franklin County. Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar. The intentions for this week are:

        Sunday                                    Monday                                                        Tuesday

Deacon Patten       Fr. Aksamit ,  Deacon Nolan,  Deacon DeCarlo   Our Deacon Candidates

                                  Wednesday                                           Thursday                     
                          Clergy who are sick            Fr. Roach, Fr. Bermudez, Deacon Bucci  

                                    Friday                                                    Saturday

                           Deacon Culliton                                              Fr. Roux

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD and in memory of Claire Zak, a donations have been made to our Parish Renovation Fund by Ashley & Shirley Webb, and Joseph Zak. Bóg wam zapłać!

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies.

JMJ
PARISH SCHEDULE FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 13, 2018 +

SUNDAY, MAY 13 [Seventh Sunday of Easter]: Mothers’ Day
8:00 am + Mothers’ Day Novena II
10:30 am + Mothers’ Day Novena III First Communion
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F. Sunday after the Ascension)
MONDAY, MAY 14 [St. Matthias]:
8:00 am – Mothers’ Day Novena IV
TUESDAY, MAY 15 [St. Camillus and St. Peregrine Novena/St. Isidore]:
5:30 pm – Mothers’ Day Novena V
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 [St. Jude Novena/St. Andrew Bobola]:
5:30 pm – Mothers’ Day Novena VI
THURSDAY, MAY 17 :
5:30 pm – Mothers’ Day Novena VII
FRIDAY, MAY 18 [Pope St. John I/Bl. Stanislaus Papczynski]:
5:30 pm – Mothers’ Day Novena VIII
SATURDAY, MAY 19 :
8:00 am – Mothers’ Day Novena IX
4:00 pm + Raymond F. Kervian – int. Joyce & Tina Phillips
6:00 pm (Spanish) – For our Parish and Parishioners
SUNDAY, MAY 20 [PENTECOST]:
8:00 am – Health & Blessings for Daniel Pelc – int. Pelc Family
10:30 am + Living & Deceased Members of the St. Stanislaus Society
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F.)

+ KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIĘ ZA NAMI +
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To Our Children Making Their
First Holy Communion

Hanna Marguerite Marie Blanchard           Kimberly Angie Ramirez Martin
Grady James Deery                                          Dominic Anthony Martino
Samuel Thomas Eichorn                                 Angela Theresa Otrando
Emma Margaret Mary Germain                   Grace Thérèse Rose-Fish
Nolan Michael Kalinowski                             Anthony Patrick Seamans
Eden Rose LaPlume                                         Marius Joseph Sonntag
Jaiden Christopher Lapointe                         Lucja Jamie Webb Yagodzinski

 

Be joyful as our Blessed Lord Jesus enters your hearts and souls today! Pledge your love and loyalty as you kneel to Him, and pray for your families and your parish… pray for all the good things we each need! You will know a happiness greater than earthly things can provide! The constant joy and heart’s content that only His loving presence brings!
God bless you all!!
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HERE IS A SIMPLE little explanation for all our non-Catholic friends who may wonder what to do at Communion time. Please note that Catholics believe that the host is the actual and living Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, and that the one receiving Holy Communion in a Roman Catholic Church believes everything the Catholic Church teaches—and that is why—for a non-Catholic to receive Holy Communion in a Catholic Church, would seriously compromise their personal faith. So—at Holy Communion—while non Catholics, of course, would not receive Holy Communion, they may, if they wish, come forward for a blessing by approaching the priest, bowing their heads and crossing their hands over their heart.

See the source imageON THE OCCASION OF HIS FIRST COMMUNION Bl. Margaret Bosco told her son, St. John Bosco, “…This has been a great day for you. I know that God has truly taken possession of your heart. Now promise Him that you will do all you can to stay this way to the end of your life. From now on go to Holy Communion often but beware of sacrilegious Communion. Be always obedient; go readily to your catechism class and to sermons but, above all, shun as a plague anyone who uses bad language.” He later said that he remembered these words of his holy mother and tried to follow her advice.

A NUMBER OF PEOPLE HAVE ASKED, “What are the official guidelines for Catholics and non-Catholics receiving Holy Communion?” Below are the guidelines given by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops of the United States of America:

For Catholics: Catholics fully participate in the celebration of the Eucharist when they receive Holy Communion in fulfillment of Christ’s command to eat His Body and drink His Blood. In order to be disposed properly to receive Communion, communicants should not be conscious of grave sin, have fasted for one hour, and seek to live in charity and love with their neighbors. Persons conscious of grave sin must first be reconciled with God and the Church through the Sacrament of Confession. A frequent reception of the Sacrament of Confession is encouraged for all.

For Other Christians: We welcome to this celebration of the Holy Eucharist those Christians who are not fully united with us in Faith as Roman Catholics and we invite you to pray with us. However, it is a consequence of the sad divisions in Christianity that we cannot extend to them a general invitation to receive Holy Communion. Roman Catholics, accepting Holy Scripture, believe that the Eucharist is, in fact, the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Lord Jesus Christ and signifies a oneness in faith, life and worship. Reception of the Eucharist by Christians not fully united with us would imply a oneness and a belief which does not yet exist, and for which we must all pray.

For Those Not Receiving Communion: Those not receiving Sacramental Communion are encouraged to express in their hearts a prayerful desire for unity with the Lord Jesus and with one another. (This is called a “Spiritual Communion.)

For Non-Christians: We also welcome to this celebration those who do not share our faith in Jesus. While we cannot extend to them an invitation to receive Communion, we do invite them to be united with us in prayer.

National Conference of Catholic Bishops, Washington, D.C.

“Whosoever shall eat this Bread, or drink the Chalice of the Lord unworthily, shall be guilty of the Body and of the Blood of the Lord. But let a man prove himself; and so let him eat of that Bread, and drink of the Chalice. For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh judgment to himself, not discerning the Body of the Lord.”
(1 Corinthians 11:27-29)
MONDAY, MAY 14th is the Feast of St. Matthias the Apostle who was chosen to replace Judas. He was one of the witnesses of the Resurrection and was martyred for his Faith. He will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

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TUESDAY, MAY 15th is the Feast of St. Isidore the Farmewhose wife, Maria de la Cabeza, is also a saint. St. Isidore was known for his hard work, his charity and his intense prayer life. Miracles surrounded him in life and in death. He is the patron saint of farmers and rural communities. He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m. His relic will be venerated following the Mass. We have a statue of St. Isidore in the back of the church which shows him engrossed in prayer with a plow at his feet.

 

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MAY 16th IS THE FEAST of the Great Polish Jesuit-Martyr St. Andrew Bobola. St. Andrew was born of an aristocratic Polish family in 1591 and became a Jesuit in 1609. St. Andrew was a great preacher and missionary who spent more than 20 years traveling the countryside bringing whole villages of separated Christians and lax Catholics back to the Faith.
Because of his holy success, St. Andrew was hated by the enemies of the Church who plotted to kill him. In 1657 he was captured by the Cossacks and tortured without mercy. He was beaten, slashed by a sword and his hands cut off. Then he was skinned alive, scorched and mutilated by having his nose, lips and tongue cut off. In spite of the cruel punishment, St. Andrew heroically held to the Catholic Faith. At last his head was cut off and his body cast on a dung heap. When the body of St. Andrew was medically examined almost 100 years later it was found to be inexplicably incorrupt.

THE WEEKLY NOVENA TO ST. JUDE, the saint of the impossible, takes place on Wednesday, May 16th at the 5:30 p.m. Mass.

THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS will hold their monthly meeting this week, Wednesday, May 16th, at 6:30 p.m. in the church undercroft. All members are asked to attend.

FRIDAY, MAY 18th is the Feast of Pope St. John I who died a martyr’s death defending the true Faith of Jesus Christ. He will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

MAY 18th is the birthday of Pope St. John Paul II. Ask our friend in Heaven to pray for us, for our parish and for our families.

THE WEEKLY PRO-LIFE NOVENA is offered every Saturday before the 8:00 a.m. Mass. All are invited to come and beg God for an end to the terrifying evil which is destroying our nation.

God’s Special Weapon Against Evil: Spiritual Mothers
Kathleen Beckman

There is a most beautiful, vital vocation within a vocation that is “largely unknown, scarcely understood and, consequently, rarely lived, notwithstanding its fundamental importance”: spiritual motherhood for priests. “It is a vocation that is frequently hidden, invisible to the naked eye, but meant to transmit spiritual life.” (Mauro Cardinal Piacenza, Eucharistic Adoration for the Sanctification of Priests & Spiritual Motherhood, 2013, p 12,13).
Cardinal Piacenza further explains the reason why now is the time to emphasize this vocation for the broader Church, “The present situation of the Church in a secularized world and the subsequent crisis of faith has the pope, bishops, priests and faithful looking for a way forward. At the same time, it is becoming increasingly clear that the real solution lies in the interior renewal of priests, and in this context the so-called “spiritual maternity for priests” assumes a special role. Through being “spiritual mothers”, women and mothers participate in the universal motherhood of Mary, who as mother of the Supreme and Eternal High Priest, is also the mother of all priests of all times.”
Other Marys
From the heart of the Church comes a call to imitate Mary in transmitting spiritual life to souls. A trumpet sounds, a need arises, and the role of Catholic womanhood is called forth. Where are the “other Mary’s”? I’ve often reflected on why the Lord Jesus, when He ascended to the Father, left behind His holy Mother at the start of the Church? Her presence, prayer, encouragement, wisdom, and exhortation; her feminine love must have strengthened the Apostles. Her maternal holiness and prayer helped to form the first clergy.
In the words of Fr. John Cihak, “The Blessed Virgin Mary’s role is to call out of the priest this celibate “agape” to help him become a husband to the Church and a spiritual father—a strong father, even in his weakness. She does this at the foot of the Cross by drawing the priest out of his own pain to offer pure masculine love in the midst of her own feminine love. This scene becomes the icon of the relationship between the priest and the Church.” (Fr. John Cihak article, “The Blessed Virgin Mary’s Role in the Celibate Priest’s Spousal and Paternal Love”, quoted by Beckman, Praying for Priests: A Mission for the New Evangelization, p 54, 55.)
The lesson for spiritual mothers: the more we reflect the heart of Mary, the more God can use us to spiritually call forth from men the masculine ideal of Christ-like spiritual fatherhood.
The role of a Catholic woman might be summed up in a word: MARY.
 Motherhood (physical and spiritual)
 Adoration (first duty to God)
 Resourceful (wise, creative)
 Yes to God (serving the divine will)
Some women will transmit life physically but all women of faith can be life bearers: Christ-bearers. What does Catholic womanhood have to do with the clergy? We can learn from several female saints whose lives bear witness to the beauty of spiritual maternity for priests.
“Woman: God’s special weapon in His fight against evil”
St. Edith Stein helps us to understand the unique role of woman in God’s plan. Always the role of woman is best revealed in the life of the Virgin Mary. Her singular dignity to be the Mother of Christ reveals the thought of God regarding the dignity of women. He chose women to be cooperators in creating new life. In light of how much the fallen angels despise and fear the Virgin Mary, we better understand the teaching of St. Edith Stein:
The intrinsic value of woman consists essentially in exceptional receptivity for God’s work in the soul. For an understanding of our unique feminine nature, let us look to the pure love and spiritual maternity of Mary. This spiritual maternity is the core of a woman’s soul. Wherever a woman functions authentically in this spirit of maternal love, Mary collaborates with her. This holds true whether the woman is married or single, professional or domestic or both, a Religious in the world or in the convent. Through this love, a woman is God’s special weapon in His fight against evil. Her intrinsic value is that she is able to do so because she has a special susceptibility for the works of God in souls—her own and others. She relates to others in His spirit of love.
Here, a great woman and saint of the Church broadens spiritual motherhood beyond the walls of the cloister or convent where for centuries beloved women Religious Sisters interceded for priests; and thankfully, continue to this present time. More recently, Fr. Raniero Cantalamesa addresses the movement of the Holy Spirit: “God calls some souls to the even higher task of atoning for priests…only men can be priests, but the wisdom of God has kept aside a task for women, and even a higher task in a certain sense, which the world does not understand and thus rejects with distain: that of forming priests and of contributing to raising the quality, not quantity, of Catholic priesthood. The Lord is calling the faithful in ever growing numbers to pray, to offer sacrifices, in order to have holy priests. A concern, a passion, for holy priests has spread as a sign of the times though today’s Church” (Fr. Cantalamessa, OFM, Sober Intoxication of the Spirit: Part Two quoted by Beckman, Praying for Priests, p 18-19).
We turn to Mary to understand how women of faith who are called to be spiritual mothers become God’s special weapon in His fight against evil. We’ll consider the ten evangelical virtues of Mary that form a powerful arsenal of spiritual arrows to mortally wound the fallen angels; those demons who “prowl the earth like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour” (1 Peter 5:8).
The ten evangelical virtues of Mary:
1. Most Pure (Mt 1:18, 20, 23, Lk 1:24,34)
2. Most Prudent (Lk 2:19; 51)
3. Most Humble (Lk 1:48)
4. Most Faithful ( Lk 1:45; Jn 2:5)
5. Most Devout (Lk 1:46-47; Acts 1:14)
6. Most Obedient (Lk 1:38; 2:21-22; 27)
7. Most Poor (Lk 2:7)
8. Most Patient (Jn 19:25)
9. Most Merciful (Lk 1:39, 56)
10. Most Sorrowful (Lk 2:35)
Marian virtues perpetuate the victory of her Son Jesus Christ and can render Satan’s corrupting vices impotent. Satan fears Mary. Why? He knows God is omnipotent. But Mary is a lowly creature favored by God, raised to such a level of dignity and influence that her little heel can crush Satan’s head. He can’t get over this! In many rites of major exorcism in which I have participated on the team assisting the exorcist priest, Mary responds to the plea of the priest to help him cast out demons. Frequently, the Virgin Mary’s presence is the finishing touch to evict the evil one.
A woman who identifies with Mary is His special weapon in His fight against evil. The humble Mother of the Eternal High Priest is gathering a little army of daughters who attain to her virtues. God uses Mary’s daughters as righteous arrows against the malice of the devil.
The example of an ordinary wife and mother
Here’s a practical example in the ordinary life of a Catholic wife and mother of five young sons. She has answered the call to spiritual maternity for priests. Recently, in an interview we did for the Foundation of Prayer for Priests, she shared that when she is making her children’s lunches, desiring to feed them the most nutritious food, she also considers the priest who desires to feed God’s flock the imperishable food of the Eucharist. Then she offers up her tiredness for him.
I asked her how praying for priests has impacted her life as wife and mother. She shared that, at first, she did not fully understand the priest. He was set apart for God and a bit mysterious. When she realized that the Holy Spirit was quickening her heart to pray for her parish priest, the Holy Spirit began to teach her how to pray for him. She came to understand that the priest is a spiritual father of the Catholic family entrusted to him. He is charged with the care of parishioner’s souls but is subject to weariness and spiritual warfare also. During the Mass she observed more carefully the reverent gestures of the priest and began to see more of Jesus on the altar. Also, in recognizing the priest’s spiritual paternity, her appreciation of her husband’s role as spiritual father for the family grew.
When we pray for the priests, the Sanctifier pours graces of wisdom, knowledge and understanding upon us. Thus, we become more like Mary—attuned to the things of God. Priests and laity have a mutual need to mirror holiness for one another. Often this takes place in a silent, hidden, real and transformative way.
“The priest is the target of the devil’s malice”
“The priest is a marked man, the target of the devil’s malice. Don’t pray for priests superficially. Pray fervently. We priests need your prayers and sacrifices” –these words of Fr. William Casey are confirmed by Fr. John Hardon, “…No words I can use would be too strong to state that the Catholic priesthood needs prayer as sacrifice as never before since Calvary. Priests experience pressures with a violence and a virulence such as no one else but a priest can understand. One saint after another has declared that the devil’s principle target on earth is the Catholic priest. Priests need special graces from God. We ask why pray for priests? We should pray for priests and bishops because this has been the practice of the Church since apostolic times. It’s a matter of truth. It is a divine mandate.” (Fr. John Hardon, The Value of Prayer and Sacrifice for Priests, The Real Presence Association, quoted by Beckman, Praying for Priests: A Mission for the New Evangelization, p 21). Priests are the spiritual head of the Body of Christ and therefore; Satan aims to spiritually decapitate the Body of Christ in mockery of the Eternal High Priest. Some spiritual writers refer to Mary as the spiritual neck of the Church connecting the members of Christ’s body with the head, the priests in “persona Christi”—a beautiful analogy.
Spiritual motherhood of priests is our response of love for Jesus Christ. This Year of Mercy is an opportune time to practice a vital spiritual work of mercy: spiritual adoption of priests. May the Lord help you to discover this beautiful vocation within your vocation to His glory.
Visit http://www.foundationforpriests.org for more information on spiritual motherhood, fatherhood and spiritual warfare.

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MOTHER’S DAY CARDS for our annual Mother’s Day Novena of Masses are presently available in the front vestibule. The Novena will continue for nine days of Masses for all Mothers living and departed.

MOTHER’S DAY ROSES FOR LIFE – On Mothers’ Day weekend, May 12th and 13th, roses will be available at the doors of the church to benefit the Pro-Life cause in Franklin County. Donations will be $3.00 per rose / $30 per dozen. All proceeds to benefit pro-life events throughout the year.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Mary LaCroix for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish. We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

A CHANGE IN OUR CHANGE FOR BABIES LENTEN PROGRAM For several years we have made saving our coins and dollars for Alternatives Pregnancy Center part of our Lenten almsgiving here at Our Lady of Czestochowa. This year we will be making a change! Change for Babies will move from Lent to Easter! Bottles will be available on the Second Sunday of Easter, April 15. They will be collected on May 6 & 13, the Sundays before and after the Feast of the Ascension. We look forward to participating in the Change for Babies program as our Easter giving this year!

THE ST JOHN PAUL II YOUTH GROUP will be attending the Steubenville East Youth Conference, July 13-15, in Lowell, MA. The conference is open to current 8th graders through graduating seniors. Each year around 30 youth from the area participate in this chance to grow in their faith. For more information, contact Ed or Suzi Cottrill at 413-772-6062 or stjpiiyouthgroup@gmail.com.

Mary, Mother of the Church
Roman Catholic Spiritual Direction

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Pope Francis very recently declared that a new obligatory memorial is to be celebrated in honor of our Blessed Mother under the title: Mary, Mother of the Church (Mater Ecclesiae). Fittingly, this memorial will take place on the Monday following Pentecost Sunday. The decree was signed on February 11th (the Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes) and released Saturday, March 3, 2018, by the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.
Of course, Mary was there at the start of the Church: when Jesus entrusted the beloved disciple to Her at the foot of the Cross (cf John 19:25-27) and in the Cenacle, when the Holy Spirit descended on the Apostles, and all those gathered with them, at Pentecost (Acts 1:14).
This title of Our Lady, has its origins in early Church Fathers: St. Ambrose in the 4th century, whose Mariology Fr. Hugo Rahner rediscovered and brought to light, St. Augustine, “[who said] that Mary is the mother of the members of Christ, because with charity she cooperated in the rebirth of the faithful into the Church, while [Pope St. Leo the Great said] that the birth of the Head is also the birth of the body, thus indicating that Mary is at once Mother of Christ, the Son of God, and mother of the members of his Mystical Body, which is the Church” [from Pope Francis’ decree]. The Holy Father also explains how: “in the course of the centuries, Christian piety has honoured Mary with various titles, in many ways equivalent, such as Mother of Disciples, of the Faithful, of Believers, of all those who are reborn in Christ; and also as “Mother of the Church” as is used in the texts of spiritual authors as well as in the Magisterium of Popes Benedict XIV and Leo XIII.”
In recent history, we’ve seen the Holy Spirit at work to bring this title for His spouse, the Blessed Virgin Mary, to the full consciousness of the Church. The Papal Magisterium, no doubt inspired by the Third Person of the Holy Trinity, cooperated with this! And, when the Papal Magisterium, through the years, puts emphasis on something, you better believe it’s important.

There have been some notable milestones among these developments:
 Lumen Gentium: When Blessed Pope Paul VI promulgated the Vatican II document Lumen Gentium (LG) in 1964, he proclaimed the Blessed Virgin “Mother of the Church”, for as LG 61 states, “she is a mother to us in the order of grace.”
 Votive Mass: As well, a votive Mass was proposed on the 1975 Holy Year of Reconciliation to honor Beata Maria Ecclesiae Matre and was subsequently added to the Roman Missal.
 Litany of Loreto: In 1980, St. John Paul II added the Mother of the Church title to the Litany of Loreto, a highly indulgenced Marian litany commonly recited after the rosary.
 Catechism of the Catholic Church: The Catechism devotes paragraph 6 “Mary, Mother of Christ, Mother of the Church” (and subsequent subparagraphs) of Article 9 “I Believe in the Holy Catholic Church”, to her motherhood with regard to the Church as well: wholly united to her Son, in her Assumption, and also in the order of grace.
 Monastery founded: In the 1990s, St. John Paul II also founded the Mater Ecclesiaemonastery at the Vatican, which is where Pope Benedict XVI now lives.
 Pope Benedict: calls Mary, Mother of the Church, recalling Blessed Paul VI’s devotion.

So, what’s the purpose of this decree promulgating this obligatory memorial? According to the Vatican News, Cardinal Robert Sarah “said the Holy Father wishes to promote this devotion in order to “encourage the growth of the maternal sense of the Church in the pastors, religious and faithful, as well as a growth of genuine Marian piety”. Why now? Because, if ever we needed the help, direction, and example of our Blessed Mother in this world lacking a firm foundation in Christ Jesus, a world adrift in a morass of sin and moral relativism, a world which calls good evil and evil good, it is now.
May She ever be Our Mother!

https://catholicexchange.com/mary-mother-church
WE ARE PLANNING GIANT PARISH TAG SALE – It is time to clean out your attics and cellars and prepare for our annual giant tag sale—stay tuned for more information! Please drop off tag sale items at the rectory garage. If you have large pieces of furniture and need help, call the rectory. PLEASE NO televisions, computers, printers, mattresses, clothing or books. Please call Shirley Webb at 773-7202 if you have any questions.

PLEASE DON’T FORGET OUR GROCERIES for the Poor Project! Many people who are having a hard time come to the Rectory for help. Please help us to help them. It is a sad and heartbreaking thing to turn someone away when we run out of groceries! Any non-perishable items that you can spare will be greatly appreciated – canned hams, tuna fish, peanut butter, baked beans, dry milk, canned soups and stews, jam, crackers, juices, etc. Please leave them in the front vestibule of the church.

HOLY HOUR FOR THE SICK AND DYING – A Holy Hour is being observed each Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. in the Adoration Chapel at Blessed Sacrament Church in Greenfield. Included are the singing of hymns, recitation of the Rosary, and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy for the Sick and the Dying. The hour concludes with Benediction. If you know of someone who is ailing and in need of special graces and prayer, please be encouraged to come and spend an hour for his/her intention. All are welcome.

THE NEXT COMMUNITY MEAL WILL TAKE PLACE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 30TH! There will be a sign up sheet and pans available in the front vestibule by the beginning of May. Please contact Cathy Becklo with any questions, at acbecklo@comcast.net. We look forward to another successful dinner without a snowstorm getting in the way! God bless all the hearts and hands that make this a great program!

AS OUR GARDENS burst into bloom, please remember the altars in our church. All flowers are gladly accepted to decorate our altars. Please let Mary Kobera know what you have and when you will be bringing them so she can arrange the altars to glorify God and beautify the Mass.

HOLY HOUR FOR VOCATIONS Please come to a Holy Hour for Vocations on the second Sunday of every month at 7:00 p.m. in the Franklin County Adoration Chapel in Greenfield. Join us to pray for good priests and to thank Him for the good priests we now have. Call 773-8890 with any questions.

WEBSITE: ChroniclesofCzestochowa.wordpress.com Like us on Facebook

Ecce ancilla Domini: Music in the Sacred Liturgy
Part First: An Introduction to Sacred Music

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One of the most important, and controversial topics regarding the celebration of the Sacred Liturgy is the role of Sacred Music. In a way this is not surprising, as many of the Church Fathers had various reactions to Sacred Music at various points in their lives—some of them manifesting great spiritual conflicts within themselves (e.g. St. Augustine). Sacred Music is one of the most important aspects of the execution of the Sacred Liturgy, after the texts themselves, because it is the setting of those texts to music. Sacred Music has often been referred to as the “handmaid of the liturgy”—hence the title of this series of articles, taken from Luke’s account of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary: “Ecce ancilla Domini”—“Behold, I am the handmaid of the Lord”.
Sacred Music as always been held in highest esteem, being one of the most important Liturgical Arts, and yet has always, too, been subject to the greatest amount of abuse, which is why more Popes have spoken on Sacred Music than of any other art. Just in the past century, documents on Sacred Music have been promulgated by St. Pius X (Tra le sollecitudini, 1903), Pius XI, (Divini Cultus, 1928), Pius XII (Musicae Sacrae, 1955), Paul VI (Musicam Sacram, 1967), and John Paul II (Chirograph on Sacred Music, 2003); in addition, in many homilies and addresses, both Benedict XVI and Pope Francis have upheld all of these guidelines, and sought to foster the renewal and reform of true Sacred Music.
But what is Sacred Music? Does any religious music count? I feel the best way to answer this question is to quote directly from the Motu Proprio, Tra le sollecitudini of St. Pius X—the document upon which all subsequent Papal teaching on the matter of Sacred Music has been built—the Holy Father was himself an organist and choirmaster for much of his life before his elevation to the episcopacy, and what he says here comes not only from his theological and philosophical training, but also from his practical musical training; he speaks as a musician to musicians:

I General principles
1. Sacred music, being a complementary part of the solemn liturgy, participates in the general scope of the liturgy, which is the glory of God and the sanctification and edification of the faithful. It contributes to the decorum and the splendor of the ecclesiastical ceremonies, and since its principal office is to clothe with suitable melody the liturgical text proposed for the understanding of the faithful, its proper aim is to add greater efficacy to the text, in order that through it the faithful may be the more easily moved to devotion and better disposed for the reception of the fruits of grace belonging to the celebration of the most holy mysteries.
2. Sacred music should consequently possess, in the highest degree, the qualities proper to the liturgy, and in particular sanctity and goodness of form, which will spontaneously produce the final quality of universality.
It must be holy, and must, therefore, exclude all profanity not only in itself, but in the manner in which it is presented by those who execute it.
It must be true art, for otherwise it will be impossible for it to exercise on the minds of those who listen to it that efficacy which the Church aims at obtaining in admitting into her liturgy the art of musical sounds.
But it must, at the same time, be universal in the sense that while every nation is permitted to admit into its ecclesiastical compositions those special forms which may be said to constitute its native music, still these forms must be subordinated in such a manner to the general characteristics of sacred music that nobody of any nation may receive an impression other than good on hearing them.
Note the following:
• Sacred Music is complementary to the liturgy, it is not, therefore, an extraneous addition to fill time;
• It is to contribute to the decorum and splendor of the liturgy, that is, to the reverence and sacrality of the liturgy, and in this way fulfil its aim of the sanctification and edification of the faithful—not (N.B.) their entertainment;
• Its principal function is the proclamation of the liturgical texts themselves, not merely religious ones;
• The qualities it should possess are sanctity, goodness of form, and universality (or catholicity, if you will).
Now, knowing by what principles Sacred Music can be judged, I think it is safe to say that, no, not just any kind of religious music counts as truly Sacred Music. There are, and always have been, various styles of popular religious music, which have been used during non-liturgical devotions, processions, concerts, etc., and this is something that is important and should be cultivated. However, I find it particularly important that, where the liturgy is concerned, the principles outlined in this Motu Proprio must be followed as exactly as possible.
The liturgy is not something that we make (or remake) to suit particular times, cultures, ages, nations, etc., it is of its nature universal, and the music of the liturgy should also “be all things to all men”, that is, it should be objective, not subjective. In fact, many may not realize this, but just as the Church gives liturgical books to the priests and other sacred ministers, namely the Missal and Lectionary for Mass, and the Liturgy of the Hours (Breviary) for the Divine Office, so too, does the Church give liturgical books for the musicians: the Roman Gradual, Simple Gradual, and Kyriale for the Mass, and the Antiphonal for the Divine Office—the Church actually prescribes certain texts to be sung to certain melodies for each Mass, just as she prescribes certain prayers and readings, and all this together makes a marvelous whole.
The principles outlined by Pius X are foundational to the Church’s teaching on Sacred Music, and over the coming weeks I hope to go into greater detail on a number of these topics and the role of music in the Mass. This first installment is intended to act merely as a brief introduction to the topic, and next week I will be going more in depth on the qualities of Sanctity, Goodness of Form, and Universality, of which Pius X speaks, particularly in relation to Gregorian Chant; then move to the practical side of things regarding the music of the liturgy, namely the Ordinary and Proper of the Mass; the use of Hymns, Anthems, and Motets; and finally, the role of the Organ.
~ Henry Gaida, Director of Music
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THE KNIGHTS & LADIES OF ST. PETER CLAVER will hold their First Annual Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, October 27th, 2018, at the Bishop Marshall Center at St. Michael’s Cathedral. If anyone would like to rent a table, please call Lady Joy Danita Allen at 413-204-1553. The deadline for table rentals is October 1st—Don’t wait ‘til the last minute!

HOLY HOUR AND MINI RETREAT – Join us before the Blessed Sacrament for the Holy Hour and Mini Retreat of the Guard of Honor of the Sacred Heart. The Holy Hour is every Thursday and the Mini Retreat is the last Thursday of every month in our church following the 5:30 p.m. Mass from 6:15 – 7:15 p.m. with our Pastor, Fr. Séan O’Mannion, National Director of the Guard of Honor – USA.

THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL DIOCESAN-WIDE EUCHARISTIC ROSARY PROCESSION will take place on Sunday, June 3rd, 2018, (rain or shine) at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish at 99 King St. in Northampton, from 1-4 P.M., beginning with a talk given by Fr. Chris Alar, MIC, director of The Marian Helper Center, in Stockbridge, who will speak on “The Call to Holiness Through Divine Mercy, for the Family, the Domestic Church”. During his talk, there will be priests available for the Sacrament of Confession. At 2:00 P.M., we will begin our prayerful event with a Consecration of the Family to the Divine Mercy, followed by a Rosary Procession through downtown Northampton, returning to the church for the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, with a reception to follow. For more information, contact George or Brenda at (413) 221-4372.
OFFICE OF VOCATIONS: The first reading today tells of the apostles filling the vacancy made by the absence of Judas. Each generation must find its own successors to spread the Word of God to the next generation. Jesus prays “Father, as you have sent Me into the world, so I have sent them into the world”. Perhaps God is calling you to fill a vacancy in today’s Church. If you feel a call to a Church vocation, email Fr. Matt or Fr. Michael: vocations@diospringfield.org and/or visit our website: http://www.myvocation.com.

OUR LADY OF THE CROSS PARISH TAG SALE May 19 ~ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm; May 20 ~ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm, Rain or Shine, at Our Lady of the Cross Parish Hall, Holy Cross Ave. (off Dwight St., across from the church), Holyoke, 01040. Tons and tons of treasures for all ages! Something you really don’t want to miss! If you would like to set up a table on our front lawn to sell your own items, the cost is $25.00. To register to set a table up or for more information, please call 532-5661.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries. They will be offered as follows and you may attend the Masses here in our church as the Missionaries offer the Masses in their churches:

SUNDAY, MAY 13: 8:00 – Health & Blessings for Joseph Martin – int. Becklo Family
MONDAY, MAY 14: + Lauren Tela – int. Mom & Dad
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16: – Grace & Blessings for Fr. Charles Jan DiMascola
– int. Betty Fritz
FRIDAY, MAY 18: + Chet Galvis – int. Connie
SATURDAY, MAY 19: 4:00 + Anthony Adamski – int. Helen

PLEASE NOTE: The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help the Missionaries who often times receive very little help. It also helps the people where the Masses are offered. Bóg wam zapłać!

SPECIAL PROGRAMING NOTE FROM CATHOLIC COMMUNICATIONS Catholic Communications has announced programing changes for Real to Reel and Chalice of Salvation for the months of May and June for those viewing on WWLP-TV 22. Chalice of Salvation, the weekly televised Mass, will air at a special time of 6 a.m. on Sunday May 13 and again at 6 a.m. on June 10. Real to Reel will air on a special day and time of 6:30 a.m. on Sunday May 6 and Sunday May 20. Also Real to Reel will not air on Saturday, May 12. Please be sure to make a note of these special times and let your homebound friends know of the scheduled changes as well. Full versions of both programs can be viewed at http://www.iobserve.org starting the Monday after broadcast.
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Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,
And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them.

Julia Muszynski 5/13/1937
Guilitta Petetti 5/13/1991
Casimir F. Sojka 5/13/2003
Thomas J. Dombroski 5/13/2004
Eugene M. Maleski 5/14/1975
Ann Krejmas 5/14/1980
Wiktoria Koscinski 5/14/1961
Anthony Mieczkowski 5/15/1953
Wallace Kajduk 05/15/1965
Gladys P. Clark 5/15/2004
Stanley J. Wisnieski 5/15/2008
Catherine Schab 5/16/2000
Anna Lak 5/16/2005
John J. Duda, III 5/17/1998
Blanche Seremeth 5/17/2001
James Tucker 5/17/2001
Catherine Ptak 5/18/1942
John Pietraszek 5/18/1954
Walter Dobosz 5/18/1997
Alexander Rustallis 5/19/1954
Anna Warasz 5/19/1956
Germaine Buckmaster 5/19/1983
Anna M. Podmore 5/19/2007
Antonina Karp 5/20/1940
Francis Brzozowy 5/20/1951
John Dlugosz 5/20/1963

Remember the Holy Souls in Your Prayers
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PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments! Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA 01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010

PLEASE NOTE that every day of the month is set aside to pray for a specific priest or deacon of Franklin County. Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar. The intentions for this week are:

                      Sunday                   Monday                  Tuesday

                   Vocations              Deacon Bete            Deacon Leary

        Wednesday             Thursday                  Friday                     Saturday
      Fr. DiMascola          Fr. Lisowski       Bishop McDonnell      Fr. O’Mannion

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD and in memory of Claire M. Zak, a donation has been made to our Parish Renovation Fund by Helen Christian. Bóg zapłać!

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies.

 

+ PARISH SCHEDULE FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 6, 2018 +

SUNDAY, MAY 6 [Sixth Sunday of Easter]:
8:00 am¬¬ – Health & Blessings for Amber Ahearn – int. Geraldine & Richard Ahearn
10:30 am – Living & Deceased Members of the Holy Rosary Society
2:00 pm – May Devotions
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F. Fifth Sunday after Easter)
MONDAY, MAY 7:
8:00 am + Mr. & Mrs. John Cain – int. Dorothy Kosewicz
TUESDAY, MAY 8 [St. Camillus and St. Peregrine Novena]:
5:30 pm – Sebastian Baab – int. Elias Filipi
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 [St. Jude Novena]:
5:30 pm – Isaac Filipi – int. Elias Filipi
THURSDAY, MAY 10 [Ascension of the Lord]: ** Holy Day of Obligation **
* 8:00 am – Grace & Blessings for Henry Gaida – int. Betty Fritz
* 5:30 pm – Maria Filipi – int. Elias Filipi
FRIDAY, MAY 11 [Bl. Ladislaus of Gielniow]:
5:30 pm – Joshua Filipi – int. Elias Filipi
SATURDAY, MAY 12 [Ss. Nereus & Achilleus/St. Pancras]:
8:00 am + Casimir F. Sojka – int. John & Ted Sojka Families
4:00 pm + Mothers’ Day Novena I
6:00 pm (Spanish) – For our Parish and Parishioners
SUNDAY, MAY 13 [Seventh Sunday of Easter]: Mothers’ Day
8:00 am + Mothers’ Day Novena II
10:30 am + Mothers’ Day Novena III First Communion
4:00 pm – Vespers (E.F. Sunday after the Ascension)

+ KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIĘ ZA NAMI +

THE HOLY ROSARY SOCIETY will gather as a body for the 10:30 a.m. Mass on Sunday, May 6th. Following the Mass they will have a meeting with a pot luck dinner in the church undercroft. At 2:00 p.m. they will gather again in the church for May devotions with the Rosary and Benediction.

LADIES OF OUR PARISH interested in joining the Sisterhood of the Holy Rosary Society are invited to our meeting on Sunday, May 6th in the morning following the 10:30 Mass in the church undercroft. The Holy Rosary Society meets four times a year and is involved in charitable and spiritual activities throughout the year. There are also many spiritual benefits to membership.

MAY DEVOTIONS in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary will take place Sunday, May 6th at 2:00 p.m. Benediction and the Holy Rosary will be included.

THE MAY CROWNING of the Blessed Virgin Mary will take place at the 10:30 a.m. Mass on Sunday, May 6th.

THE ST. JUDE NOVENA is offered every Wednesday at the 5:30 p.m. Mass and all are welcome to come and ask for the help of this saint who is the patron of hopeless cases.

THE PARISH COUNCIL will meet on Wednesday, May 9th at 6:30 p.m. in the church undercroft. The tag sale will be discussed.

MAY 11th IS THE FEAST of Bd. Ladislaus (Władysław) of Gielniów. Bd. Ladislaus was born in 1440 and was well educated before becoming a Franciscan monk. He was a great preacher and missionary. He always warned his priests and brothers that the example of personal holiness must always come before the preaching of the Gospel.
Bd. Ladislaus is also responsible for the composition of many favorite Polish hymns. His prayers are believed to have saved Poland from a great army of invading Turks and Tartars. Ladislaus called upon the panic-stricken population to pray and to put their trust in God, who alone could deliver them. Suddenly a flood and freezing blizzard struck the invaders who were easily defeated.
On Good Friday, in 1505, as he was preaching to an immense congregation, he was miraculously lifted into the air and seemed to be mystically crucified. When he slowly sank to the ground he was so weak that he had to be carried to the monastery infirmary where he died a month later.

SATURDAY, MAY 12th is the Feast of Sts. Nereus and Achilleus who were Roman soldiers until their conversion to Christianity. As Christians they refused to take part in the brutality of the Roman army. They were martyred for their Faith. They will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 12th is also the Feast of St. Pancras who was of noble birth. He was baptized at the age of 14 and proceeded to give all his possessions to the poor. This drew the attention of the authorities to him and ultimately to the fact that he was a Christian. When he refused to denounce his Christianity, he was decapitated. He will also be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

THE WEEKLY PRO-LIFE NOVENA is offered every Saturday before the 8:00 a.m. Mass. All are invited to come and beg God for an end to the terrifying evil which is destroying our nation.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Claire Hughes for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish. We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

MOTHER’S DAY CARDS for our annual Mother’s Day Novena of Masses which will begin on Saturday, May 14th are presently available in the front vestibule. The Novena will continue for nine days of Masses for all Mothers living and departed.

A CHANGE IN OUR CHANGE FOR BABIES LENTEN PROGRAM For several years we have made saving our coins and dollars for Alternatives Pregnancy Center part of our Lenten almsgiving here at Our Lady of Czestochowa. This year we will be making a change! Change for Babies will move from Lent to Easter! Bottles will be available on the Second Sunday of Easter, April 15. They will be collected on May 6 & 13, the Sundays before and after the Feast of the Ascension. We look forward to participating in the Change for Babies program as our Easter giving this year!

WEBSITE: ChroniclesofCzestochowa.wordpress.com Like us on Facebook

THE ST JOHN PAUL II YOUTH GROUP will be attending the Steubenville East Youth Conference, July 13-15, in Lowell, MA. The conference is open to current 8th graders through graduating seniors. Each year around 30 youth from the area participate in this chance to grow in their faith. For more information, contact Ed or Suzi Cottrill at 413-772-6062 or stjpiiyouthgroup@gmail.com.

ALL CHILDREN OF OUR PARISH MAKING their First Communion will make their confession on Saturday, May 12th at 9:00 a.m. This will be followed by a rehearsal and a party. The children will receive their First Holy Communion on Sunday, May 13th at the 10:30 a.m. Mass. Pray for our children who for the first time will receive Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament into their hearts to be their Lord and Savior now and forever their friend and companion through life and eternity.

Please Pray for the
Children of our Parish who are Making their
First Holy Communion!

Hanna Marguerite Marie Blanchard
Grady James Deery
Samuel Thomas Eichorn
Emma Margaret Mary Germain
Nolan Michael Kalinowski
Eden Rose LaPlume
Jaiden Christopher Lapointe
Kimberly Angie Ramirez Martin
Dominic Anthony Martino
Angela Theresa Otrando
Grace Thérèse Rose-Fish
Anthony Patrick Seamans
Marius Joseph Sonntag
Lucja Jamie Webb Yagodzinski

 

PLEASE DON’T FORGET OUR GROCERIES for the Poor Project! Many people who are having a hard time come to the Rectory for help. Please help us to help them. It is a sad and heartbreaking thing to turn someone away when we run out of groceries! Any non-perishable items that you can spare will be greatly appreciated – canned hams, tuna fish, peanut butter, baked beans, dry milk, canned soups and stews, jam, crackers, juices, etc. Please leave them in the front vestibule of the church.

HEADSTONE CLEANING PROJECT The Confirmation Students of our parish will be cleaning headstones at our cemetery on Saturday, May 12th. If you would like to have the headstone(s) of your family washed, please sign-up on the sheet in the vestibule. For more information call: Larry Roux, 413-325-6172.

THE TERESIANS ARE STILL LOOKING for a few good men, women, or families willing to join us in the spiritual and corporal works of mercy. Out latest project is collecting “toiletries” from hotels. These will be offered at the OLC community meals. There is a marked container in the vestibule. Do NOT buy them. If you want to buy something, consider groceries for distribution from the rectory. Nancy Faller (nafaller@aol.com)

MOTHER’S DAY ROSES FOR LIFE – On Mothers’ Day weekend, May 12th and 13th, roses will be available at the doors of the church to benefit the Pro-Life cause in Franklin County. Donations will be $3.00 per rose / $30 per dozen. All proceeds to benefit pro-life events throughout the year.

HOLY HOUR FOR THE SICK AND DYING – A Holy Hour is being observed each Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m. in the Adoration Chapel at Blessed Sacrament Church in Greenfield. Included are the singing of hymns, recitation of the Rosary, and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy for the Sick and the Dying. The hour concludes with Benediction. If you know of someone who is ailing and in need of special graces and prayer, please be encouraged to come and spend an hour for his/her intention. All are welcome.

THE NEXT COMMUNITY MEAL WILL TAKE PLACE ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 30TH! There will be a sign up sheet and pans available in the front vestibule by the beginning of May. Please contact Cathy Becklo with any questions, at acbecklo@comcast.net. We look forward to another successful dinner without a snowstorm getting in the way! God bless all the hearts and hands that make this a great program!

AS OUR GARDENS burst into bloom, please remember the altars in our church. All flowers are gladly accepted to decorate our altars. Please let Mary Kobera know what you have and when you will be bringing them so she can arrange the altars to glorify God and beautify the Mass.

Let us go forward in peace, our eyes upon heaven, the only one goal of our labor.
~ St. Therese of Lisiuex

The Ascension, Jesus’ Priesthood, and the Mass
Shane Kapler

See the source image
For many who read the Gospels, Jesus’ Ascension seems to be the completion of His ministry. They are sorely mistaken, though. At the Ascension our Lord’s ministry reached new heights; He serves as humanity’s high priest before the Father in heaven. The Epistle to the Hebrews goes so far as to say that Christ “lives to make intercession” for us (Heb. 7:25). The very way that Jesus ascended into heaven speaks to this mystery.
Blessing was something familiar to every first century Jewish man and woman. Each day at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., as commanded in the Law, the Jewish priests celebrated the tamid, or “perpetual offering” (Ex. 29:38-41). One group of priests placed a lamb, cake of bread, and wine on the altar as another group of priests led the people in reciting the Ten Commandments and the Shema, and then signing the psalm designated for that day of the week. The tamid concluded with the priests gathering on the steps of the Holy Place, extending their arms out toward the people and invoking the blessing the Lord entrusted to Moses and Aaron: “The LORD [YHWH] bless you and keep you; the LORD make His face shine upon you, and be gracious to you: the LORD lift up His countenance upon you, and give you peace” (Num. 6:24-26).
When the apostles and other disciples saw Jesus begin to ascend into heaven, in the very act of blessing them, they understood that He was “climbing the steps” of the true Holy Place. Only one Jewish priest was allowed to enter the Holy Place at the time of the tamid, to burn incense before God’s earthly throne room, the Holy of Holies. The only person who could enter that room was the high priest, and he did so only once a year on the Feast of Yom Kippur. When the apostles saw Jesus disappear into a “cloud,” an Old Testament symbol of God’s presence (Acts 1:9; Ex. 13:31-32, 24:16-18; Num. 9:15-23), they understood that Jesus had entered into God’s heavenly throne room, the reality to which the Temple and the earthly Holy of Holies pointed (Ex. 25:9, 40; Heb. 8:5).
The worship of the Old Covenant — the Temple and its many sacrifices — find their fulfillment in Christ’s priesthood: his death, resurrection, and ascension (Heb. 10:1-7). Jesus continues to offer Himself to the Father, in his humanity, just as He has from all eternity in His divinity. Hebrews and the Book of Revelation show Jesus, the Lamb of God, making the true perpetual offering to the Father — Himself, through the glorious wounds of His Passion (Heb. 7:25, 9:24; Rev. 5:6-14). Jesus draws all of heaven, the angels and saints, into this great heavenly liturgy, causing them to offer themselves through, with, and in Him (Rev. 4:6-5:14).
This is the same liturgy that breaks through to earth, upon our altars, in the Eucharist. Through the sacrament of ordination, Christ presides in the person of His minister. As the fulfillment of Israel’s tamid, the bread and wine we offer are converted into the Lamb. We receive Christ Himself in Eucharistic communion, the same Christ who bodily entered into the glory of the Father. Our lives are to be compenetrated by His and every part united to His sacrifice to the Father (1 Cor. 10:16-18; Rom. 12:1). And when our priests pronounce the blessing over us before sending us forth, it is Christ who blesses – the same Christ who blessed the apostles before sending them out to convert the world.
To fully receive that blessing, the Pentecostal grace Christ poured out upon the infant Church, we should dispose ourselves in the same way they did – faithful prayer and meditation upon Scripture, in the company of the Blessed Mother (Luke 24:49; Acts 1:14-15).

THE KNIGHTS & LADIES OF ST. PETER CLAVER will hold their First Annual Christmas Bazaar on Saturday, October 27th, 2018, at the Bishop Marshall Center at St. Michael’s Cathedral. If anyone would like to rent a table, please call Lady Joy Danita Allen at 413-204-1553. The deadline for table rentals is October 1st—Don’t wait ‘til the last minute!

HOLY HOUR FOR VOCATIONS Please come to a Holy Hour for Vocations on the second Sunday of every month at 7:00 p.m. in the Franklin County Adoration Chapel in Greenfield. Join us to pray for good priests and to thank Him for the good priests we now have. Call 773-8890 with any questions.

HOLY HOUR AND MINI RETREAT – Join us before the Blessed Sacrament for the Holy Hour and Mini Retreat of the Guard of Honor of the Sacred Heart. The Holy Hour is every Thursday and the Mini Retreat is the last Thursday of every month in our church following the 5:30 p.m. Mass from 6:15 – 7:15 p.m. with our Pastor, Fr. Séan O’Mannion, National Director of the Guard of Honor – USA.

Be at peace with your own soul, then Heaven and earth will be at peace with you.
~ St. Jerome

Vestment Collection of
Our Lady of Czestochowa Parish

After our Solemn Masses for the Paschal Triduum and Easter, many people remarked on the beautiful vestments that were worn by the priests and sacred ministers, and asked if I could write an overview for the bulletin not only the provenance of some of these vestments, but also what they symbolize, and their uses in the sacred liturgy. This has been done in several installments over past few weeks, and will (hopefully) be followed by a series on the rôle of music in the Sacred Liturgy. This week we conclude with Part III, which deals with the rôles of the various Liturgical ministers. – Henry Gaida, Director of Music and Liturgy

Part III: The roles of the Celebrant, Sacred Ministers, and Servers at the Solemn Mass

One of the beauties of the Traditional Roman Mass—and of the celebration of the New Mass in the traditional manner—is the verticality and order of the celebration. Each has their role and function, and each according to an hierarchy of roles and functions. This part is intended to be a precis of the functions of the various liturgical ministers, from the Celebrant, to the Deacon, the Subdeacon, the Master of Ceremonies, etc., down to the servers at the celebration of the Solemn Mass . It should be mentioned from the beginning, that the proper liturgical understanding is that the Solemn Mass is the fullness of the Sacred Liturgy, and is the goal to which the Liturgy aspires: the other forms of Mass are arrived at by removing things from the Solemn Mass; not the other way around. Therefore, if you take away the sacred ministers (Deacon and Subdeacon), you get the High Mass; if you remove also the Cantor or Schola Cantorum, and simply recite all the texts, you get the Low Mass.

Celebrant: The principal function of the Celebrant is to address God on behalf of the people, particularly during the Canon of the Mass (Eucharistic Prayer).
The Celebrant’s duties at the Solemn Mass are:
• to lead the people in praying the Confiteor (I Confess…);
• to intone the Gloria (Glory to God in the highest);
• to pray the Collect on behalf of the people;
• to preach the homily (unless another priest is to do this);
• to lead the people in the recitation of the Creed;
• to introduce the Prayer of the Faithful and close this prayer with a collect;
• to offers the host and the chalice, and incense the gifts and the altar at the offertory;
• to pray the Eucharistic Prayer (Canon of the Mass), beginning with the preface—which concludes with the Sanctus; he then performs his most sacred function, namely that of consecrating the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ, fulfilling his role as the alter Christus (other Christ), in offering, in an un-bloody manner, Christ’s sacrifice of Himself on the Christ;
• to lead the people in the Our Father, and to pray the concluding prayer, asking for peace, which he then extends to the faithful (The peace of the Lord be with you always.);
• to breaks the Host and places a fragment into the Chalice (called the Fraction);
• to distribute Communion;
• to pray the Prayer after Communion and give the final Blessing.
Deacon: The principal function of the Deacon is to address the faithful, and to assist the priest. His duties are:
• to Proclaim the Gospel;
• to recite the petitions in the Prayer of the Faithful;
• to prepare the altar, arranging the corporal, the paten (with the host), and the Missal at the offertory;
• to pour the wine into the chalice, and add a drop of water;
• to assist the celebrant in the incensation of the altar;
• to invite the people to share a sign of peace with one another;
• to purify the vessels after communion and veils the chalice;
• to dismiss the people: “The Mass is ended, go in peace.” (or some form of the same).
Subdeacon: The function of the Subdeacon is to assist the deacon; his duties are:
• to proclaim the epistle (second reading; or if there is only one reading before the gospel, he proclaims it);
• to assist the deacon with the incensation of the Book of the Gospels;
• to bring the chalice to the altar at the offertory, and to assist the deacon in the preparation of the altar;
• to assist the celebrant in the incensation of the altar;
• to incense the host and chalice at the Elevations in the Eucharistic Prayer;
• to assist the deacon in the purification of the vessels and veiling the chalice.
• At certain times he also carries the processional cross.
Master of Ceremonies: The function of the Master(s) of Ceremonies is to make sure that everything runs smoothly. This is an extremely difficult job, and requires that he be not only paying attention to what is happening at that moment, but also know what everyone else is supposed to be doing next.

Servers: The function of the servers (Altar Boys) is to assist the celebrant and sacred ministers in their function: their principal task is bringing things to and from the altar for the use of the sacred ministers: Thurible (or Censer); Water and Wine cruets; pitcher and dish for the lavabo and the towel, etc.

Lector: The function of the lector (or reader, if a layperson), is to proclaim the Lesson (first reading; at non-solemn Masses, where there is no Subdeacon, they also proclaim the epistle/second reading).

Cantor and Schola Cantorum: The true liturgical function of the Cantor should not be confused with a generic kind of song-leader. The role of the Cantor and Schola Cantorum (choir) are laid out in the liturgical books: the Missal, the Lectionary, and the Roman Gradual. The duty of the Cantor/Schola, is to chant the Introit (Entrance Chant); intone the Kyrie; lead the Gloria; chant the verses of the Responsorial Psalm (or the Gradual); to chant the Alleluia & its verse (in Lent, replaced by a Tract); to chant the Offertory Responsory; to intone & lead the Sanctus; to intone & lead the Agnus Dei; and to chant the Communion Antiphon and Psalm. Note, however, that what is not on this list are Hymns, Motets, and Anthems, as they are not the liturgical texts of the Mass itself, but are extra additions to it. (More about this in the coming weeks).

* * *

There is a verticality, an ascension, a going up spiritually, which is made physically visible: the progression from the Lesson (Lector) to the Epistle (Subdeacon) to the Gospel (Deacon) to the Eucharistic Prayer (Celebrant). This is also seen in the traditional stances for the various parts of the Mass, particularly when celebrated ad orientem, that is, with the priest and people facing the same direction (this is also called versus Deum: literally facing God), as illustrated in the following picture from the Elevation of the Host at a Solemn Concelebrated Requiem Mass at St. Agnes’ Church is St. Paul, Minnesota: this is the Novus Ordo (New Mass since Vatican II).

Notice in this picture, how the principal Celebrant is standing at the Altar, the Deacon behind him to the right, assists him, and the Subdeacon, kneeling on the first step of the altar, incenses the Host, assisted by the Thurifer, to his right.

I hope that this little series on the Solemn Mass, however poorly written they have been, has helped illustrate some of the beauty of the Roman Liturgy, and given some information about some of the treasures which he have as a parish.

Next week, a series will begin on the role of Sacred Music in the Liturgy.
VISIT http://diospringfield.org/Ministries/child-youth-protection/ for resources for child abuse prevention and reporting.

THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL DIOCESAN-WIDE EUCHARISTIC ROSARY PROCESSION will take place on Sunday, June 3rd, 2018, (rain or shine) at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish at 99 King St. in Northampton, from 1-4 P.M., beginning with a talk given by Fr. Chris Alar, MIC, director of The Marian Helper Center, in Stockbridge, who will speak on “The Call to Holiness Through Divine Mercy, for the Family, the Domestic Church”. During his talk, there will be priests available for the Sacrament of Confession. At 2:00 P.M., we will begin our prayerful event with a Consecration of the Family to the Divine Mercy, followed by a Rosary Procession through downtown Northampton, returning to the church for the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Adoration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, with a reception to follow. For more information, contact George or Brenda at (413) 221-4372.

FREE MINISTRY TO TRAVELING CATHOLICS. For nationwide Mass Times and locations: call 1-800-Mass-Times (1-800-627-78460 or http://www.Masstimes.org.

TRAVEL TO BEAUTIFUL CATHOLIC BAVARIA with Fr. Henry Dorsch, Pastor of Our Lady of the Lake Church in Southwick, August 21-29, 2018. Visit historic city centers, picturesque villages, spectacular churches, a Marian shrine famous castles and fortresses along with fabulous scenery, including alpine. Some Masses included. For itinerary and further information email hlpdorsch@aol.com.

Our Lady of Fatima

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Note: The Feast of Our Lady of Fatima is normally celebrated on May 13th.
The famous apparitions of the Virgin Mary to the children of Fatima took place during the First World War, in the summer of 1917. The inhabitants of this tiny village in the diocese of Leiria (Portugal) were mostly poor people, many of them small farmers who went out by day to tend their fields and animals. Children traditionally were assigned the task of herding the sheep.
The three children who received the apparitions had been brought up in an atmosphere of genuine piety: Lucia dos Santos (ten years old) and her two younger cousins, Francisco and Jacinta. Together they tended the sheep and, with Lucy in charge, would often pray the Rosary kneeling in the open. In the summer of 1916 an Angel appeared to them several times and taught them a prayer to the Blessed Trinity.
On Sunday, May 13, 1917, toward noon, a flash of lightning drew the attention of the children, and they saw a brilliant figure appearing over the trees of the Cova da Iria. The “Lady” asked them to pray for the conversion of sinners and an end to the war, and to come back every month, on the 13th.
Further apparitions took place on June 13 and July 13. On August 13 the children were prevented by local authorities from going to the Cova da Iria, but they saw the apparition on the 19th. On September 13 the Lady requested recitation of the Rosary for an end to the war. Finally, on October 13, the “Lady” identified herself as “Our Lady of the Rosary” and again called for prayer and penitence.
On that day a celestial phenomenon also took place: the sun seemed to tumble from the sky and crash toward earth. The children had been forewarned of it as early as May 13, the first apparition. The large crowd (estimated at 30,000 by reporters) that had gathered around the children saw the phenomenon and came away astounded.
Official recognition of the “visions” which the children had at the Cova da Iria came on October 13, 1930, when the bishop of Leiria – after long inquiry – authorized the cult (meaning “pattern of devotional practices”) of Our Lady of the Rosary at the site. The two younger children had died: Francisco (who saw the apparition but did not hear the words) on April 4, 1919, and his sister Jacinta on February 20, 1920. Sister Lucia died on February 13, 2005, at her Carmelite convent in Coimbra, Portugal, after a long illness.
— Excerpted from Dictionary of Mary, Catholic Book Publishing Company.
MARK YOUR CALENDARS! The Parish Council is hosting a “Multicultural” Parish Pot-Luck Dinner on Saturday, May 19th, at 7:30 p.m. in the Undercroft. All parishioners are invited to make their favorite dishes—traditional family favorites are especially encouraged. There will be a sign-up sheet in the front vestibule. For more information please speak with Walter Hoszkiewicz or Elizabeth Guedez.

CHURCH CHOIRS: The St. Cecilia Choir and Choristers, which sings at the Sunday 10:30 Mass and other special services, is always seeking additional singers of any experience. Membership in the choir is open to all adults of the parish, and Choristerships are open to all Boys and Girls of the parish and community ages 7 – 13. The choir sings a variety of repertoire ranging from Gregorian Chant to music by the great masters, such as Palestrina, Mozart, and Schubert, to music by modern composers such as Ralph Vaughan Williams, Peter Kwasniewski, and Stephen Cleobury. We rehearse every Sunday in the choir loft following the 10:30 Mass, from 11:30 – 1:00. For information, please see Henry Gaida or e-mail hgaida@gmail.com.
The Saint Gregory Choir: So you didn’t take Latin in school? Most of us didn’t either! So you don’t read music? Many of us are still learning the basics! So you’re busy? So are we! Who are we? We call ourselves the St. Gregory Choir; we’re folk like you who like to sing to God’s greater glory. The music we sing is sophisticated, but we aren’t, and we need you. Don’t let flimsy excuses keep you from singing some of civilization’s greatest music–the Church’s vast treasury of chants, hymns, and polyphony (a fancy name for four part pieces). We rehearse for seventy-five minutes after the Saturday 8:00 AM Mass and twenty minutes before the Sunday first Mass. Come give it a try. No auditions, no experience necessary, and no solos the first twelve months. We promise! We sing at the 8:00 Sunday morning Mass. For more information, call Robert Heath at 772-8738.

OFFICE OF VOCATIONS: The greatest love story that ever happened: God’s continuing love for His people. All God asks is “Love one another as I have loved you”. What a great gift for any parent to have a son a priest and/or a daughter a religious sister. If you have the continuing inclination that God is calling you to be a priest or religious, email Fr. Matt or Fr. Michael: vocations@diospringfield.org and/or visit our website: http://www.myvocation.com.

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments! Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.
ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA 01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010

TWO PILGRIMAGES TO WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES – The World Meeting of Families will be held in Dublin, Ireland from August 21-26, 2018. Two great pilgrimages (8 or 12 day) are planned which include daily Mass and visits to numerous shrines (Knock, St. Peter, Nat’l. Shrine to St. Oliver Plunkett, St. Patrick’s Cathedral, St. Valentine, Venerable Matt Talbot, Tomb of Venerable John Sullivan, depending on which pilgrimage you choose) and many places of interest. For more information contact Grand View Tours at (610-361-7979), visit http://www.catholicsindublin.com, or contact Fr. Jonathan Reardon at Holy Family Parish in So. Deerfield (665-3254).

THE GREENFIELD KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, Council #133, are looking for golfers, sponsors and raffle donations for their 5th annual charity golf tournament to be held on Friday, May 4th at Crumpin-Fox golf course in Bernardston. Crumpin-Fox was voted No. 1 Public Access Golf Course in Massachusetts by New England Golf Monthly!
The event will be an 18 hole, 4-person scramble with tee advantages for senior golfers. The entry fee of $115 includes greens fees, carts, lunch and dinner and prizes for the winners. Dinner-only tickets are available for $30. Two raffles and a silent auction will also take place and include: $1000 cash, Jewelry, Red Sox tickets, 3-day Cape Cod vacation, Crumpin-Fox golf certificates and much, much more. Pioneer Volvo Cars of South Deerfield is sponsoring a “Hole-in-One” contest for a chance to win a new car.
The proceeds from the event will be used to fund a number of Council #133’s worthy causes in Greenfield and Franklin County. To sign up or to get more information, call Jason Semaski at (413) 626-3378, Lou Grader at (413) 774-2848 or Bob Wanczyk at (413) 774-2465.

CHARITABLE GIVING STRATEGY FOR RETIREES WITH IRA ACCOUNTS AFTER 2018 TAX REFORM: Most retirees will not be able to reduce their income taxes when making donations to their parish or other charities because of the increase in the standard deduction amount under the recent tax reform legislation. For those with IRA accounts, if donations are made directly from the IRA provider to the charitable organization or parish, the donation is effectively tax deductible since the donation is not considered taxable income to the IRA account holder. This strategy might also reduce income taxes on Social Security benefits for some tax payers. Contact your IRA provider for more information on how to do this. If you use an accountant, be sure to let your accountant know if you have taken advantage of this strategy.

DID YOU KNOW??? Poland’s national anthem is Dąbrowski’s Mazurka. The anthem, commonly known as “Jeszcze Polska nie zginęla” (“Poland Has Not Yet Perished”), was written in 1797 by Jozef Wybicki. The anthem was composed in Italy, where Polish troops were fighting at the side of Napoleon.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries. They will be offered as follows and you may attend the Masses here in our church as the Missionaries offer the Masses in their churches:

SUNDAY, MAY 6: 8:00 – All Living & Deceased Priests – int. The Shaughnessys
SUNDAY, MAY 6: 10:30 – Grace & Blessings for Rev. Mr. Joseph Roy Almeida, on his Ordination to the Transitional Diaconate – int. Nancy Faller
MONDAY, MAY 7: – Grace & Blessings for Henryk Robert Gaida – int. Nancy Faller
TUESDAY, MAY 8: – Grace & Blessings for all those who so generously made our new ceiling possible: Eli, Anna, Isaac, Maria, Joshua & Xavier Filipi; Justin Roux; Lucas & Sebastian Baab; Gabe LaPlume
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9: – In Thanksgiving – The Shaughnessys
THURSDAY, MAY 10: + Bernie Kobera – int. Mary
FRIDAY, MAY 11: – Grace & Blessings for Jeannie Marie Acinapura Schmelzenbach
– int. Nancy Faller
SATURDAY, MAY 12: 8:00 – Grace & Blessings for Fr. Edward Patrick Young, on his 25th Anniversary of Ordination – int. Nancy Faller
SATURDAY, MAY 12: 4:00 + George B. & Ursula E. Faller – int. Nancy Faller

PLEASE NOTE: The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help the Missionaries who often times receive very little help. It also helps the people where the Masses are offered. Bóg wam zapłać!

CATHOLIC YOUTH AND FAMILY DAY Mark your calendar to join us for our 3rd Annual Catholic Youth and Family Day at Six Flags New England on Friday, August 10, 2018. The day begins in the Rivers Edge Picnic Grove with music at 9am followed by a 9:30am mass celebrated by the Most Rev. Mitchell T. Rozanski, Bishop of Springfield. Then you will have the day to enjoy the park. There is a special package price of only $44.24 which includes park admission, a buffet lunch from 12:30-1:30pm, and free parking. Tickets can be purchased online at sixflags.com/newengland using promo code: Catholicday18. For more information, call Joanne McCormick, Special Events Coordinator, Six Flags, at 413-786-9300 x3524 or Gina Czerwinski, Director of Catechetics and Youth Formation, Diocese of Springfield, at 413-452-0677.
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Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,
And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them.

George Kabaniec 5/6/1927
Wojtreck Podosek 5/6/1946
Joseph Pogoda 5/6/1963
Bronislawa Tranowski 5/6/1968
Joan B. Gardner 5/7/1992
Blanche C. Potosek 5/7/2002
Herman J. Letourneau, Jr. 5/7/2003
Brenda V. Fleury 5/7/2008
Edmund Wasileski 5/8/1967
Edna K. Gulo 5/8/1991
Stanislaw Prochowicz 5/9/1956
Joseph J. Meciek 5/9/1970
Stanley J. Tuvek 5/9/1988
Kyoung-Shik Chung 5/9/1983
Ignaz Cyhowski 5/10/1976
Valentine Sojka 5/10/1995
Anna P. Zak 5/10/1996
Mary Byk 5/11/1959
Julia C. Stevens 5/11/2008
Stephen Kulch 5/12/1970
Frank J. Wojtkowski 5/12/1994
Julia Muszynski 5/13/1937
Guilitta Petetti 5/13/1991
Casimir F. Sojka 5/13/2003
Thomas J. Dombroski 5/13/2004

Remember the Holy Souls in Your Prayers
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SPECIAL PROGRAMING NOTE FROM CATHOLIC COMMUNICATIONS Catholic Communications has announced programing changes for Real to Reel and Chalice of Salvation for the months of May and June for those viewing on WWLP-TV 22. Chalice of Salvation, the weekly televised Mass, will air at a special time of 6 a.m. on Sunday May 13 and again at 6 a.m. on June 10. Real to Reel will air on a special day and time of 6:30 a.m. on Sunday May 6 and Sunday May 20. Also Real to Reel will not air on Saturday, May 12. Please be sure to make a note of these special times and let your homebound friends know of the scheduled changes as well. Full versions of both programs can be viewed at http://www.iobserve.org starting the Monday after broadcast.

PLEASE NOTE that every day of the month is set aside to pray for a specific priest or deacon of Franklin County. Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar. The intentions for this week are:

               Sunday                             Monday                        Tuesday                        Wednesday

           Msgr. Yargeau                     Vocations                 Fr. Bombardier                  Fr. Reardon

            Thursday                                  Friday                                              Saturday
            Fr. Lunney                           Pope Francis                              Deacons Ordained today

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies.