Bulletin: January 17, 2021

+ Parish Schedule for the Week January 17, 2021+

+ JMJ +

Sunday,January 17 [Second Sunday in Ordinary Time]:

    8:00 am + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Debbie Herk

 10:30 am + Robert Newcombe – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

Monday, January 18 [Blessed Regina Protmann]

   8:00 am + Adrienne Kostecki Tocco – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

Tuesday, January 19:

  5:30 pm + Barbara Cook – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

Wednesday, January 20 [St. Fabian, Pope and Martyr][St. Sebastian, Martyr]:

  5:30 pm – Living and Deceased Members of the Parda Family – int. Don Parda

Thursday, January 21 [St. Agnes, Virgin and Martyr]:

  5:30 pm + Catherine Ann Elliott – int. Grandson

Friday, January 22 [St. Vincent, Deacon and Martyr]:

  5:30 pm + Elizabeth Bower – int. Jim and Cyndi Newcombe

Saturday, January 23 [Martyrs of Podlasia: Blessed Vincent Lewoniuk and his 12 Companions]:

 8:00 am + Fr. Bruno and All Living and Deceased Members of the St. Joseph Chapter of the

        Discalced Carmelites Secular

11:00 am – WEDDING – Emma Jean Newcombe Rogers and Jacob Barrett Cashin

 4:00 pm + 8th Anniversary, David W. Phillips – int. Tina Phillips 

 6:00 pm – Spanish Mass –  int. Missa Pro Populo (for our Parish and Parishioners)

Sunday,January 24 [Third Sunday in Ordinary Time]:

    8:00 am – Grace and Blessings Elaine Lawton – int. Debbie Herk

 10:30 am + Eva White – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

BANNS OF MARRIAGE:  Emma Jean Newcombe Rogers and Jacob Barrett Cashin

+ Królowo Polski Módl Się za Nami +

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20th is the Feast of two early Christian Martyr/Saints:  Pope St. Fabian and St. Sebastian.  St. Fabian was an early Pope and was called “an incomparable man” by St. Cyprian.  He died for his Faith in the year 250 A.D.  St. Sebastian, patron saint of athletes, died speaking out in defense of the Faith.  Both saints will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 21st is the Feast of St. Agnes, a twelve year old girl who courageously died for the love of her Savior at the beginning of the fourth century.  This child martyr will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 22ND

   A Day of Prayer and Penance

for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children

Friday, January 22nd is the Anniversary of the infamous Roe v Wade decision to commit genocide on future generations.  Everyday over 3,000 babies are killed by abortion in the 

U. S. alone.  That is over 1 million American babies murdered every year and over 60 million since the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.  During the time it takes you to read this bulletin five babies, unique and innocent will fall victim to the abortion slaughter in this country.  Think of it, among the millions, a scientist who had a cure for viruses like COVID-19 and cancer, a politician who would have solved our economic and societal problems, a saint who would have shown us the way to world peace, an artist who would have moved hundreds to ecstasy.  Think of the loss to humanity.  We are destroying humanity.  In great societies they are not murdered, they commit suicide.  This is what we doing. Friday, January 22nd, is a Day of Penance and Prayers to ask God’s mercy for the terrible sin and slaughter of abortion which has been championed by both politicians and the public in our nation.   Let us pray and fast that God will turn away His justice and look with mercy on the United States of America.

THE PRO-LIFE NOVENA will continue on Saturday, January 23rd before the 8:00 a.m. Mass.  All are welcome to pray in supplication for an end to the violence of abortion and in reparation for our apathy towards this legalized evil and lack of love which makes abortion acceptable in our nation.

HOLY HOUR OF ADORATION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT – To ensure proper coverage of the Blessed Sacrament during exposition on Tuesdays through Fridays, Adoration will begin one half hour later at 4:30 pm and end with Benediction at 5:30 pm.  However, the church will be opened at 3:00 pm for private prayer.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 23RD is the anniversary of the Martyrs of Podlasia, the massacre of thirteen peasant men and boys who died defending a little Greek Catholic church in what is now Poland. They gathered, with their families and neighbors, to prevent the Russian Imperial government from imposing an Orthodox priest into their parish. This took place when the Tsar destroyed the last Greek Catholic eparchy in the empire, Chelm, in 1873 – 1875. Deportations had already begun of clergy and lay leaders who were sent off in long columns on foot to Siberia.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Kathi Eichorn for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, January 17:   8:00 + Louis Kozloski – int. Wanda Kozloski & Family

Sunday, January 17: 10:30 + Alexander & Bronislawa Garamin–int. Wanda Kozloski & Family 

Monday, January 18: 8:00 + Louis & Mary Kozloski – int. Wanda Kozloski & Family

tuesday, January 19: 5:30 – Parda Family – int. Don Parda

wednesday, January 20:  5:30 + Larry Krejmas, Sr. – int. Cyndee & Dennis Grader

thursday, January 21: 5:30 + Genevieve Grader – int. Cyndee & Dennis Grader

Friday, January 22: 10:30 + Agnes Golembeski – int. Don Parda & Family

Saturday, January 23: 8:00 – Grace & Blessings for Addison Bergeron

                                                 – int. Cyndee & Dennis Grader

Saturday, January 23: 4:00 + Larry Krejmas, Jr. – int. Cyndee and Dennis Grader

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Fr. GoniDeacon RabbittDeacon O’ConnorFr. CampoliFr. DiMascolaDeacon NolanOur DeaconCandidates


OMNIS TERRA : SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

PROPER OF THE MASS : TEXTS, AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00

All the earth shall bow down before you, O God, and shall sing to you, shall sing to your name, O Most High!

(Psalm 65:4; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and

Solemnities, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

10:30

All the earth shall worship Thee, and shall sing unto Thee, O God.  They shall sing to Thy name; O Thou Most High.

(Psalm 65:4; Graduale Romanum, Introits and Graduals for the Church Year, Healey Willan)

GRADUAL

10:30

The Lord sent forth his word to heal them and to snatch them from destruction. V/: Let them give thanks to the Lord for his kindness, and his wondrous deeds to the children of men.

(Psalm 106:20, 21; Graduale Romanum, Complete English Propers for the High Mass,

Rev. Paul Arbogast)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

Shout with joy to God, all the earth; sing a psalm to his name.  Come and hear, all who fear God, and I will tell you what great things the Lord has done for my soul. (Alleluia.)

(Psalm 65:1, 2, 16; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

COMMUNION

4:00 & 8:00

You have prepared a table before me, and how precious is the chalice that quenches my thirst.

(Psalm 22:5; Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

10:30

Andrew said to his brother Simon: “We have found the Messiah” which means Christ; and he led him to Jesus.

(John 1:41, 42; Graduale Romanum, Simple English Propers, Adam Bartlett)

THE SECOND SUNDAY in Ordinary Time takes its texts primarily from those of the Second Sunday after Epiphany in the Traditional Calendar.  As such, the Mass for this and the following Sundays continue on the theme of the Manifestation (i.e. Epiphany) of Christ.  In the Gospel of Year B (the current Sunday Lectionary Cycle in the Novus Ordo Mass), a passage from the Gospel of John, St. John the Baptist points to Jesus as being ‘the Lamb of God’.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) of this Sunday’s Mass continues the joyful charcter of the Epiphany season.  Emmanuel, God-with-us, is throughout this and the following weeks continually manifesting himself in his Divine Nature as the Messiah.  The text, taken from Pslam 65, within the context of todays liturgy, addressed Christ, who will be worshiped and adored by the whole earth.

    The chant, a new composition, is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian) which the Mediaeval music theorist Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050) describes as the ‘perfect’ mode, which is appropriate, as Christ being True God and true man, is the perfect man, whose human will is conformed completely with His Divine Will.  Further, this  mode is called ‘very happy’ by Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688), which is, of course, appropriate for this joyful time of Epiphany-tide.  The melody of the chant is rather simple, but has some nice word-painting, and is a fine example of a chant which builds upon the style of the Hebrew poetry of the psalter.  The verses of psalms are constructed in two parts, what is called parallelism: often the second half is an amplification of the first, other times, as with this passage, it is a complimentary sentiment, and this is echoed in the music: In the first phrase, ‘all the earth shall bow down’, the melody descends to the lowest notes of the range; and rises to the highest in the second phrase, ‘and shall sing to you…’.

    The setting by Anglo-Canadian composer Healey Willan (1880-1968) sung at the 10:30 Mass, is a modern composition, but one which takes inspiration from the modal music of the Church.  This setting is in the Fourth Mode (Hypophrygian), like the original Gregorian setting, which is connected with the Gift of Knowledge—appropriate as during Epiphany-tide we come to know who Christ is; This mode is called ‘harmonious’ by Guido d’Arezzo, and ‘tender’ by Adam von Fulda (1445-1505), and this is reflected in the music, which rises slowly to a climax at ‘and shall sing unto thee’, and descends slowly again to the finalis.

The Gradual Responsory (sung at the 10:30 Mass), is a simple setting of the text from Psalm 106.  While this text is not directly related to the readings of the day, it is to the time of the Church Year: A reminder that God did indeed send His Word to heal us.  The chant is in the Eigth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is connected to the Gift of Wisdom, and called ‘perfect’ by d’Arezzo, and ‘very happy’ by Espinosa.  The melody of the Respond is based on a family of Antiphons from the Divine Office.  The Respond will be repeated after the Verse.

Turning to the Offertory, we have another passage from Psalm 65 (from which the Introit was taken): Shout with joy to God, all the earth.  In this chant, as the 19th Century Abbot Dom Prosper Gueranger (O.S.B.) notes in his Liturgial Year: ‘During the Offertory, the Church resumes her songs of joy and give free course to her holy transports.  All faithful souls are invited by her to the celebration of the adorable Mystery, the intimate union of man with God.’  This chant is in the First Mode (Dorian), which Espinosa describes as being ‘happy’, and which is connected with the Holy Spirit.  The original Gregorian melody is highly melismatic (having many notes per syllable: as many as 50 in  one instance), and several textual repeats.  The simplified English setting sung here, is no less joyous: Seen in the large leap at the beginning, and in the use of the upper range of the mode.

There are several options for the Communion chant for this Sunday’s Mass in both the Missal and the Gradual.  One option from the Missal is a setting of a passage from Pslam 22 (23), one of the most popular Psalms: You have set a table before me.  This is, of course, a very appropriate text for the Communion of the Mass.  It is set in the Sixth Mode (Hypolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Counsel: d’Arezzo calls this mode ‘devout’, and Adam von Fulda describes it as ‘pious’—appropriate for the liturgical position of this Chant in today’s Mass, and sentiments reflected in the melody, which is modest in scope, remaining primarily in the mid-range of the mode.

    The option for the Communion from the Graduale is a passage from the day’s Gospel, narrating the calling of Andrew and Peter.  This is one of a number of narrative communion antipons, taken from the Gospel of the day.  The chant is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), and is modest in scope, allowing the story to be narrated rather unencumbered.  Verses of Psalm 33 (the Eucharistic Psalm) are sung between the Antiphon and its repetition.

At the 10:30 Mass, the chants of the Mass Ordinary will be taken from several places.  The Kyrie is from Mass XI of the Kyriale Romanum, which is suggested for Sundays of Ordinary Time—this Mass is known by the Trope of the Kyrie: Orbis factor: Maker of the world.  This chant is in the First Mode (Dorian), and dates from the XIV century.  The Sanctus & Agnus Dei are from Mass XVII of the Kyriale, which in some older books are suggested for the Sundays of the Year.  Both of these chants are in the Fifth Mode (Lydian).  The Sanctus dates from the XI century; the Agnus Dei from the XIII.  The Glory to God, sung in English, is a setting in the Sixth Mode by American Church musician Ralph Bednarz, and was composed in 2014.

Cardinal Mueller: Catholic politicians must fight abortion, euthanasia

Cardinal Gerhard Mueller. EWTN photo.

Rome Newsroom, Oct 8, 2020 / 05:43 pm MT (CNA).- Catholic politicians have an obligation to fight against abortion and euthanasia, while applying the whole of Catholic social teaching in their political work, Cardinal Gerhard Mueller, prefect emeritus of the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, said this week.

Catholic politicians, the cardinal told CNA Oct. 7, “have to fight abortion and euthanasia. The pope, the congregations and the bishops have said that we cannot accept euthanasia in civil society because it is contrary to life, or abortion because it means the death of the innocent child in the mother’s womb.”

 “Each life of the individual man has an absolute value in itself,” the cardinal continued, adding that politicians can “call themselves Catholics only if they accept this obligation to fight for the fundamental principles of social ethics, which are human rights.”

These human rights, Mueller said, cannot be redefined according to one’s own preferences.

“[I]t cannot be said that a woman has the right to kill the child in her womb, because this child is a human existence that has its own absolute value, and this is the principle of fundamental morality and the logic of the human intellect,” he said.

Without respecting this principle, society slips into Social Darwinism, promoting “survival of the fittest” rather than innate human dignity, he warned.

The cardinal stressed that Catholic politicians have great responsibilities in democracies, as well as in dictatorships, where they have an obligation to fight for human dignity and freedom.

“Catholic politicians must promote natural law, the principles of fundamental ethics, also all of the social doctrine of the Church, all efforts for universal peace,” he said.

“They cannot promote economic warfare against others,” the cardinal added.

While the Church teaches that human rights come from God, Mueller said, even those who do not believe in God can understand simply through their intellect that human lives are not to be used and manipulated.

“Every life of every man is sacred,” he said.

_______________________________________________________________________

PRAYER TO OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE, PATRONESS OF THE UNBORN

Virgin of Guadalupe,
Patroness of unborn children,
we implore your intercession
for every child at risk of abortion.
Help expectant parents to welcome from God
the priceless gift of their child’s life.Our Lady of Guadalupe

Console parents who have lost that gift
through abortion,
and lead them to forgiveness and healing
through the Divine Mercy of your Son.

Teach us to cherish
and to care for family and friends
until God calls them home.
Help us never to see others as burdens.

Guide our public officials
to defend each and every human life
through just laws.
Inspire us all to bring our faith into public life,
to speak for those who have no voice.

We ask this in the name of your Son,
Jesus Christ, who is Love and Mercy itself.
Amen

Responsorial Psalm                    Ps 40:2, 4, 7-8, 8-9, 10

R. (8a and 9a) Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I have waited, waited for the LORD,
    and he stooped toward me and heard my cry.
And he put a new song into my mouth,
    a hymn to our God. 
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
Sacrifice or offering you wished not,
    but ears open to obedience you gave me.
Holocausts or sin-offerings you sought not;
    then said I, “Behold I come.”
R. Here I am, Lord; I come to do your will.
“In the written scroll it is prescribed for me,
to do your will, O my God, is my delight,
    and your law is within my heart!”
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.
I announced your justice in the vast

    I did not restrain my lips, as you, O LORD, know.
R. Here am I, Lord; I come to do your will.

Eternal rest grant unto them o Lord,

 AND LET YOUR PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM!

Bronislawa Banach 1/17/1928

Stanisława Okula 1/17/1930

John Sobolewski 1/17/1992

Donald J. Menard 1/19/2015

Carolyn H. Kendrow 1/19/2018

Walter H. Waraksa 1/20/1992

Dean E. Matherson 1/20/2014

Stanislaus Bienkunski 1/21/1926

Peter Okula 1/21/1963

Roman Denkiewicz 1/21/1970

Sophie S. Olchowski 1/21/1991

Charles J. Sokoloski 1/21/2006

Genevieve Zukowski 1/22/1929

Mary Plona 1/22/1941

Edward Molongoski 1/22/1944

Mary Krol 1/22/1963

Rev. Joseph Szczepaniak 1/22/1971

Frank Dzeima 1/22/1976 

Gladys M. Dejnak 1/22/1991

Genowefa Zebert 1/22/2001

Alice Osowski 1/22/2006

Erleen M. Chabot 1/22/2006

Lawrence S. Filiault 1/22/2011

Alice M. Fugere 1/22/2011

Patricia E. Sobieski 1/22/2011

Stephen J. Nicewicz 1/23/1986

Stanley Bialecki 1/23/1994

Blanche Piepiora 1/23/2007

Stanislaus Duda 1/24/1941

Chester E. Makofsky 1/24/1988

Louise J. Hoynoski 1/24/2018



Remember the Holy Souls in Your Prayers

Bulletin: January 10, 2021

+

+ Parish Schedule for the Week January 10, 2021+

+ JMJ +

Sunday,January 10: [The Baptism of the Lord]:

    8:00 am + Jewel Scherman – int. Ron & Monica Scherman

 10:30 am + David Voorhis – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

Monday, January 11: 

   8:00 am + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Melissa Wright

Tuesday, January 12:

  5:30 pm + Mary Elizabeth Garmalo – int. Son

Wednesday, January 13 [St. Hilary, Bishop and Doctor of the Church]:

  5:30 pm + Jean Newcombe – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

Thursday, January 14:

  5:30 pm – Grace and Blessings for President Donald Trump – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

Friday, January 15:

  5:30 pm + Joseph & Helen Kostecki – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

Saturday, January 16:

 8:00 am + Phyllis Borden – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

 4:00 pm + Blanche Siwizki – int. Family 

 6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday,January 17:

    8:00 am + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Debbie Herk

 10:30 am + Robert Newcombe – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

+ Królowo Polski Módl Się za Nami +

JANUARY 10th COMMEMORATES the Baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan by St. John the Baptist.  In some parts of Poland an unusual custom is celebrated.  An ice hole is cut in a pond or river near the church and an altar is made out of the chunks of ice.  The ice crystal altar is decorated with evergreens and ribbons.  A procession from the church to the ice altar is held with banners and icons carried reverently and hymns and incense rising up to heaven.  A short prayer service is held and then the water in the ice hold is blessed as a reminder of the Baptism of Jesus.

     In some villages, as soon as the water is blessed, the young men plunge into the ice water.  Each submerging his head three times and then jumping out of the water is covered with a heavy fur coat.  This curious ritual has the double meaning of commemorating the Baptism of Jesus as well as a prayer-act for the man’s good health.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13th is the Feast of St. Hilary who was a convert from paganism, became a Bishop and a great leader in church orthodoxy.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

THE WEEKLY NOVENA TO ST. JUDE will be prayed at the 10:30 a.m. Mass on Wednesday, January 13th.  This is a continuing Novena and may be begun at any time.  All are welcome and encouraged to come and pray for the intercession of the saint of hopeless and impossible cases.

THE PRO-LIFE NOVENA will continue on Saturday, January 16th before the 8:00 a.m. Mass.  All are welcome to pray in supplication for an end to the violence of abortion and in reparation for our apathy towards this legalized evil and lack of love which makes abortion acceptable in our nation.

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD and in Memory of Stanley Kaczenski, donations have been made to our Parish Renovation Fund by the Franklin County Chiefs of Police Association.    Bóg zapłać!

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Margaret Bates for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, January 10:   8:00 – Living and Deceased Members of the Parda Family 

                                              – int. Don Parda

Sunday, January 10: 10:30 + Chet Galvis – int. Connie

Monday, January 11: 8:00 + Mary Kobera – int. Holy Rosary Society

tuesday, January 12: 5:30 + Rick Gamelin – int. Kathy and Joanne

wednesday, January 13:  5:30 + Bernie Plaza – int. Family

thursday, January 14: 5:30 + Donna and George Cushing – int. Eichorn Family

Friday, January 15: 10:30 – Grace & Blessings for Pat Jamrog – int. Betty Fritz

Saturday, January 16: 8:00 + Louis A. Kozloski – int. Wanda Kozloski & Family

Saturday, January 16: 4:00 + Agnes Golembeski – int Don Parda and Family

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

POLISH CHRISTMAS CAROLS are sung until the 2nd of February.  The Christmas season, for the Polish people, starts on Christmas Eve.  Advent is Advent — a time of preparation and anticipation.  Unlike many Western cultures, where Christmas carols and celebrations begin by December 1st, the Polish people spend that time in prayerful waiting.  The time after Christmas is the time for

celebration.Koledy

    Unlike the Christmas songs of other countries, the Polish carol (called a Kolęda) is not only a prayer but it is also a story — a kind of musical drama telling of the miraculous birth of Jesus.  These Kolędy are a musical expression of genius and profound religious conviction.  Many Polish carols date from the early 17th century and reflect, not only the folk culture of the day, but the royal and courtly life of the nobility.

    The word Kolęda is taken from the Latin word meaning the first day of the month and reflects the ancient custom of pre-Christian feasts in mid-winter.  With the coming of Christianity, the theme became the birth of Jesus.

    Many of the Kolędy are based on the majestic Polonez, a royal and stately dance from the courts of Polish kings.  One such Kolęda, “W Złobie Leży” was based on the Polonez played at the coronation of Wladyslaw IV (1632 – 1648).

    Adam Mickiewicz, in writing about the beauty of Polish Christmas carols, said:  “I doubt whether there is another country which can boast of such a collection of carols as Poland has.  It would not be easy to find any other nation’s poetry with feelings so pure, of such an extreme sweetness and delicacy.”

THE BAPTISM OF THE LORD: FIRST SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANT

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00

After the Lord was baptized, the heavens were opened, and the Spirit descended upon him like a dove, and the voice of the Father thundered: This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.

(Cf. Matthew 3: 16-17; Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel F. Weber, O.S.B.)

10:30

After the Lord was baptized, the heavens were opened, and the Spirit descended upon him like a dove, and the voice of the Father thundered: This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.

(Cf. Matthew 3: 16-17; Roman Missal, Choral Missal, Richard Rice)

GRADUAL

10:30

Thou hast loved righteousness, and hast hated iniquity. V/. Wherefore God, even thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness.

(Psalm 44: 8; Graduale Romanum, The Plainchant Gradual, G. H. Palmer, Francis Burgess, & R. L. Shields)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.  We have blessed you from the house of the Lord.  The Lord is God, and he has shown upon us, alleluia.

(Psalm 117: 26. 27; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

COMMUNION

4:00, 8:00 & 10:30

All of you who have been baptized in Christ have put on Christ, alleluia.

(Galatians 3: 27; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

THE SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY is celebration of the second Epiphany: the Baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River.  With this Mass, the Christmas cycle comes to a close, while the ‘Epiphany cycle’ commences: In the coming weeks, the theme of the old Sundays after Epiphany are very much present, as the various Manifestations (Epiphanies) of Christ to the world are recounted in the Gospels of the first few Sundays of Ordinary Time.

    In the more ancient form the Roman Rite, this feast is celebrated on January 13th: the Octave Day of the Epiphany.  Sadly, in the liturgical reforms under Popes Pius XII and John XXIII the very ancient Octave of Epiphany was removed, though this Feast remained on the 13th; in the Pauline reforms, this Feast was moved to the Sunday after the Epiphany.  One of the ironic results of the moving of the Solemnity of the Epiphany in the United States from its proper fixed date of January 6th to the Sunday between January 2nd and 8th, is that the Baptism of the Lord is nearly always celebrated the following Sunday: Creating a kind of faux Octave of the Epiphany.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) sung this Sunday is taken from the Roman Missal: it is a text based on the account of the Baptism in the Gospel of Matthew.  The plainchant setting sung at the 8:00 Mass is by Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B., and is in the Seventh Mode (Mixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Understanding, and is called the ‘Angelical’ mode by the Mediaeval music theorist Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050).  The joyfulness of this mode is exemplified by the exuberant opening phrase, which immediately leaps up from the finalis or tonic of the mode to the dominant, and remains in the upper range of the mode through the first phrase: This opening figure is purposefully reminiscent of the Introit Puer natus (A child is born for us) of the Mass of Christmas Day.

The setting sung at the 10:30 Mass is a ‘choral’ setting by American composer Richard Rice:  It is not a modal composition.

The Gradual, which replaces the Responsorial Pslam at the 10:30 Mass, sets a passage from Psalm 44 (Psalm 45 in the Masoretic numbering): This text in todays liturgical context, addresses Christ directly—remembering that Christ is the object of the entirety of scripture, of both the New and Old testaments—as being anointed with the oil of gladness: An allusion to His three-fold ministry as Priest, Prophet, and King: those which were signified by the gifts of the Magi.  This chant is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Wisdom; d’Arezzo calls it the ‘perfect’ mode, and Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) calls it simply ‘very happy’.  This very brief Gradual, is also very exuberant, and covers the entire range of the Mode: It begins on the lowest notes of the range, and very quickly ascends to the highest notes..  Because this chant is so short in comparison to other Graduals, both the Respond and the Verse will be sung in their full form, and with the Respond repeated after the Verse.

Turning to the Offertory, we have a text from Psalm 117 (118), which begins: Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord (Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini), which should be familiar from its use by the Church in the Sanctus.  This chant, like the Gradual, is in the Eight Mode, connected with the Gift of Wisdom: and which is called ‘perfect’ and ‘very happy’ by the Mediaeval and Renaissance theorists.  The melody of this chant is rather simple, and based on a archetypal melody of antiphon melodies in the Divine Office: it begins with a simple line that circles around the finalis of the mode; the second phrase ascends to the dominant (or reciting tone) at at ‘we have blessed you from the house of the Lord’, and returns to the finalis; the last phrase, like the first, again circles around the finalis.

The Communion Antiphon, taken from the Graduale Romanum, sets a passage from the Epistle to the Galatians.  This chant is set in the Second Mode (Hypodorian), which is connected with the Gift of Fear of the Lord, and which is often used for chants that speak of the Kingship or Sonship of Christ: such as the Introit for Midnight Mass of Christmas or the Introit of the Epiphany.  The melody of this chant is rather simple, and lies mainly in the mid-range of the mode.

At the 10:30 Mass, the Mass setting will be Mass VIII from the Kyriale Romanum.  This Mass, which has become known as the Missa de Angelis (Mass of the Angels), contains some of the latest chant in the repertory of Authentic Gregorian Chant—some musicologists consider some of its sections to be so late, as to not be authentic.  The Kyrie, which is in the Fifth Mode, dates from between the XIV and XVI Centuries—though it is very late, it dates from before the Council of Trent, and so there is a Trope for this chant which begins: Kyrie, Rex aeterno posse superno: “Lord, eternal King of lofty power.”  The Gloria, also in Mode V, is very late: XVI Century.  The Sanctus, which is in the VI Mode, is the earliest chant, dated to the XI or XII Century: it is, however, a Kontrafaktur (a process by which new words are fitted to existing music) of the Antiphon “O quam suavis est”.  The Agnus Dei, however, will not be in chant, but instead a setting by Healey Willan, from his Mass of Saint Teresa.  A translation of the Kyrie Trope is found below:

1. Lord, eternal King of lofty power, creator of all, have mercy. 2. Lord, the entire multitude of the globe praises thee, worthy and merciful, have mercy. 3. Lord, behold now the people here desiring gifts, have mercy. 4. Christ, mayest thou now keep us from our ills, founder of the world, have mercy. 5. Christ, having triumphed over pestilence, taking up these our sins, have mercy. 6. Christ, who by thy worthy blood savest us from the evil enemy, have mercy. 7. Lord, make the clergy sing a true hymn of the heart to thee, may they live for aye, borne by the spirit, a brilliant countenance, have mercy. 8. Lord, now, King of the wretched peoples, behold the prayers, O righteous flower of flowers and fount of good things, cleanse our guilt, have mercy. 9. Lord, take us up anew, lead the way, we beseech thee from the heart, by which we might have the strength to climb up and live the way, have mercy.

________________________________________________________________________

The Solemnity of the Baptism of the Lord

Theme: The Beauty of Death

Fr. Evaristus Abu

 “And when Jesus was baptized, he went up immediately from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and alighting on him; and lo, a voice from heaven, saying, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.”C:\Users\Kate\Desktop\baptism of the lord.jpg

Matthew 3:16-17.

     Just yesterday, we celebrated the Epiphany of Jesus Christ, today, we are officially bringing the whole Christmas Season to an End with the celebration of the Feast of the Baptism of Jesus Christ. Tomorrow, we shall return to Ordinary Time again.

     St. Maximus of Turin beautifully sums up the essence of our celebration today in these words: “At Christmas, Jesus was born a man; today he is reborn sacramentally. Then, he was born from the Virgin; today he is born in mystery. When he was born a man, his mother Mary held him close to her heart; when he is born in mystery, God the Father embraces him with his voice when he says: “This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased…” The mother caresses the tender baby on her lap; the Father serves his Son by his loving testimony. The mother holds the child for the Magi to adore; the Father reveals that his Son is to be worshiped by all the nations.”

     Our celebration of the baptism of Jesus reminds us of the meaning of baptism, the fact that we too were baptized and the demands of our baptism. What does it mean to be baptized? As Jesus said to Nicodemus, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born anew, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” John 3:3. To be baptized is to be born again and unless we die, we cannot be born again.

     Long before the era of the Gospel of prosperity, long before the era of “I receive it,” the most common question on the lips of Christian brothers and sisters was: “Are you born again?” Yes, that was the era when people could actually say, “I have seen the light” because their lives were truly transformed; sin no longer held sway in their daily routines.

     Unfortunately, things have changed today; too much water has passed under the bridge. No one sees the light anymore; it is now about “how I was poor before, now I am stingingly rich.” It is now about how this miracle or that miracle which I had been praying for over the years eventually happened. Testimony time today is now about how I sowed this seed or made this offering and how God “multiplied” it.

     Christianity today needs repentance. Yes, all of us who still call ourselves Christians today need to return to the basics; we need to thoroughly re-examine our mind- sets and those things we cherish most in life. We all need to be born again; our preachers must change their theologies and start telling us the hard truths we must hear rather than what we like to hear – that man’s greatest enemy is sin not poverty.

     Enough of “soul-winning” (which in essence is just “filling up the church with people”). Our churches are full already, now, we need to move to the next level; we need to start producing living saints.

     Enough of empires and mansions, enough of business centers in the name of the church, enough of schools, hospitals, banks, and so on and so on. Now is the time to tell ourselves the truth that it is not our money-making-enterprises that will sustain our churches but Faith. Christianity as we practice it today needs to die and become born again.

     Nonetheless, Christianity would not die unless we Christians die. (Christianity would not change unless I first change). This death is concretized in the baptismal promises to which we respond “I do.” I reject Satan. I reject everything that Satan has to offer. I refuse to listen to Satan’s promises. I reject the glamour of evil. I reject any sinful habit. I walk in the light.

     Let us pray: Lord Jesus, may my faith affect what I do even in secret.  Amen.

______________________________________________________________________________

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Vocations/Our SeminariansClergy who are sickClergy in PurgatoryDeacon BucciFr. Lunney/Deacon BetePope FrancisFr. Roux

RESPONSORIAL PSALM                                Is 12:2-3, 4bcd, 5-6  

R. (3)  You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.
God indeed is my savior;
    I am confident and unafraid.
My strength and my courage is the LORD,
    and he has been my savior.
With joy you will draw water
    at the fountain of salvation.
R. You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.
Give thanks to the LORD, acclaim his name;
    among the nations make known his deeds,
      proclaim how exalted is his name.
R. You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.
Sing praise to the LORD for his glorious achievement;
    let this be known throughout all the earth.
Shout with exultation, O city of Zion,
    for great in your midst
    is the Holy One of Israel!
R. You will draw water joyfully from the springs of salvation.

Eternal rest grant unto them o Lord,

 AND LET YOUR PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM!

Anna Misjek 1/10/1951

Julia Sokoloski 1/10/1953

Gloria A. Dulong 1/10/1998

Stanley P.Milewski, Sr. 1/10/2002

Maria Sahngshim Park Chung 1/10/2006

Anthony F. Muszynski, Sr. 1/10/2012

Alice P. Wojtkowski 1/10/2020

Aloysius Walichowski 1/11/1933

Jacob Sojka 1/11/1935

Valerie A. Usinski 1/11/1993

Mildred M. Traceski 1/11/2003

Edward F. Milewski 1/11/2010

Peter Napiorkowski 1/12/1934

Joseph Mlecko 1/12/1947

John Byk 1/12/1967

Stanley Krol 1/12/1996

Mary Muszynski 1/13/1953

Ludwik Pagoda 1/13/1965

Anna Putala 1/13/1974

George J. Smith, Sr. 1/13/1991

Leskidia Szehla 1/14/1929

Josephine Gozeski 1/14/1985

Ethel M. Siciak 1/14/1997

Wenceslaus Guzan 1/15/1934

Anna Zurko 1/15/1949

Michael Monkiewicz 1/15/1986

Diane F. Letourneau 1/15/1988

John Kurtyka 1/16/1951

Blanche E. Siwizki 1/16/2009

Bronislawa Banach 1/17/1928

Stanisława Okula 1/17/1930

John Sobolewski 1/17/199

Remember the Holy Souls in Your Prayers

Bulletin: January 3, 2021

+ Parish Schedule for the Week January 3, 2021+

+ JMJ +

Sunday,January 3: [The Epiphany of the Lord]:

    8:00 am + Stephen Saharceski – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

 10:30 am + Edward J. Sojka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

Monday, January 4: [St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious]:

   8:00 am + Kathryn Putala – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

Tuesday, January 5 [St. John Neumann][St. Gaudentius Radzion, Bl. Maria Marcellina Darowska]:   

  5:30 pm – Grace and Blessings for Betty Fritz – int. Family

Wednesday, January 6 [St. Andre Besette, Religious]:

  5:30 pm + Frank and Stella Konsevich – int. Joe and Anne Bastarache

Thursday, January 7:[St. Raymond of Penyafort, Priest]

  5:30 pm + Harold Walter Elliot – int. Grandson 

Friday, January 8:

  5:30 pm – Grace and Blessings for Michael Bailey – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

Saturday, January 9:

 8:00 am – Grace & Blessings for the Marian Sisters of Santa Rosa 

                  – int. Ron & Monica Scherman

 4:00 pm + Kathryn Putala – int. Daughters and Granddaughter 

 6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday,January 10: [The Baptism of the Lord]:

    8:00 am + Jewel Scherman – int. Ron & Monica Scherman

 10:30 am + David Voorhis – int. Jim & Cyndi Newcombe

THE FEAST OF THE THREE KINGS, on January 3RD is celebrated by the Polish people in a special way.  In church, chalk and incense are blessed and distributed to the faithful.  The incense is meant to remind us of the gifts the Three Kings gave to Jesus and the chalk is to be used in a special ceremony in each home.

    On returning to their homes with the blessed chalk and incense the families light the incense and the fragrant smoke is allowed to fill and sanctify the house, reminding everyone of the gifts of the Three Kings again and also of the spiritual gifts dispensed by the Church.  The blessed chalk is used to inscribe +K+M+B+ and the date over the inside of each door of the house.  The letters are the initials of the Three Kings: + Kaspar + Melchior + Balthasar +.  They are written over each entrance into the house, not only to commemorate the feast of the Magi but also to remind the inhabitants that they must treat all who come to their door as kings — as kings searching for Jesus (for are not all people searching for God?).  Hospitality and kindness must be shown to all just as one would show respect and kindness to the Three Kings searching for Jesus!

    The Polish proverb “Gość w dom, Bóg w dom” (A guest in the house is God in the house) reminds us that hospitality is a national trait of the Polish people.  The custom of writing the initials of the Magi over the entrance of a house is a vivid reminder of this beautiful and most Christian Polish characteristic.  Chalk and incense will be blessed at all the weekend Masses.

MONDAY, JANUARY 4TH is the Feast of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, an American saint from New York City who after her conversion to the Catholic Faith founded a religious teaching order in Emmetsburg, Maryland and grew in holiness and humility.  She will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 A.m.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 5th is the Feast of St. John Neumann who emigrated from Bohemia to the U.S., became the Archbishop of Philadelphia and was noted as a great educator and promoter of parochial schools.  His devotion to the Eucharist led him to establish Forty Hours Devotions in the United States.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m. and his relic will be venerated following this Mass.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6th is the Feast of Saint André Bessette known as the wonder-worker of Mount Royale.  Born in Canada, Blessed André lived and worked for a time in Western Massachusetts.  He became a brother of the Holy Cross.  His life work of charity and devotion to St. Joseph made him world famous.  His life was surrounded by miracles still in evidence at the shrine to St. Joseph which he built.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 P.m.

MILITES TEMPLI ARE ACTIVELY RECRUITING 

We invite you to prayerfully discern if God is calling you to serve at His altar.  Serving on the altar is a wonderful method of vocational discernment, it is also an apostolate unto itself. As such, this is an opportunity open to all men of faith. Adults and adolescent males alike are welcome in this ministry. It is a beautiful opportunity for fathers and sons to grow closer to God and each other by serving side by side during the Sacrifice of the Mass. However, men can also serve without sons and youths can serve without their fathers.

     So, if you are a man, teen, or boy who has made his first communion and would like to explore what it means to be a member of the Milites Templi, to serve at the altar, in direct service to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament contact Rob Demers. You can speak to him after Mass or email robertmdemers@gmail.com.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Carol Roux for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, January 3:   8:00  + Maurice Emond – int. Eichorn Family

Sunday, January 3: 10:30 – Grace & Blessings Mark & Mary LaCroix and Family 

                                               – int. Fritz Family

Monday, January 4: 8:00 + Helen Glazewski – int. Eichorn Family

tuesday, January 5: 5:30 – Grace, Health and Blessings for Sophie Fritz – int. Family

wednesday, January 6:  5:30 – Grace & Blessings Mark & Mary LaCroix and Family 

                                               – int. Fritz Family

thursday, January 7: 5:30 – Grace and Blessings Pat Jamrog – int. Betty Fritz

Friday, January 8: 10:30 +  Souls in Purgatory – int. Betty Fritz

Saturday, January 9: 8:00 – Grace and Blessings Pat Jamrog – int. Betty Fritz

Saturday, January 9: 4:00 – Birthday Blessings Carol Silva – int. Family

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

20-C+M+B-21

The Chalking of the Doors:

An Epiphany Tradition Explained

     If you’re a Catholic, you’ve probably seen it: a mysterious series of letters and numbers, looking for all the world like an equation, inscribed in chalk over a doorway at your parish, or at the home of a friend. Maybe you thought you could figure it out. Maybe you were too embarrassed to ask, “What the heck is that?”

     If you don’t know what the chalk is all about, don’t be ashamed. You’re certainly not alone.

     Epiphany (also known as Twelfth Night, Theophany, or Three Kings Day) marks the occasion of a time-honored Christian tradition of “chalking the doors.” The formula for the ritual — adapted for 2021 — is simple: take chalk of any color and write the following above the entrance of your home: 20 + C + M + B + 21.

     The letters have two meanings. First, they represent the initials of the Magi — Caspar, Malchior, and Balthazar — who came to visit Jesus in His first home. They also abbreviate the Latin phrase, Christus mansionem benedicat: “May Christ bless the house.” The “+” signs represent the cross, and the “20” at the beginning and the “21” at the end mark the year. Taken together, this inscription is performed as a request for Christ to bless those homes so marked and that He stay with those who dwell therein throughout the entire year.

     The chalking of the doors is a centuries-old practice throughout the world, though it appears to be somewhat less well-known in the United Sates. It is, however, an easy tradition to adopt, and a great practice whereby we dedicate our year to God from its very outset, asking His blessing on our homes and on all who live, work, or visit them there.

     The timing for the chalking of the doors varies somewhat in practice. In some places, it is done on New Year’s Day. More commonly, it is performed this Saturday — the traditional Feast of the Epiphany — the Twelfth Day of Christmas. Most often the chalking takes place after Epiphany Mass, and can be done at any church, home, or dwelling.  Traditionally the blessing is done by either a priest or the father of the family. This blessing can be performed simply by just writing the inscription and offering a short prayer, or more elaborately, including songs, prayers, processions, the burning of incense, and the sprinkling of holy water.

     After many Epiphany Masses, satchels of blessed chalk, incense, and containers of Epiphany water (holy water blessed with special blessings for Epiphany) are distributed. These can then be brought home and used to perform the ritual. Another common practice is to save a few grains of the Epiphany incense until Easter, so that it can be burned along with the Easter candle.

     Practicing traditions like the chalking of the doors helps us to live our Faith more concretely and serve as an outward sign of our dedication to Our Lord. Our homes are also the place where many of us will make the greatest strides in our spiritual growth, through observance of daily prayer, spiritual reading, and work offered as an oblation to God.

     The chalking of the doors of a home encourages Christians to dedicate their life at home to God and to others. Seeing the symbols over our doors can help to remind us, while passing in and out on our daily routines, that our homes and all those who dwell there belong to Christ. It also serves as a reminder of welcoming the Magi gave to Jesus. We should strive to be as welcoming to all who come to our homes to visit us!

     Below, we’ve provided some examples of how this ceremony can be performed.

     This ceremony of the blessing of the home and inscription of the initials of the three Magi above each door can be performed either by a priest or the father of the family. The following prayer is taken from the book, The Twelve Days of Christmas, by Elsa Chaney.

     The feast of manifestation, or Epiphany, is traditionally celebrated the 12th day after Christmas, January 6th.  In the dioceses of the United States this feast has been moved to the Sunday between January 2 and January 8.

Prayer:

On entering the home,

Leader(Priest, if present, or father of the family) : Peace be to this house.
All: And to all who dwell herein.

All: From the east came the Magi to Bethlehem to adore the Lord; and opening their treasures they offered precious gifts: gold for the great King, incense for the true God, and myrrh in symbol of His burial.

All Pray: The Magnificat. During the Magnificat, the room is sprinkled with holy water and incensed. After this is completed,

All: From the east came the Magi to Bethlehem to adore the Lord; and opening their treasures they offered precious gifts: gold for the great King, incense for the true God, and myrrh in symbol of His burial.

Leader: Our Father. . .
And lead us not into temptation

All: But deliver us from evil.
Leader: All they from Saba shall come
All: Bringing gold and frankincense.
Leader: O Lord, hear my prayer.
All: And let my cry come to You.

Leader: Let us pray. O God, who by the guidance of a star didst on this day manifest Thine only-begotten Son to the Gentiles, mercifully grant that we who know Thee by faith may also attain the vision of Thy glorious majesty. Through Christ our Lord.

All: Amen.

Leader: Be enlightened, be enlightened, O Jerusalem, for thy light is come, and the glory of the Lord is risen upon thee—Jesus Christ born of the Virgin Mary.

All: And the Gentiles shall walk in thy light and kings in the splendor of thy rising, and the glory of the Lord has risen upon thee.

Leader: Let us pray.
Bless, + O Lord God almighty, this home, that in it there may be health, purity, the strength of victory, humility, goodness and mercy, the fulfillment of Thy law, the thanksgiving to God the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. And may this blessing remain upon this home and upon all who dwell herein. Through Christ our Lord.

All: Amen.

     After the prayers of the blessing are recited, each room of the home is sprinkled with Epiphany water and incensed. The initials of the Magi are inscribed upon the doors with the blessed chalk. (The initials, C, M, B, can also be interpreted as the Latin phrase “Christus mansionem benedicat” which means “Christ bless this house”.)  Example: 20 + C + M + B + 21 

     Another possible prayer to say during your Chalking:

     May all who come to our home this year rejoice to find Christ living among us; and may we seek and serve, in everyone we meet, that same Jesus who is your incarnate Word, now and forever. Amen.

     God of heaven and earth, you revealed your only-begotten One to every nation by the guidance of a star. Bless this house and all who inhabit it. Fill us with the light of Christ, that our concern for others may reflect your love. We ask this through Christ our Saviour. Amen.

     Loving God, bless this household. May we be blessed with health, goodness of heart, gentleness, and abiding in your will. We ask this through Christ our Saviour. Amen.

However, you do it, it’s a rich tradition, a worthy invocation of God’s blessing, and a great conversation starter for your guests. For every person who asks about the inscription, there’s an opportunity to spread this authentically Catholic practice during the Epiphany.

Steve Skojec contributed to this article. Originally published on January 5, 2016.

_______________________________________________

VISIT: http://diospringfield.org/Ministries/child-youth-protection/ for resources for child abuse prevention and reporting.

ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA  01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010

THE EPIPHANY OF THE LORD

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS, AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00 & 10:30

Behold, the Lord, the Mighy One, has come; and kingship is in his grasp, and power and dominion.

(Cf. Malachi 3: 1; I Chronicles 29: 12; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel F. Weber, O.S.B.)

GRADUAL

10:30

All they from Saba shall come, bringing gold and incense, and shall shew forth the praises of the Lord. V/. Arise, and shine, O Jerusalem: for the glory of the Lord is risen upon thee.

(Isaiah 60: 6, 1; Graduale Romanum, The Plainchant Gradual, G.H. Palmer & Francis Burgess)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

The kings of Tharsis and the islands shall offer presents; the kings of the Arabians and of Saba shall bring gifts.  And all kings of the earth shall adore him, all nations shall serve him.

(Psalm 71:10, 11; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

COMMUNION

4:00

The brightness of God illumined the holy city Jerusalem, and the nations will walk by its light.

(Cf. Revelation 21: 23; Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

8:00 & 10:30

We have seen his star in the East, and have come with gifts to adore the Lord.

(Cf. Matthew 2: 2; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

ON THE SUNDAY after the Octave of Christmas (the Solemnity of Mary), in the Dioceses of the United States, is celebrated the Solemnity of the Eiphany of the Lord.  Since ancient times this great Feast celebrating the Manifestation (in Greek: έπιφάνεια epiphaneia, a revelation or manifestation) of Christ as Priest, Prophet, and King, has been celebrated, commemorating the Nations (represented by the Magi) coming ‘in the fullness of time’ to adore the God and King and pay Him homage.

    The ancientness and importance of this Feast is attested to by its occurrence in both the Western and Eastern Calendars, as well as the Traditional numbering of the Sundays between this Feast and Ash Wednesday as Sundays after Epiphany: it therefore, with Pentecost, forms one of the major hinges upon which the Ecclesiastical Year turns.  This Feast is transferred in the Dioceses of the United States (in the Ordinary Form, only) from January 6th (its official date in both the Western & Eastern Calendars) to the Sunday falling between January 2nd and 8th, which, sadly, lessens its status as one of the principal immovable feasts of the year; also, sadly, its octave was removed in the reform of the Missal in 1969, further lessening the importance of this feast—causing the latest breach in the Church between the West and East, where the Epiphany is still the major feast of the Advent, or Coming, of Christ; the emphasis on the celebration of the Nativity (Christmas), being primarily Western in origin and practice.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) for the Epiphany sets an ecclesiastical text, based on passages from the Prophecy of Malachi, and from I Chronicles, which speaks of the Kingship of Christ.  As the learned French Benedictine Abbot, Prosper Gueranger, says in his Liturgical Year: “The Church proclaims, in the opening chant of the Mass, the arrival of the great King, for whom the wole earth was in expectation, and at whose Birth the Magi are come to Jesualem, there to consult the prophecies.”  This chant is in the Second Mode (Hypodorian), which is connected with the Gift of the Fear of the Lord, and is used often in the Gregorian repertory for texts which speak of the majesy and kinship of God (cf. the Introit for the Midnight Mass of Christmas).  The melody of this chant stays primarily in the lower vocal range, and rises to its highest notes at the word ‘kingship’.  The optional psalm-verse, from Psalm 71 (which is used throughout this liturgy) also speak of the kingship of Christ.

The Gradual Responsory, sung in place of the Responsorial Psalm at the 10:30 Mass, sets a passage from the Prophet Isaias, about the ‘all those from Saba’ (representing the Gentiles), who will come to worship the Lord in Jerusalem: Thus is Christ not only the savior for the Jews, but for all mankind.  This chant is in the Fifth Mode (Lydian), but is not a close relative of the common melody, though the concluding jubilus of the versicle is the same: This chant seems to have been specially written for this great Feast.  Particularly noteworthy are the melismata on the words “arise” and “shine”, particularly the latter, where the melisma covers the entire range of the chant, and touches every note in the scale of the Fifth Mode.

Turning to the Offertory, we have a chant in the Fifth Mode (Lydian), which is considered by Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050) and other theorists to be the ‘happy’ mode; it is also connected with the Gift of Fortitude.  The text set in this chant is from Psalm 71, which speaks of the kings of various areas around Jerusalem coming to give gifts to the Messiah, and that ‘all the kings of the earth shall adore him’: This text is connected to the Lesson and Gospel of the Mass, which speak of the gifts of the Magi: like the Magi, at the Offertory of the Mass, we, too, offer our gifts, but not gold, frankinsense, and myrrh, but the Bread and Wine which will become the very Body of Christ, offered to the Father.

The Communion Antiphon at the Vigil Mass (4:00) sets a passage from the Book of Revelation.  Like the propers of many Vigils, this text is set in the future tense: This will happen (cf. Vigil of Christmas, Vigil of All Saints, etc.).  There text here, speaking of the light of God being revealed, proclaims that ‘the nations will walk by its light’.  This chant is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Wisdom—appropriate for the day on which we remember the Magi, the Wise Men, who cam from the Nations to adore the Lord; and which Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) calls simply ‘very happy’.

    At the Masses of the Day (8:00 & 10:30), the Communion Antiphon sets the words of the Magi: “We have seen his star…and have come to worship him”: the prophecy of the Vigil’s Commmunion Antipohon has been fulfilled.  This chant, like that of the Vigil, is in the Eighth Mode (cf. above); and while the melody is simple, it reaches a climax with a short melisma on the word ‘gifts’, which touches the highest notes of the mode before descending to the finalis or ‘home pitch’ of the Mode.

At the 10:30 Mass, the Mass Ordinary will again be Mass VIII from the Kyriale Romanum, the so-called “Missa de Angelis”, except for the Agnus Dei, which will be from Healey Willan’s Mass of St. Teresa.

The Epiphany of the Lord

On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother.  They prostrated themselves and did him homage.  Then they opened their treasures and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.    Matthew 2:11

     “Epiphany” means manifestation.  And the “Epiphany of the Lord” is Jesus’ manifestation not only to these three Magi from the East, but it’s also a symbolic but real manifestation of the Christ to the whole world.  These Magi, traveling from a foreign and non-Jewish nation, reveal that Jesus came for all people and all are called to adore Him.Cuba Confiscates Toys from Christians Looking to Celebrate Feast of Epiphany

     These Magi were “wise men” who studied the stars and were aware of the Jewish belief that a Messiah was coming.  They would have been versed in much of the wisdom of the day and would have been intrigued by the Jewish belief in the Messiah.

     God used what they were familiar with to call them to adore the Christ.  He used a star.  They understood the stars and when they saw this new and unique star over Bethlehem they realized that something special was happening.  So the first lesson we take from this for our own lives is that God will use what is familiar to us to call us to Himself.  Look for the “star” that God is using to call you.  It’s closer than you may think.

     A second thing to note is that the Magi fell prostrate before the Christ Child.  They laid their lives down before Him in complete surrender and adoration.  They set a perfect example for us.  If these astrologers from a foreign land could come and adore Christ in such a profound way, we must do the same.  Perhaps you could try literally lying down prostrate in prayer this day, in imitation of the Magi, or at least do so in your heart through prayer.  Adore Him with a complete surrender of your life.

     Lastly, the Magi bring gold, frankincense, and myrrh.  These three gifts, presented to our Lord, show that they acknowledged this Child as the Divine King who would die to save us from sin.  Gold is for a King, frankincense is a burnt offering to God, and myrrh is used for one who would die.  Thus, their adoration is grounded in the truths of who this Child is.  If we are to adore Christ properly, we must also honor Him in this threefold way.

     Reflect, today, upon these Magi and see them as a symbol of what you are called to do.  You are called from the foreign place of this world to seek out the Messiah.  What is God using to call you to Himself?  When you discover Him, do not hesitate to acknowledge the full truth of who He is, lying prostrate before Him in complete and humble submission.

Lord, I love You and adore You.  I lay my life before You and surrender all.  You are my Divine King and Savior.  My life is Yours. (Pray three times and then prostrate yourself before the Lord) Jesus, I trust in You   

http://www.catholic-daily-reflections.com

HOW DO I HAVE A MASS SAID FOR SOMEONE?    Having a Mass said for a loved one is a beautiful prayer and gift for their souls.  At Our Lady of Czestochowa, you have an opportunity to have a Mass said here at the church or sent to the Missions.  Both Mass types are published in the bulletin every week.  You may call in a Mass to the rectory at 413-863-4748—if no one is in the office you may leave a message.  You may also send in requests for Masses by mail or by dropping your requests in the collection basket. If you drop your Mass request or Mass payment in the collection basket, please make sure it is in a plain envelope, and the envelope states that it is for Masses and please include your contact info.  

When requesting a Mass, please indicate: 

1) WHO:  write out the name/names clearly specifying whether person is living or deceased 2) WHEN: specify if you want a specific date or time

3) WHERE: record the type of Mass you want (at OLC church or at African mission),

4)  FROM:  name of the person/persons requesting this Mass which appears in bulletin

5) OFFERING:  The basic stipend is $10 for a church Mass and $5 for a Mission Mass.  

We are currently booking Masses at Our Lady of Czestochowa with available dates beginning in April. Upcoming dates for Mission Masses are more readily available. We try to honor the dates and times as much as possible—if you have alternative dates or times, please indicate them also.  It is not recommended to use an extra church envelope or a Renovation Fund Card for this because it will cause confusion for our volunteers who process collection envelopes and you might not get your request!  And many, many thanks to Carol Gloski for her continued and devoted service to our parish in scheduling our thousands of Masses!

HELP AND SACRAMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SICK AND HOMEBOUND – If you know of anyone who is sick or homebound in need of the Sacraments or who needs assistance with errands, please notify the rectory at 413-863-4748.

HE WAITS FOR YOU – Please consider spending time with Our Lord in Eucharistic Adoration to make reparation to His Sacred Heart.  We have exposition of the Blessed Sacrament from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. Tuesday – Friday   and from 5:00 – 6:00 pm on Saturdays.  Sign-up sheets are in the front vestibule if you would like to commit to covering an hour.

THE TERESIANS – Please consider becoming a Teresian.  As we have said there is NO commitment.  We will notify everyone on the ministry list (via email) when someone is sick and in need of prayer or a visit OR dying and in need of prayer or a visit OR died and the funeral details.  It will be up to each individual/family to decide how they can minister.  No one is expected to respond to each need. If any parishioner knows of someone in need, please email Nancy Faller (nafaller@aol.com), so we can get the word out.

THERE WILL BE NO CATECHISM CLASSES because of the Christmas holiday, on the following dates:  Sunday, January 3rd.  Classes WILL RESUME  next Sunday, January 10th.  Because the Faith of our children is so important this and Easter Sunday are the only vacations our catechism classes ever have!  

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments!  Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Fr. O’MannionDeacon RatteFr. ReardonFr. O’ConnorFr. BermudezDeacon LearyFr. Lisowski

RESPONSORIAL PSALM                Ps 72:1-2, 7-8, 10-11, 12-13

R.(cf. 11)  Lord, every nation on earth will adore you.

O God, with your judgment endow the king,
and with your justice, the king’s son;
He shall govern your people with justice
and your afflicted ones with judgment.
R. Lord, every nation on earth will adore you.
Justice shall flower in his days,
and profound peace, till the moon be no more.
May he rule from sea to sea,
and from the River to the ends of the earth.
R. Lord, every nation on earth will adore you.
The kings of Tarshish and the Isles shall offer gifts;
the kings of Arabia and Seba shall bring tribute.
All kings shall pay him homage, all nations shall serve him.
R. Lord, every nation on earth will adore you.
For he shall rescue the poor when he cries out,
and the afflicted when he has no one to help him.
He shall have pity for the lowly and the poor;
the lives of the poor he shall save.
R. Lord, every nation on earth will adore you.

Eternal rest grant unto them o Lord

 AND LET YOUR PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM!

Charles J. Kabaniec 1/3/1986

Anthony J. Krejmas 1/3/1998

Joanna M. Sak 1/3/2016

John Provost, Jr. 1/3/2017

Frank Sak 1/4/1973

Edward J. Sojka 1/4/1996

Evelyn  Kalinowski 1/4/2007

Wojtiech Korcz 1/5/1940

Chester Waryas 1/5/1982

Stephen J. Janek 1/5/1992

Andrew Rastallis 1/5/1997

Grace M. Wikowski 1/5/2000

Edward T. Boliski 1/5/2012

Louis M. Kozloski 1/5/2012

Marya A. Bialecki 1/6/1990

June R. Murphy 1/6/2010

Carl Tela 1/7/1969

Mieczyslaw Brzozowy 1/7/1969 

Zigmund J. Kawecki 1/7/1980

Adam C. Markowski 1/7/1994

Mary Zak  1/7/1997

Helen Sak 1/7/2013

Eleonore Podlenski 1/8/1930

Mary Molongoski 1/8/1967

Anthony Malinowski 1/8/1976

Antoinette Godlesky 1/8/2003

Robert MacDonald 1/8/2014

Harold Banash 1/9/1934

Martin Pliszka 1/9/1945

Mary Kawecki 1/9/1958

John Apola 1/9/1976

Raymond A. Usinski 1/9/1989

Kathryn M. Putala 1/9/2019

Anna Misjek 1/10/1951

Julia Sokoloski 1/10/1953

Gloria A. Dulong 1/10/1998

Stanley P.Milewski, Sr. 1/10/2002

Maria Sahngshim Park Chung 1/10/2006

Anthony F. Muszynski, Sr. 1/10/2012

Alice P. Wojtkowski 1/10/2020

PLEASE REMEMBER THE HOLY SOULS IN YOUR PRAYERS!

Bulletin: December 27, 2020

+ Parish Schedule for the Week DECEMBER 27, 2020+

Sunday, December 27: [The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph]

    8:00 am + Brian J. LaDolce – int. Aunt Wanda Kozloski & Family

 10:30 am + John Sojka – int. Joe and Barbara Kuczinski

   2:00 pm – Guard of Honor Mini-Retreat and Holy Hour

Monday, December 28: [The Holy Innocents, Martyrs]:

    8:00 am + Blanche Sojka Golonka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

Tuesday, December 29 [Thomas à Becket, Martyr]:   

 5:30 pm – Catherine Anne Elliot – int. Grandson

Wednesday, December 30:

    5:30 pm + John Sojka – int. Patricia Sojka and Family

Thursday, December 31:[St. Sylvester]

    4:00 pm + Rose Gloski – int. Donna Cushing

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Friday, January 1 [Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God][First Friday]:

Holy Day of Obligation

   10:30 am + Anthony J. Sojka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

    7:30 pm – All Night Vigil of Adoration for Reparation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Saturday, January 2 [Sts. Basil the Great and Gregory the Naziazen, Bishops][First Saturday]:

   8:00 am + Richard Gamelin – int. Laurie, Tim and T.J.

   4:00 pm + Chester Gloski – int. Donna Cushing

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, January 3: [The Epiphany of the Lord]:

    8:00 am + Stephen Saharceski – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

 10:30 am + Edward J. Sojka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

+ KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIĘ ZA NAMI +

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27th is the Feast of The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph.  Special prayers will be offered at all the weekend Masses for the blessing of all our parish families.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 28th is the Feast of the Holy Innocents, celebrating the little children who were martyred by Herod in his desperate and greedy concern for his throne.  Special prayers will be offered during the 8:00 a.m. Mass for the holocaust of holy innocents martyred every year in our nation through abortion.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29th is the Feast of St. Thomas Becket who was martyred because he strenuously defended the freedom of religion and the rights of the Church. He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

NEW YEAR’S EVE is celebrated very differently in Poland.  It is a quiet time for reflection on the past year.  There are services in Church asking God for forgiveness of the sins of the past years and prayers for blessings on the coming year.  New Year’s Eve is called St. Sylvester’s Day in Poland.  (St. Sylvester was a great Pope in the early 300’s.)  In the cities there are parties after church services which are called Sylvester parties.Pope St

    The Sylvester Parties came about because of an old legend.  According to the story, Pope St. Sylvester I, imprisoned the dragon Leviathan in 317 A.D.  The belief grew that Leviathan would escape in the year 1000 A.D., set fire to the heavens and bring about the end of the world.

    Near the year 1000 a monk by the name of Gerbert became pope.  He was a scientist of sorts and spent his free time in his cell building strange machinery.  The people feared he was a sorcerer.  To make matters worse, Gerbert took the name of Sylvester II as Pope.  It seemed doubly certain then that as St. Sylvester I had imprisoned Leviathan, Pope Sylvester II would set him free.

    As December 31, 999 A.D. came closer, people lived in fear that they would suffer the horrible end of the world.  But as midnight came and went with not a sign of the dragon or the end of the world destruction, the release from tension was so great that the people rejoiced with parties ever since.  Hence the Sylvester parties of Poland and even our own New Year’s Eve parties.

    Meanwhile — what was Pope Sylvester II up to in his cell?  Was it sorcerer’s magic as the people feared?  Not at all!  Pope Sylvester II had been using his time to build a clock, which, perfected with the years, became the one we use today!  

    Pope St. Sylvester I will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.  This Mass will also be an opportunity to thank God for the blessings of the past year and to petition our Heavenly Father for help in the coming year.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 1st is the Octave Day of the Nativity of the Lord and the Solemnity of Mary, the Holy Mother of God.  Special prayers will be offered in thanksgiving for the past year and in supplication for blessings in the coming year.  We seek God’s blessings as did Mary.  Because of her Son, we can confidently call God, “Abba!”

HOLY HOUR AND MINI RETREAT – Join us TODAY before the Blessed Sacrament for the Holy Hour and Mini Retreat of the Guard of Honor of the Sacred Heart.  The Holy Hour and Mini Retreat takes place the last Sunday of every month in our church at 2:00 pm with our Pastor, Fr. Séan O’Mannion, National Director of the Guard of Honor – USA.    

FRIDAY, JANUARY 1ST IS THE FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH in honor of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus.  Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament for our All-Night Vigil of Reparation will begin at 7:30 pm, and continue all night until the 8:00 a.m. Mass.

THERE WILL BE NO CATECHISM CLASSES because of the Christmas holiday, on the following dates:  Sunday, December 27th and Sunday, January 3rd.  Classes WILL RESUME Sunday, January 10th.  Because the Faith of our children is so important this and Easter Sunday are the only vacations our catechism classes ever have!  

MILITES TEMPLI ARE ACTIVELY RECRUITING 

We invite you to prayerfully discern if God is calling you to serve at His altar.  Serving on the altar is a wonderful method of vocational discernment, it is also an apostolate unto itself. As such, this is an opportunity open to all men of faith. Adults and adolescent males alike are welcome in this ministry. It is a beautiful opportunity for fathers and sons to grow closer to God and each other by serving side by side during the Sacrifice of the Mass. However, men can also serve without sons and youths can serve without their fathers.

     So, if you are a man, teen, or boy who has made his first communion and would like to explore what it means to be a member of the Milites Templi, to serve at the altar, in direct service to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament contact Rob Demers. You can speak to him after Mass or email robertmdemers@gmail.com.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Shirley Webb for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

THE HOLY FAMILY: SUNDAY WITHIN THE OCTAVE OF THE NATIVITY

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS, AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00

The shepherds went with haste, and found Mary and Joseph, and the Infant lying in a manger.

(Luke 2:16; Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel F. Weber, O.S.B.)

10:30

God is in His holy habitation: He is God who setteth the solitary in families.  The God of Israel is He that giveth strenth: and power unto His people.

(Ps 67: 6-7, 36; Graduale Romanum, Introits and Graduals for the Church Year, Healey Willan)

GRADUAL

10:30

One thing have I desired of the Lord, which I will require: even that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life. V/. Blessed are they that dwell in thy house, O Lord: they will be always praising thee.

(Psalm 26:4; Graduale Romanum, The Plainchant Gradual, G.H. Palmer & Francis Burgess)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

In you, O Lord, I have placed my hope; I said, You are my God, my times are in your hands.

(Psalm 30: 15, 16; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

COMMUNION

4:00, 8:00 & 10:30

Our God has appeared on the earth, and lived among us.

(Baruch 3: 38; Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

THE SUNDAY within the Octave of the Nativity of Our Lord is the celebration of the Feast of the Holy Family. This Feast was established in 1893 by Ven. Pope Leo XIII, at the request of the Canadian Bishops, as an optional local Feast, celebrated on the Third Sunday after the Epiphany; it was made a universal Feast and moved to the Sunday in the Octave of the Epiphany in the Missale Romanum of 1920 by Pope Benedict XV, and was moved to its present location in the revision of the Calendar and Missal in 1969 (the Sunday after the Epiphany now being the Feast of the Baptism of Our Lord).  The purpose of this Feast is, of course, to honor the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, and shew them as a model of the Family: but also to strengthen the bonds of the Christian Family in the face of increasing secularization and attacks on the Christian Family: This was Leo XIII’s intention of establishing this Feast in 1893, over a hundred and twenty years ago.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) sung at the 8:00 Mass is taken from the Roman Missal: It is a passage from Luke’s Gospel, recounting the shepherds’ first encounter of the Holy Family in Bethlehem.  It is a very brief antiphon, set in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Wisdom, and which Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) describes a ‘very happy’.  Little need be said about the text, since its Christmas context is evident.  This chant is very simple, but has a lovely bit of word-painting when the melody descends to its lowest point at ‘and the Infant lying in a manger.’

At the 10:30 Mass, the Introit (Entrance Chant) will be an English setting of the text from the Roman Gradual (Graduale Romanum) for this Feast, a passage from Palm 67, in a setting by the Anglo-Canadian composer Healey Willan.  The text speaks of God dwelling in ‘His holy habitation’, and of the ‘God who setteth the solitary in families’.  The choice of this Chant for this Feast is seen in its connexion with other Masses in the Missal & Gradual: it is this Chant which the Church has used for centuries as the Introit for the Nuptial Mass.  This text, then, is chosen for today’s Feast because it speaks not only of God dwelling among us—appropriate of Christmastide—but of the joining together, the uniting of spouses, who as Christians, should always strive to ‘dwell in his house’.  While this setting is a modern composition, it retains the modality of the Gregorian setting, which is in the Fifth Mode (Lydian).  This mode is connected with the Gift of Fortitude—appropriate for a chant which speaks of ‘God who gives might and strength to his people’; and is considered by Espinosa and other theorists to be a ‘happy’ mode.

The Gradual, sung at the 10:30 Mass, sets a passage from Psalm 26.  The version of this Gradual sung here, is a neo-Gregorian melody from the 1908 Graduale Romanum, contained as an option in the Ordo Cantus Missæ of 1970—this is the Gradual that was appointed for this Feast in the 1920 Missale Romanum.  (As an aside, the 1908 Graduale is still the official chant book for the Church; the 1974 Graduale is simply a compendium of chants from the 1908 edition, re-arranged according to the Ordo Cantus Missæ of 1970 for the New Mass & Calendar; additionally, the editors of the 1974 Graduale only included ‘authentic’ chants, neo-Gregorian pieces like this Gradual were not included.)  This chant is in Mode V (Lydian), and is a variant of the common fifth mode Gradual melody found throughout the chant tradition.  The text, continues the theme of ‘blessed are those who dwell in his house’ begun in the Introit.

Turning to the Offertory chant, we have a setting of a passage from Psalm 30, which is a chant taken, like the second option for the Introit, from the Nuptial Mass, which again makes the connexion between the model of the Holy Family and the Christian Family.  This chant is in the Second Mode (Hypodorian).

The Communion Antiphon sung at all Masses this weekend, is taken from the Roman Missal.  It is a setting from a passage from the Prophet Baruch: “Our God has appeared on the earth, and lived among us”, which is, of course, appropriate for Christmastide.  This chant is modelled on those of a family of Antiphons of the Divine Office in a tone that has mixtures of the characteristics of both the Second (Hypodorian), and Fourth (Hypophrygian) Modes—it has the ‘harmonious’ and ‘tender’ qualities associated with Mode IV by Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050) and Adam von Fulda (1445-1505), but also the ‘serious’ qualities that Epinosa attaches to Mode II.  

At the 10:30 Mass, the Mass setting will be Mass VIII from the Kyriale Romanum.  This Mass, which has become known as the Missa de Angelis (Mass of the Angels), contains some of the latest chant in the repertory of Authentic Gregorian Chant—some musicologists consider some of its sections to be so late, as to not be authentic.  The Kyrie, which is in the Fifth Mode, dates from between the XIV and XVI Centuries—though it is very late, it dates from before the Council of Trent, and so there is a Trope for this chant which begins: Kyrie, Rex aeterno posse superno: “Lord, eternal King of lofty power.”  The Gloria, also in Mode V, is very late: XVI Century.  The Sanctus, which is in the VI Mode, is the earliest chant, dated to the XI or XII Century: it is, however, a Kontrafaktur (a process by which new words are fitted to existing music) of the Antiphon “O quam suavis est”.  The Agnus Dei, however, will not be in chant, but instead a setting by Healey Willan, from his Mass of Saint Teresa.  A translation of the Kyrie Trope is found below:

1. Lord, eternal King of lofty power, creator of all, have mercy. 2. Lord, the entire multitude of the globe praises thee, worthy and merciful, have mercy. 3. Lord, behold now the people here desiring gifts, have mercy. 4. Christ, mayest thou now keep us from our ills, founder of the world, have mercy. 5. Christ, having triumphed over pestilence, taking up these our sins, have mercy. 6. Christ, who by thy worthy blood savest us from the evil enemy, have mercy. 7. Lord, make the clergy sing a true hymn of the heart to thee, may they live for aye, borne by the spirit, a brilliant countenance, have mercy. 8. Lord, now, King of the wretched peoples, behold the prayers, O righteous flower of flowers and fount of good things, cleanse our guilt, have mercy. 9. Lord, take us up anew, lead the way, we beseech thee from the heart, by which we might have the strength to climb up and live the way, have mercy.

________________________________________________________________________

GMEF Annual Gala Cancelled Due to Death of Philip Bauer

The Gill-Montague Education Fund Annual Gala – “The Legend of Johnny Cash” has been cancelled. Joyce Phillips, Executive Producer, said “It is with extreme sadness that we learned that Philip Bauer passed away on November 24, 2020 of stage 4 colon cancer.

 Philip Bauer had been scheduled to perform on April 20 for the 2020 GMEF Annual Gala. It was postponed to 2021 due to the Pandemic. Philip Bauer was known world-wide as the number one tribute artist of Johnny Cash. He brought the sound and charisma of ‘The Man in Black” to life in his 90 minute stage show. W.S. Holland (Johnny Cash’s’ only drummer) recognized Philip as “the best I have ever seen.  “Because of the Pandemic, the GMEF was unable to raise money with the Gala which results in the support of student enrichment. Phillips said, the GMEF will continue to award 3 scholarships in June and their annual ‘roses for the seniors’ at graduation. 

 Anyone who purchased advanced tickets for the 2020 Gala, may wish to donate their ticket money towards student enrichment. Please contact us via our website: http://www.thegmef.org or email: info@thegmef.org.  We will send you a letter recognizing your 2020 tax deductible contribution.  Patrons may must return their tickets to The GMEF – TICKETS, PO Box 383, Turners Falls, MA 01376 for a full refund.  Our Annual Galas will return when it is safe for everyone to gather. Thank you for your support.

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD, and in memory of Stan and Cecile Sojka a donation has been made to our Parish Renovation Fund by Paul and Sandra Sojka. Bóg zapłać! 

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Fr. ReardonOur Retired PriestsDeacon CullitonClergy in PurgatoryFr. AksamitBishop ByrneFr. Campoli

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, December 27: 8:00 + James & Kathleen McCarthy – int. Doug and Pat Starbuck

Sunday, december 27: 10:30 + Edwin J. Putala – int Daughters and Granddaughter

Monday, december 28: 8:00 – Grace and Blessings Joseph Hughes – int. Claire Hughes

tuesday, December 29:  5:30 + Karen Fernandez – int. Clarie Hughes

wednesday, December 30:  5:30 + Birthday Blessings Carolyn Silva – int. Family 

thursday, December 31: 4:00 + Carl J. Keller – int. Claire Hughes

Friday, January 1: 10:30 + Patrick Keller – int. Claire Hughes

Saturday, January 2: 8:00 + Marie Finnegan – int. Claire Hughes

Saturday, January 2: 4:00 + Souls in Purgatory – The Shaughnessys

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!


Ps 105:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9                  RESPONSORIAL PSALM

R.  The Lord remembers his covenant forever.
Give thanks to the LORD, invoke his name;
make known among the nations his deeds.
Sing to him, sing his praise,
proclaim all his wondrous deeds.
R. The Lord remembers his covenant forever.
Glory in his holy name;
rejoice, O hearts that seek the LORD!
Look to the LORD in his strength;
constantly seek his face.
R. The Lord remembers his covenant forever.
You descendants of Abraham, his servants,
sons of Jacob, his chosen ones!
He, the LORD, is our God;
throughout the earth his judgments prevail.
R. The Lord remembers his covenant forever.
He remembers forever his covenant
which he made binding for a thousand generations
which he entered into with Abraham
and by his oath to Isaac.
R. The Lord remembers his covenant forever.
 

✠ Prayer for the Blessing of Families ✠

Priest–    Our help is in the Name of the Lord!

All–    Who made Heaven and Earth!

Priest–    The Lord be with you!

All–    And with your spirit!

Priest–    Bow your heads in prayer and ask for God’s blessing upon your families and upon the family we call our parish.

All–    Heavenly Father, bless our family and parish with Your grace. Let Your Spirit guide us in word and deed so that our light may shine before all and lead all who know us to give You praise!

Priest–    May our homes be filled with the spirit of love, with the obedience of faith, and the strength of hope!

All–    Make our lives happy in Your service, and bring us in Your love to Your Eternal Home!

Priest–    Father, All-Good, we praise Your Name; and ask this blessing through the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and good St. Joseph.

All–    Amen!

Eternal rest grant unto them o Lord

 AND LET YOUR PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM!

Carl Rogaleski 12/27/1969

Edwin J. Putala 12/27/1985

Stephanie Zamojski 12/27/2000

Rose Simondiski 12/27/2010

Caroline Brzozowy 12/27/2011

Bernard J. Fritz 12/27/2013

Stanley Bak 12/27/2016

Michael Putala 12/28/1947

Mary Kosewicz 12/28/1972

Joseph Zamojski 12/28/1978

Joseph J. Gozeski 12/28/1988

Jennie C. Rastallis 12/28/1996

Blanche Golonka 12/28/2000

Julia Czarnecki 12/29/1954

Ralph Kovalsick 12/29/1978

Walter J. Sak 12/29/1992

Arthur A. Paulin 12/29/2003

Helen G. Adzema 12/29/2008

Peter Koscinski 12/30/1922

Victoria Kliszka 12/30/1927

Casmier Kalinowski 12/30/1932

Michael Romejko 12/30/1948

Anna Bocon 12/30/1964

Edwin Marzalek 12/31/1953

Francis Waryas 12/31/1967

Beatrice Marziarz 12/31/1990

Mary “Molly” Pervere 12/31/2007

Eusebius Kelley 12/31/2013

Edward Baranowski 1/1/1936

Franciszek Zajec 1/1/1956

John Choleva 1/1/1972

Mary Sokolowski 1/1/1975

Josephine Milewski 1/1/1987

John A. Ciesunski 1/1/1995

Helen Muszynski 1/1/2016

Sophie Kozik 1/2/1933

Julia Escott 1/2/1984

Robert E. Talbot 1/2/2002

Charles J. Kabaniec 1/3/1986

Anthony J. Krejmas 1/3/1998

Joanna M. Sak 1/3/2016

John Provost, Jr. 1/3/2017

PLEASE REMEMBER TO PRAY FOR THE HOLY SOULS!

Bulletin: December 20, 2020

+ Parish Schedule for the Week DECEMBER 20, 2020+

Sunday, December 20: Fourth Sunday of Advent

    8:00 am + Stephen Golonka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

 10:30 am – Grace & Blessings for Megan Cali – int. Mom

Monday, december 21: [St. Peter Canisius, Priest and Doctor of the Church]:

    8:00 am + John Sojka – Sojka Families

Tuesday, December 22:   

 5:30 pm – Health & Blessings for Mary Ellen DeVito – int. Fritz Family

Wednesday, December 23 [St. John of Kanty, Priest]:

    5:30 pm + Lauren and Jeffrey Tela – int. Mom and Dad

Thursday, December 24 [Vigil of Christmas]

    4:00 pm – 1st Anniversary Helen Christian – int. Family, Sherrie & Jamie Yagodzinski 

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

The Church will be open for Midnight Mass at 11:00 pm

 12:00 am – Mass at Midnight – Benefactors of Our Lady of Czestochowa Parish

Friday, December 25 [Christmas – the nativity of the lord]

   10:30 am – For Our Parish and Parishioners

Saturday, December 26 [St. Stephen, Protomartyr]:

   8:00 am + 10th Anniversary- William J. Fleming – int. Driscoll Family

   4:00 pm + Una Lennon – int. MK Driscoll

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, December 27: [The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph]

    8:00 am + Brian J. LaDolce – int. Aunt Wanda Kozloski & Family

 10:30 am + John Sojka – int. Joe and Barbara Kuczinski

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24th – The Vigil Mass of Christmas Eve will begin at 4:00 p.m. with the Blessing of the Christmas trees, Manger and the Christmas hay to await the coming of the Christ Child.  Carols will be sung in English, Polish and Latin.  After the Mass, which will be in English, the congregation following an old Polish tradition is welcome to take a memento of the Blessed hay for the centerpiece on their Christmas Eve dinner table.https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/f9/af/80/f9af8035f415026c6eb9cf6c0d8a4ce8.jpg

THE MIDNIGHT MASS of the Shepherds will begin at exactly 12:00 MIDNIGHT.  It will, however, be introduced at 11:30 p.m. December 24th with a concert of Christmas music.  As the bells ring the midnight hour of Christmas morning, December 25th, the time of the birth of the Christ Child, a statue of the Infant Jesus will be blessed and carried in solemn procession around the church and then enshrined in the manger.  The Mass will follow in English.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25th – The Mass of Christmas Day will begin at 10:30 a.m. with the solemn proclamation of the birth of Christ and the solemn procession to the manger. 

THE SPANISH MASS FOR CHRISTMAS EVE will be celebrated on Thursday, December 24th, at 6:00 p.m.

PASTERKA is the name given to the Polish Midnight Mass.  Pasterka means Shepherds Mass and it is filled with all the joy and pageantry the Polish people can muster for this holy commemoration of the moment when God became man.  The crib is blessed, processions are held, the bells are rung and the sacred music is at its best.  Everything and everyone is directed to the Holy Christ Child – God Who became like us to save us!

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 23RD is the Feast of St. John Kanty.  John was a country lad who made good in the big city and the big university of Kraków, Poland. After brilliant studies he was ordained a priest and became a professor of theology. The inevitable opposition which saints encounter led to his being ousted by rivals and sent to be a parish priest at Olkusz. An extremely humble man, he did his best, but his best was not to the liking of his parishioners. Besides, he was afraid of the responsibilities of his position. But in the end he won his people’s hearts. After some time he returned to Kraków and taught Scripture for the remainder of his life.John was a serious man, and humble, but known to all the poor of Kraków for his kindness. His goods and his money were always at their disposal, and time and again they took advantage of him. He kept only the money and clothes absolutely needed to support himself. He will be remembered at the 5:30 Mass.

THE FEAST OF ST. STEPHEN (December 26th) – For the Polish people, the feast of St. Stephen is celebrated as a continuation of Christmas.  It is sometimes called “Drugie Święta” – the Second Holiday.

     St. Stephen is called the Protomartyr because he was the first Christian martyr — the first individual to die for his Faith.  He was one of the seven deacons that the Apostles ordained (Acts 6) to help them with the work of the early Church.  St. Stephen proved to be a gifted preacher and stressed that God was to be found everywhere, that the world and all His creation is sanctified by His loving presence.

     St. Stephen also preached strongly to those who failed to recognize the reality of God and who refused to acknowledge Jesus.  The Bible tells us that St. Stephen “was a man filled with grace and power, who worked great wonders and signs among the people.”  (Acts 6:8).  Because of his strong message of truth, St. Stephen was stoned to death by anti-Christian forces.  A convinced Christian to the end, St. Stephen prayed “Lord Jesus receive my spirit” as he was cruelly put to death and with his last breath he cried out in a loud voice “Lord, do not hold this sin against them!”  (Acts 7:59-60).  His death eloquently speaks of our duty as Catholics to love so completely that we can even forgive and love our enemies and those who would hurt us.

     There are a number of Polish customs associated with this feast day.  It is a day of fun and games.  People jokingly throw grain at each other as a reminder of the manner of death St. Stephen died and as a prayer for protection by the saint and for a good harvest.  On this day priests, deacons, nuns and altar boys are often greeted this way after Mass to remind them that they must live a life so completely dedicated to Jesus, so committed to God, that they should be willing and prepared to die as St. Stephen died.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30th is the Feast of The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph.  Special prayers will be offered at all the weekend Masses for the blessing of all our parish families.

Wesołych Świąt

 “‘Let us go over to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us.’  And they went with haste, and found Mary and Joseph, and the babe lying in a manger.” – Luke 2:15b-16

THE RITES OF THE WIGILIA* SUPPER even dictates the menu.  There is always an odd number of courses.  This is an old Polish tradition which says that an even number is conclusive – the end – but an odd number implies a continuation and a bounty.  Even the number of courses is a symbolic prayer in the Wigilia ceremony for “our daily bread”.

    The Wigilia feast is traditionally meatless – for it is the last day of Advent and the meatless fast must be observed.  But it is also the eve of great anticipation – the time when God became like us – when Heaven touched earth with great power.  So the fast is observed – but the vegetarian meal is festive and bountiful.  At least seven courses are included and often as many as eleven or fifteen courses are served!

    Another requirement for the Wigilia Supper is that the menu should represent the produce of all the farmer’s land and industry and all the sources of God’s goodness should be represented.  Most often there are delicately flavored mushrooms for the woods, fine wheat or millet for the field, sweet apples or plums for the orchard, tasty potatoes, cabbage and beets for the kitchen garden and herring and pike to symbolize the waters.  It is important to at least try or sample from every dish in gratitude to God for His kindness and bounty.  Not to do so would imply disrespect to God for His mercy!Wigilia

    A typical seven course menu for the rites of Wigilia might include:

    1.  Herring and marinated mushrooms with herbs.

    2.  Clear Barszcz and mushroom uszka

    3.  Broiled Pike with delicate horseradish sauce.

    4.  Cabbage soup with potatoes lightly flavored with onions.

    5.  Pierogi filled with spicy cabbage, light cheese, sweet fruit or berries.

    6.  Fruit compote.

    7.  Pastries, coffee, nuts and candies.

*Wigilia, the Christmas Eve Dinner, is sometimes also called Wilia. 

FOR THE GLORY OF GOD donations have been made for Christmas Flowers in memory of the following:  In memory of Raymond & Louise Kervian, Lawrence & Helen Pelletier, and David W. Phillips from Joyce & Tina / In memory of Leslie & Gertrude Phillips from Tina / In memory of Sr. Mary Rosalie, Charles and Cecelia Gloski, Mattie Stepanek and Sandy Miner from Joyce.  Bóg wam wielki zapłac!

THERE WILL BE NO CATECHISM CLASSES because of the Christmas holiday, on the following dates:  Sunday, December 27th and Sunday, January 3rd.  Classes WILL RESUME Sunday, January 10th.  Because the Faith of our children is so important this and Easter Sunday are the only vacations our catechism classes ever have!  

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, December 20: 8:00 + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Betty Fritz

Sunday, december 20: 10:30 – Health & Blessings Carol Conway – int. Holy Rosary Society

Monday, december 21: 8:00 + Chet Galvis – int. Family

tuesday, December 22:  5:30 + John & Anne Kobera – int. Family

wednesday, December 23:  5:30 + Joseph & Amelia Simkus – int. Family 

thursday, December 24: 4:00 – Special Intention for Michael William Ahearn & Robert James 

                                                        Ahearn – int. Betty Fritz

Friday, December 25: 10:30 + Living & Departed Members of the Fritz and Klepacki Families

                                    Int. Family

Saturday, December 26: 8:00 + Bernie Kobera – int. Family

Saturday, december 26: 4:00 – Health & Blessings Angela Patterson – int. The Shaughnessys

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Margaret Bates for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments!  Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

RORATE CÆLI: THE FOURTH SUNDAY OF ADVENT

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS, AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00 & 10:30

Drop down dew from above, you heavens, and let the clouds rain down the Just One; let the earth be opened and bring forth a Savior.

(Isaiah 45:8; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel F. Weber, O.S.B.)

GRADUAL

10:30

The Lord is nigh unto all them that call upon him: yea, all such as call upon him faithfully. V/. My mouth shall speak the praise of the Lord: and let all flesh give thanks unto his holy Name.

(Psalm 144: 18, 21; Graduale Romanum, The Plainchant Gradual, G.H. Palmer & Francis Burgess)

OFFERTORY:

8:00 & 10:30

Hail, Mary, full of grace; the Lord is with you; blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb.

(Luke 1:28, 42; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

COMMUNION:

4:00, 8:00 & 10:30

Behold, a Virgin shall conceive and bear a son; and his name will be called Emmanuel.

(Isaiah 7:14; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr Samuel Weber)

THE MASS for the Fourth Sunday of Advent is essentially Marian in tone, centering round the narration of the Annunciation to Mary from the Gospel of St. Luke, which continues in the Offertory and Communion.  This Sunday, coming as it does during the ultimae feriae (last days) of Advent, and the recitation of the Great ‘O’ Antiphons, pushes the Church toward the culmination of the Advent season toward the Nativity, as we will hear in the Prayer After Communion at this Mass, we pray that ‘as the feast day of our salvation draws ever nearer, so we may press forward all the more eagerly to the worthy celebration of the mystery of your Son’s Nativity.’  This Sunday is often called Rorate, after the Introit, or Canite tuba after the First Responsory of Matins: Blow ye the trumpet in Sion, call the nations, proclaim to the people, and say: Behold, God our Saviour shall come. V/. Declare it unto the ends of the earth: and in the isles afar off, and say: Behold, God our Saviour shall come.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) for this Sunday’s Mass, Rorate cæli, sets a passage from Isaiah wherein heaven and earth, representing the Virginal Fertility of the Blessed Mary, are implored to bring forth the Savior—our anticipation for the great feast of Christmas is so great that the Church cannot help but beg that our Savior come.  Further, the ‘celestial’ imagery of this chant can still be viewed through the eschatological lens of much of Advent: we are ever-more awaiting Christ who will come again ‘upon the clouds of heaven’.  This chant is in the First Mode (Dorian), which is connected with the Gift of the Holy Spirit, and is considered by the music theorist Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) to be ‘happy’ and ‘taming the passions’: We are to be joyful in our anticipation of the coming of Christ, both in the anniversary of the Nativity, but too at the consummation of all things—but it should be a serene joy, without worry of agitation.

The Gradual Responsory sets a passage from Psalm 144 (145 in the Mediæval rabbinical numbering).  The Lord is nigh unto all them that call upon him, while not reflecting on any particular reading, expresses the nearness of our Savior whom we eagerly await.  This chant is part of a large family of Graduals set in the Fifth Mode (Lydian); this mode is connected with the Gift of Fortitude, and is considered by the theorists Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050), Adam von Fulda (1445-1505), and Espinosa to be, simply, ‘happy’: an appropriate sentiment for this day.

In the Offertory, the Church repeats the Angelic Salutation heard in the Gospel: “Hail, Mary, full of grace!”, making this prayer of the Archangel Gabriel her own.  This chant is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is considered by Guido to be the ‘perfect’ mode; Espinosa calls it simply: ‘very happy’.  We should indeed be very happy because our Salvation is near at hand, since the most Excellent Virgin Mary, whose will, unstained by sin, was most perfectly united with the Divine Will, has consented to bear Him Who is God-with-us (cf. Communion Antiphon).

The Communion Antiphon sets the Prophecy of the Virgin Birth from Isaiah.  As with the Offertory, the text is so familiar that it hardly needs any explanation.  The chant is in the First Mode (Dorian), as is the Introit, and like the Introit, the optional verses are from Psalm 18: “The heavens declare the glory of God”.  In this chant, the Church recalls the centuries of Prophecy, and, like the Introit, anticipates with great joy the coming of Christ to save mankind from sin.

At the 10:30 Mass the Ordinary will again be Mass XVII from the Kyriale Romanum, which is suggested for the Sundays of Advent and Lent.  The first and more ancient of the two Kyrie settings will be used, known by its Trope (extra words), Kyrie salve.  This chant is in the 1st Mode (Dorian)  and dates from the X century, and revised between the XIV to XVII centuries.  This chant covers the entire range of the 1st Mode: remaining relatively low in the first Kyrie section, raising a little higher in the Christe, and reaching the highest notes in the last Kyrie sections, as if our petitions were becoming more urgent with each invocation.  The Sanctus is from the XI century and the Agnus from the XIII century; both chants are in the 5th Mode (Lydian).  A translation of the Kyrie Trope appears below:

Vs. 1. O Lord, hail, and always on this present crowd have mercy. 2. O Creator, give life; O Ruler of our homeland on high, have mercy. 3. Lord, born of Mary, Thine excellent Mother, have mercy. 4. Thou most like unto the Father, O Christ, King singular in power, have mercy. 5. Meekest King, have mercy on the multitude that sings praises to Thee. 6. O wondrous Christ, Whom all adore, have mercy. 

7. O Lord, in Persons three and Godhead one, have mercy. 8. O our most faithful Redeemer, now by death trampling death, have mercy. 9. O Lord, who tether us all to the Pole, renowned King, I beg Thee strenuously from devoted heart, have mercy.  (Translation by Sean Connelly, 2020.)

The Inn and the Stable

Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

   

Every artist has the feeling of being at home in his studio, every patriot at home in his own country, and every man at home in his house. One should therefore expect that the Creator would be at home in His own creation, and that God would be at home in the world He had made. And yet the most startling fact of human history is that when God came to earth, He was homeless at home. “He came unto His own, and His own received Him not.” (1 John 1:11) Ere yet the great portals of the flesh swung open, Mary and Joseph sought in vain for a place where might be born the One to whom the heavens and earth belonged. And so, when human history shall have written its last word in the scrolls of time, the saddest line of all will be “There was no room in the inn.” (2 Luke 2:7)

     There was room in the inn for those who bore on their breasts the screaming eagles of Rome; there was room for the daughters of the rich merchants of the East; there was room for all clothed in fine purple and soft garments; there was room for everyone — except the foster-father and the mother of the One who was to bring redemption to the world.

     And so, away from the inn and out to the stable they had to go, to a crude cave into which shepherds drove their flocks in storms. In that little haven, with manger beasts as companions, and at a central point between the three great civilizations of Memphis, Athens, and Rome, something happened — the only thing in the world that ever happened and mattered. That which happened was nothing less than Heaven being found on the earth as the cry of a God cried out in the cry of a Child.

     A startling paradox indeed: When God came to earth, there was no room in the inn, but there was room in the stable. What lesson is hidden behind the inn and the stable?

     What is an inn, but the gathering-place of public opinion, the focal point of the world’s moods, the residence of the worldly, the rallying place of the fashionable and those who count in the management of the world’s affairs? What is a stable, but the place of outcasts, the refuge of beasts, and the shelter of the valueless, and therefore the symbol of those who in the eyes of public opinion do not count, and hence may be ignored as of no great value or moment? Anyone in the world would have expected to have found Divinity in an inn, but no one would have expected to have found it in a stable. Divinity, therefore, is always where you least expect to find it.

     If, in those days, the stars of the heavens by some magic touch had folded themselves together as silver words and announced the birth of the Expected of the Nations, where would the world have gone in search of Him?

     The world would have searched for the Babe in some palace by the Tiber, or in some gilded house of Athens, or in some inn of a great city where gathered the rich, the mighty, and the powerful ones of earth. They would not have been the least surprised to have found the newborn King of kings stretched out on a cradle of gold and surrounded by kings and philosophers paying to Him their tribute and obeisance.

     But they would have been surprised to have discovered Him in a manger, laid on coarse straw and warmed by the breath of oxen, as if in atonement for the coldness of the hearts of men. No one would have expected that the One whose fingers could stop the turning of Arcturus would be smaller than the head of an ox; that He who could hurl the ball of fire into the heavens would one day be warmed by the breath of beasts; that He who could make a canopy of stars would be shielded from a stormy sky by the roof of a stable; or that He who made the earth as His future home would be homeless at home. No one would have expected to find Divinity in such a condition; but that is because Divinity is always where you least expect to find it.

Excerpt from God’s World and Our Place in It

Legend of the Poinsettia

The Legend of the Poinsettia

It once was the custom in Mexico for the villagers to leave a gift for the Baby Jesus in their church on Christmas Eve.  In one small village, a little boy who had no gift to bring prayed to God for a way to show his love for the Infant King.  God, in His mercy, looked down on the boy and answered his earnest prayer by causing a flower to bloom where he knelt – a flower so brilliant and fair.  The miraculous flower was formed like a star with leaves that were red and so bright, and the boy’s precious gift has come to be known as the “Flower of the Holy Night.

POLISH CHRISTMAS CAROLS are sung until the 2nd of February.  The Christmas season, for the Polish people, starts on Christmas Eve.  Advent is Advent — a time of preparation and anticipation.  Unlike many Western cultures, where Christmas carols and celebrations begin by December 1st, the Polish people spend that time in prayerful waiting.  The time after Christmas is the time for celebration.Koledy

    Unlike the Christmas songs of other countries the Polish carol (called a Kolęda) is not only a prayer but it is also a story — a kind of musical drama telling of the miraculous birth of Jesus.  These Kolędy are a musical expression of genius and profound religious conviction.  Many Polish carols date from the early 17th century and reflect, not only the folk culture of the day, but the royal and courtly life of the nobility.

    The word Kolęda is taken from the Latin word meaning the first day of the month and reflects the ancient custom of pre-Christian feasts in mid-winter.  With the coming of Christianity, the theme became the birth of Jesus.

    Many of the Kolędy are based on the majestic Polonez, a royal and stately dance from the courts of Polish kings.  One such Kolęda, “W Złobie Leży” was based on the Polonez played at the coronation of Wladyslaw IV (1632 – 1648).

    Adam Mickiewicz, in writing about the beauty of Polish Christmas carols, said:  “I doubt whether there is another country which can boast of such a collection of carols as Poland has.  It would not be easy to find any other nation’s poetry with feelings so pure, of such an extreme sweetness and delicacy.”

Eternal rest grant unto them o Lord

 AND LET YOUR PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM!

Magdelena Rudnicki 12/20/1931

Helena Karp 12/20/1955

Michael Saharceski 12/20/1967

Stephen A. Golonka 12/20/1978

John S. Zebrowski 12/20/1989

Katarzyna Choleva 12/21/1950

Kenneth A. Black 12/21/2011

Josepha Ponkowski 12/22/1926

Francis Ponkowski 12/22/1937

Frank Dlugosz 12/22/1959

Joseph W. Ranahan 12/22/2013

Fleurette Witalisz 12/22/2016

Walter Wysk 12/23/1972

Edward Waryas 12/23/1997

Josephine Sojka 12/24/1957

Mary Waraksa 12/24/1958

Viola Nadeau 12/24/1989

Edward F. Margola 12/24/1990

Walter P. Sokoloski 12/2419/92

Rolland Richotte 12/24/1993

Helen Deskavich 12/24/2012

Helen Molongoski 12/24/2012

Helen Christian 12/24/2019

Catherine Dobosz 12/25/1926

Casimier Seredejko 12/25/1945

Julia Sierakowski 12/25/1963

Joseph C. Kaminski 12/25/1982

Paul P. Deskavich 12/25/2016

Anthony Prohowicz 12/26/1935

Stanislaus Najda 12/26/1954

Adam Tuminski 12/26/1974

Stanley C. Semaski 12/26/1976

Eleonare Bakula 12/26/1981

Andrew J. Schab 12/26/1987

Anna E. Walton 12/26/2004

Scott L. Thompson 12/26/2

PLEASE REMEMBER TO PRAY FOR THE HOLY SOULS

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Clergy who are sickDeacon O’ConnorDeacon BeteBishop McDonnellVocations to the PriesthoodOur SeminariansFr. Roach

A CHRISTMAS CAROL  

Image result for nativity renaissance

The Christ-child lay on Mary’s lap,

His hair was like a light.

(O weary, weary were the world,

But here is all aright.)

The Christ-child lay on Mary’s breast

His hair was like a star.

(O stern and cunning are the kings,

But here the true hearts are.) 

The Christ-child lay on Mary’s heart,

His hair was like a fire.

(O weary, weary is the world,

But here the world’s desire.)

The Christ-child stood on Mary’s knee,

His hair was like a crown,

And all the flowers looked up at Him,

And all the stars looked down

                G.K. Chesterton

Merry Christmas — Wesolych Swiat — Feliz Navida

Sunday’s Responsorial Psalm

PS 89:2-3, 4-5, 27, 29

R. (2a) For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.
The promises of the LORD I will sing forever;
through all generations my mouth shall proclaim your faithfulness.
For you have said, “My kindness is established forever”;
in heaven you have confirmed your faithfulness.
R. For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.
“I have made a covenant with my chosen one,
I have sworn to David my servant:
Forever will I confirm your posterity
and establish your throne for all generations.”
R. For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.
“He shall say of me, ‘You are my father,
my God, the Rock, my savior.’
Forever I will maintain my kindness toward him,
and my covenant with him stands firm.”
R. For ever I will sing the goodness of the Lord.

✠ Prayer for the Lighting of the Fourth Advent Candle ✠

Priest    Blessed are you, Sovereign Lord, merciful and gentle: to you be praise and glory     for ever. Your light has shone in our darkened world through the child-bearing of     blessed Mary; grant that we who have seen your glory may daily be renewed in     your image and prepared like her for the coming of your Son, who is the Lord and Saviour of all.

ALL    Blessed be God for ever.

The last violet candle is lit with the rose candle

and the two previously lit violet candles.

Priest    Let us pray: O God, eternal majesty, whose ineffable Word the immaculate Virgin     received through the message of an Angel and so became the dwelling-place of     divinity, filled with the light of the Holy Spirit, grant, we pray, that by her example     we may in humility hold fast to your will.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your     Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. ALL:    Amen.

Bulletin: December 13, 2020

      

+ Parish Schedule for the Week DECEMBER 13, 2020+

Sunday, December 13: Third Sunday of Advent

    8:00 am + Antoninia Osmoła Sojka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

 10:30 am + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Debbie Herk

  4:00 pm – Advent Service with Carols

Monday, december 14: [St. John of the Cross, Priest and Doctor of the Church]:

    8:00 am + Anne Sojka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

Tuesday, December 15: 

   8:00 am – Grace, Health & Blessings for Christopher Wallace – int. Mom

Wednesday, December 16 [Ember Wednesday of Advent]:

    5:30 pm + 3rd Anniversary Lauren Tela – int. Mom and Dad

Thursday, December 17: 

    5:30 pm + Patricia Collins – int. Brendan Collins

Friday, December 18 [Ember Friday of Advent]:

    5:30 pm + Margaret Piasecki – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

Saturday, December 19 [Ember Saturday of Advent]:

   8:00 am – Grace & Blessings for Allison & Paul Edwards – int. Ron and Monica Scherman

   4:00 pm + Taylor Grogan – int. Laurie, Tim and T.J.

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, December 20: Fourth Sunday of Advent

    8:00 am + Stephen Golonka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

 10:30 am – Grace & Blessings for Megan Call – int. Mom

+KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIE ZA NAMI+

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14th is the Feast of St. John of the Cross who with St. Teresa of Avila founded the Discalced Carmelite Friars.  His writings soar to great spiritual heights and he is given the title “The Mystical Doctor”.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.C:\Users\Kate\Desktop\st john.jpg

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Carol Kostecki for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

HELP AND SACRAMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SICK AND HOMEBOUND – If you know of anyone who is sick or homebound in need of the Sacraments or who needs assistance with errands, please notify the rectory at 413-863-4748.  Volunteers are also needed for this ministry.  If you are available to assist people in need, please contact the Rectory.

:cath-greetings.jpg

CCD St. Nicholas Party: 

Saturday, December 19th 

SAVE THE DATE!!

The CCD St. Nicholas Party will be moved OUTSIDE on Saturday, December 19, following the Blessing of the Children at the 4 pm Mass.  

All CCD children are invited! This year, after our special prayers at Mass, we’ll gather on the Church lawn for the Lighting of the Christmas Tree!  We’ll enjoy some treats, sing Christmas carols, and look for a visit from St. Nicholas!  We’ll be careful to spread out safely–so glad to be celebrating together!  Look for a sign-up sheet in the vestibule.

A WORK BEE TO SET UP THE CHRISTMAS decorations in the church will take place on Sunday, December 20th after the 10:30 a.m. Mass.  Volunteers are needed and encouraged.

GAUDETE: THE THIRD SUNDAY OF ADVENT

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS, AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice.  Indeed the Lord is near.

(Philippians 4:4-5; Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

10:30

Rejoice in the Lord always, and again I say rejoice; Let your forbearance be known to all, for the Lord is near at hand; have no anxiety about anything, but in all things, by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God.

(Philippians 4:4-5; Graduale Romanum, The American Gradual, Bruce E. Ford)

GRADUAL

10:30

Shew thyself, O Lord, thou that sittest upon the Cherubim, stir up thy strength and come. V/. Hear, O thou Shepherd of Israel: thout that leadest Joseph like a sheep.

(Psalm 79:2, 3, 2; Graduale Romanum, The Plainchant Gradual, G.H. Palmer & Francis Burgess)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

O Lord, you have favored your land; you have restored the wellbeing of Jacob.  You have forgiven the iniquity of your people.

(Psalm 84:2; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

COMMUNION

4:00, 8:00 & 10:30

Say to the faint of heart: Be strong and do not fear.  Behold, our God will come, and he will save us.

(Cf. Isaiah 35:4; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

THE MASS for the Third Sunday of Advent marks the beginning of the turn of Advent from the Second Coming to the impending celebration of the Nativity.  From the beginning of the Introit we hear repeatedly the exortation Rejoice : we are to be glad because our redemption is near at hand.  Unlike the parallel Laetare Sunday of Lent, the rejoicing of this Sunday is as exuberant as the Church can allow without anticipating the fully joy of Christmas.  We are still awaiting our Lord’s coming, we are still in penitence, but we should rejoice because our Redemption is so close at hand.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) for this Mass is a setting of a passage from the Letter of St. Paul to the Philippians, which was the Epistle reading for the Third Sunday in the Extraordinary Form (this Epistle is used in Year C in the Ordinary Form).  This chant is in Mode I (Dorian), which is connected with the Holy Spirit, and is considered by Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) to be ‘happy and taming the passions’, which is appropriate, of course, for the text.

The Gradual (sung at the 10:30 Mass) sets a passage from Psalm 79, which is a prayer for the coming of the Lord, the Shepherd of Israel, and while not reflective of either the First or Second Readings, it reminds us of the cause of our rejoicing.  This chant is in the Seventh Mode (Mixolydian) which is connected with the Gift of Understanding and is called the ‘angelic’ mode by Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050)

The Offertory Responsory sets a passage from Psalm 84, which is one of the Psalms used throughout the Advent season.  The text set here as the Offertory, as Dom Prosper Guéranger, O.S.B. (1805-1875) says in his monumental work The Liturgical Year, reminds the faithful to “unite in the prayer of the Church, and beg that the captivity in which our sins hold us may be brought to an end, and that the divine Deliverer may come.”  Additonally, this chant speaks to the Lord who ‘favored the land’: which is appropriate for the Sunday of Ember Week of Advent: three days (Wendesday, Friday, and Saturday), which are traditionally set aside as days of fasting, absitnance from meat, and penance, at the beginning of each of the four seasons to thank God for the blessings of the earth, and to petition for the future fruits of the earth and for clement weather.  This chant is in the Fourth Mode (Hypophrygian), which is connected with the Gift of Knowledge, and is called ‘harmonious’ by Guido d’Arezzo.  Espinosa refers to this mode as ‘inciting delights and tempering fierceness’.

The Communion Antiphon is an exhortation from the Prophet Isaias to take courage because the Lord our God will come to save us from our sins.  Like the other chants and prayers of this Mass, the theme of rejoicing continues in this chant, particularly in the high range of the melody which immediately soars from the lowest notes to the highest.  This chant, like the Gradual, is in the Seventh Mode (Mixolydian)—cf. Gradual, above.

Gaudete: Let us rejoice, for he comes to save us.  As we prepare for the coming feasts (cf. Prayer after Communion, Third Sunday of Advent), we a called to rejoice for ‘indeed the Lord is near’ (cf. Introit).  During this week, on the Ember Days we will give thanks to God for ‘favoring the Land’ (cf. Offertory), and beginning on December 17th, when the Church at Vespers and Mass commences the Great ‘O’ Antiphons, we prepare most earnestly for the Nativity of our Lord—Let us rejoice, for the Lord is near.

At the 10:30 Mass, the Mass ordinary will be Mass XVII, which is suggested in the Kyriale Romanum for the Sundays of Advent and Lent.  The Kyrie will be the setting in the Sixth Mode (Hypolydian), which is traditionally reserved for the two ‘rejoicing’ Sundays: Gaudete and Laetare.  This chant is from the XIV century, and does not appear to have a trope.  This particular Kyrie chant is highly formulaic, with the same music repeated for ‘eleison’ in each invocation.  The Sanctus, from the XI century, and the Agnus, from the XIII century, both chants in the 5th Mode (Lydian), are the same as previous Sundays.

Infant Jesus of Prague

     Devotion to the Infant Jesus of Prague is devotion to the Child Jesus.  It is veneration of the Son of God, Who in the form of an infant chose a stable for a palace, a manger for a cradle, and shepherds for worshippers.  Our Savior grants special graces to all who venerate His sacred Infancy.Infant of Prague

     The image of the Child Jesus known as the “Infant Jesus of Prague” was in reality of Spanish origin.  In the 17th century, this beautiful statue was brought by a Spanish princess to Bohemia and presented to a Carmelite monastery.  For many years this statue has been enshrined on a side altar in the church of Our Lady of Victory in the city of Prague.  It is of wax, and is about nineteen inches high.  It is clothed in a royal mantle, and has a beautiful jeweled crown on its head.  Its right hand is raised in blessing; its left holds a globe signifying sovereignty.

     So many graces have been received by those who invoke the Divine Child before the original statue that it has been called “The Miraculous Infant Jesus of Prague.”  We read the following in an old book printed in Kempt:  “All who approach the miraculous statue and pray there with confidence receive assistance in danger, consolation in sorrows, aid in poverty, comfort in anxiety, light in spiritual darkness, streams of grace in dryness of soul, health in sickness, and hope in despair.”

     In thanksgiving for the numerous graces and cures received, the miraculous statue at Prague was solemnly crowned on the Sunday after Easter in 1665.  What is said of the original statue may be applied also to the images of the “Little King” which are venerated the world over.  From small beginnings, this devotion has grown to great proportions.  The Divine Child attracts an ever increasing number of clients who appeal to Him in every need.

Novena in Honor of the Infant Jesus of Prague

to be prayed from

December 17 through December 25*

O Miraculous Infant Jesus, prostrate before Your sacred image, we beseech You to cast a merciful look on our troubled hearts.  Let your tender heart so inclined to pity be softened by our prayers, and grant us that grace for which we ardently implore _____________________.  Take from us all affliction and despair, all trials and misfortunes with which we are laden.  For Your sacred infancy’s sake hear our prayers and send us consolation and aid, that we may praise You with the Father and the Holy Spirit, forever and ever.  Amen!

Please pray this novena for our Parish!!

THE EMBER DAYS

From the Catholic Encyclopedia

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LDtC4VTLVxA/Wb_vSMWUVOI/AAAAAAAAG-A/jUGzUErFGbYl-Evr30sY74CJOm2Sv7zagCLcBGAs/s1600/emberdaysprofile.jpgEmber days (corruption from Lat. Quatuor Tempora, four times) are the days at the beginning of the seasons ordered by the Church as days of fast and abstinence. They were definitely arranged and prescribed for the entire Church by Pope Gregory VII (1073-1085) for the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after 13 December (S. Lucia), after Ash Wednesday, after Whitsunday, and after 14 September (Exaltation of the Cross). The purpose of their introduction, besides the general one intended by all prayer and fasting, was to thank God for the gifts of nature, to teach men to make use of them in moderation, and to assist the needy. The immediate occasion was the practice of the heathens of Rome. The Romans were originally given to agriculture, and their native gods belonged to the same class. At the beginning of the time for seeding and harvesting religious ceremonies were performed to implore the help of their deities: in June for a bountiful harvest, in September for a rich vintage, and in December for the seeding; hence their feriae sementivae, feriae messis, and feri vindimiales. The Church, when converting heathen nations, has always tried to sanctify any practices which could be utilized for a good purpose. At first the Church in Rome had fasts in June, September, and December; the exact days were not fixed but were announced by the priests. The “Liber Pontificalis” ascribes to Pope Callistus (217-222) a law ordering the fast, but probably it is older. Leo the Great (440-461) considers it an Apostolic institution. When the fourth season was added cannot be ascertained, but Gelasius (492-496) speaks of all four. This pope also permitted the conferring of priesthood and deaconship on the Saturdays of ember week–these were formerly given only at Easter. Before Gelasius the ember days were known only in Rome, but after his time their observance spread. They were brought into England by St. Augustine; into Gaul and Germany by the Carlovingians. Spain adopted them with the Roman Liturgy in the eleventh century.  They were introduced by St. Charles Borromeo into Milan.

WHY ARE WE CELEBRATING THE EMBER DAYS?

We are celebrating the Ember Days this year in response to requests by several bishops, including Bishop Morlino of Madison, WI, and Bishop Zubik of Pittsburgh, PA, for their use as a time of reparation for the sins of the clergy, and to ask for God’s protection for the Church.

The Ember Days were traditionally days of fasting and abstinence, though this is no longer required.  The former regulations, which may be utilized for purposes of private devotion, are as follows:  On Ember Wednesday and Ember Saturday: Only one full meal was permitted, and two smaller meals not equal to the main meal could be taken; meat was only permitted at the main meal.  On Ember Friday: Only one full meal was permitted, and two smaller meals could be taken; being Friday, meat was not permitted at any meal.

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments!  Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, December 13: 8:00 + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Kate Driscoll

Sunday, december 13: 10:30 – Health & Blessings Wanda Kozloski – int. Holy Rosary Society

Monday, december 14: 8:00 + John Kobera – int. Family

tuesday, December 15:  5:30 – Marian Sak – int. Holy Rosary Society

wednesday, December 16:  5:30 + Laura R. Call – int. Deborah Herk 

thursday, December 17: 5:30 – Health & Blessings for Arlene Becklo – int Holy Rosary Society

Friday, December 18: 5:30 + Souls in Purgatory – int. Deobrah Herk

Saturday, December 19: 8:00 – Health & Blessings Sophie Fritz – int. Holy Rosary Society

Saturday, december 19: 4:00 + Souls in Purgatory – int. Deborah Herk

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Vocations/Pope FrancisFr.  RouxDeacon PlattenDeacon NolanFr. GoniMsgr. YargeauFr. DiMascola

VISIT http://diospringfield.org/Ministries/child-youth-protection/ 

for resources for child abuse prevention and reporting.

Eternal rest grant unto them o Lord

 AND LET YOUR PERPETUAL LIGHT SHINE UPON THEM!

John Nadolny 12/13/1938

Leo Piecuch 12/13/1942

Mary Grygo 12/13/1959

Antonina Hajduk 12/13/1961

Antonina Sojka 12/13/1974

Bernard Kurtyka 12/13/1974

Charlotte Kelley 12/13/1978

Anne Sojka 12/13/2005

Helen B. Krejmas 12/13/2012

Tadeusz Wojtasiewicz 12/14/1950

Anna Yarmak 12/14/1962

Julian Kulesa 12/14/1975

Raymond F. Kervian, Sr. 12/14/1992

V. Dorothy Fulton 12/14/2006

Jean Fielding 12/14/2018

John Kawecki 12/15/1950

Edwin C. Parry 12/15/1998

Sophie Piecuch 12/16/1928

Arlene J. Letourneau 12/16/1998

Julia Mlewski 12/17/1939

Joseph Dobosz 12/17/1952

Mary Pluta 12/17/1958

Henry A. Gaida 12/17/1973

Rose Dunican 12/17/1996

Lauren E. Tela 12/17/2017

John Yarmac 12/18/1962

Alexander Oleksiewicz 12/18/1967

Victoria Korcz 12/18/1973

Chester J. Kabaniec 12/18/2011

Joseph Oleksiewicz 12/19/1965

Anna Pieciuch 12/19/1967

Josephine Holewa 12/19/1973

Antonia Milewski 12/19/1975

Frank M. Dudek 12/19/1981

Henry P. Siciak 12/19/1995

Ronald J. Powers 12/19/2018

Magdelena Rudnicki 12/20/1931

Helena Karp 12/20/1955

Michael Saharceski 12/20/1967

Stephen A. Golonka 12/20/1978

John S. Zebrowski 12/20/1989

PLEASE REMEMBER TO PRAY FOR THE HOLY SOULS!

✠ Prayer for the Lighting of the Third Advent Candle ✠

Priest    Blessed are you, sovereign Lord, just and true: to you be praise and glory for ever.     Your prophet John the Baptist was witness to the truth as a burning and shining     light. May we your servants rejoice in his light, and so be led to witness to him who     is the Lord of our coming kingdom, Jesus our Saviour and King of the ages.

ALL    Blessed be God for ever.

The rose candle is lit with the two previously lit violet candles.

Priest    Let us pray: Incline a merciful ear to our cry, we pray, O Lord, and, casting light on     the darkness of our hearts, visit us with the grace of your Son. Who lives and reigns     with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

ALL    Amen.

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies

Bulletin: Decmber 6, 2020

+ Parish Schedule for the Week DECEMBER 6, 2020+

Sunday, DECEMBER 6: Second Sunday of Advent

   8:00 am – Grace & Blessings for Lindsay and Michael Bibeau – int. Ron & Monica Scherman

 10:30 am – Health and Blessings for Bishops, Priests & Deacons in our Diocese 

Monday, december 7: [St. Ambrose, Bishop & Doctor of the Church]:

    8:00 am – Grace & Blessings for Megan Call – int. Mom

    5:30 pm   Vigil Mass for Holy Day: — int.  Our Parish and Parishioners 

Tuesday, December 8: [The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary] 

   8:00 am – Grace, Health & Blessings for Betty Fritz – int. Mom

   5:30 pm + Lauren and Jeffrey Tela – int. Mom & Dad

 Wednesday, December 9 [Saint Juan Diego]:

    5:30 pm + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Debbie Herk

Thursday, December 10: 

    5:30 pm + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Melissa Wright

Friday, December 11 [Saint Damasus I, Pope]

    5:30 pm + Bonnie Demers –int. Donald and Stan Parda

   7:00 pm – Mass in Spanish in Honor of Our Lady of Guadalupe – int. Parish & Parishioners

Saturday, December 12 [Our Lady of Guadalupe]:

   8:00 am + Father Bruno and All Living and Deceased Members of the St. Joseph Chapter of the  

                    Discalced Carmelites Secular

   4:00 pm + Raymond F. Kervian 28th Anniversary – int. Joyce and Tina Phillips

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, December 13: Third Sunday of Advent

   8:00 am  + Antoninia Osmola Sojka – int. John and Ted Sojka Families

 10:30 am + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Debbie Herk

  4:00 pm – Advent Service with Carols

MONDAY, DECEMBER 7th is the Feast of St. Ambrose, a model Pastor, untiring preacher, and defender of orthodoxy.  He wrote many Liturgical hymns and is listed as one of the four Doctors of the Latin Church.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8th is the Feast of the Immaculate Conception in which we celebrate the purity of Mary as the Mother of God.  The Masses for the Holy Day will be Monday, December 7th at 5:30 p.m. and Tuesday, December 8th at 8:00 a.m.  Mary, under the title of Immaculate Conception, is also the patroness of our country and special prayers will be offered at the Masses for our nation. Venite, Missa Est!: Post #140 | Blessed mother mary, Blessed mother,  Catholic

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9th is the Feast of Saint Juan Diego the indigenous Mexican Catholic convert whose encounter with the Virgin Mary began the Church’s devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 pm

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th is the Feast of Pope St. Damasus I.  He is best known with St. Jerome for gathering the scattered books of the Bible into the Bible we now have.  In other words, it is thanks to St. Damasus and the work of St. Jerome that the world has been able to preserve the Bible.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

THE WEEKLY ST. JUDE NOVENA takes place on Wednesday, December 9th at the 5:30 p.m. Mass.  All are invited to take advantage of this opportunity to enlist the help of the saint of impossible cases.

A SPANISH VIGIL MASS FOR THE FEAST OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE WILL BE OFFERED ON FRIDAY DECEMBER 11TH AT 7:00 P.M.   This devotion recalls the four apparitions of Mary to a Native American, Saint Juan Diego.  The most startling aspect of the vision is the permanent miracle which is an image of Mary miraculously and inexplicably imprinted on the cloak of St. Juan Diego that remains to this day at the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico.  A reproduction of this miraculous icon is enshrined in the front vestibule of our church.  She will also be remembered at the 8:00 am Mass on the feast day which is celebrated on Saturday, December 12th

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Terry Dempsey for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

HELP AND SACRAMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SICK AND HOMEBOUND – If you know of anyone who is sick or homebound in need of the Sacraments or who needs assistance with errands, please notify the rectory at 413-863-4748.  Volunteers are also needed for this ministry.  If you are available to assist people in need, please contact the Rectory.

GROCERIES AND PANTRY HELPERS ARE ALWAYS NEEDED  Pancake mixes & syrups, peanut butter, jellies, cereals, and canned raviolis are favorites!  Any non-perishables are very helpful! Please consider volunteering in our Food Pantry to help sort and bag donated goods.  Please call the Rectory if you would like to volunteer.  We are looking for someone to help on Monday mornings for about an hour.  Thank You!  Bóg wam wielki zapłć!

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments!  Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.
:cath-greetings.jpg

CCD St. Nicholas Party: 

Saturday, December 19th 

SAVE THE DATE!!

The CCD St. Nicholas Party will be moved OUTSIDE on Saturday, December 19, following the Blessing of the Children at the 4 pm Mass.  

All CCD children are invited! This year, after our special prayers at Mass, we’ll gather on the Church lawn for the Lighting of the Christmas Tree!  We’ll enjoy some treats, sing Christmas carols, and look for a visit from St. Nicholas!  We’ll be careful to spread out safely–so glad to be celebrating together!  Look for a sign-up sheet in the vestibule.

POPULUS SION: THE SECOND SUNDAY OF ADVENT

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS, AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00 & 10:30

O people of Sion, behold, the Lord will come to save the nations, and the Lord will make the glory of his voice heard in the joy of your heart.

(Isaiah 30:19, 30; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

GRADUAL

10:30

Out of Syon hath God appeared in perfect beauty. V/. Gather my saints together unto me: those that have made a covenant with me with sacrifice.

(Psalm 49:2, 3, 5; Graduale Romanum, The Plainchant Gradual, G.H. Palmer & Francis Burgess)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

Will you not, O God, give us life; and shall not your people rejoice in you?  Show us, O Lord, your mercy, and grant us your salvation.

(Psalm 84:7-8; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

COMMUNION

4:00, 8:00 & 10:30

Jerusalem, arise and stand upon the heights, and behold the joy which comes to you from God.

(Baruch: 5:5; 4:36; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber)

THE MASS for the Second Sunday of Advent speaks of three different advents, or comings, of Christ: The First Reading, from the Prophet Isaias, speaks principally about the Natvity, and the coming of the Messiah generally; the Second Reading, from II Peter, speaks of the Second Coming; the reading from the Gospel of Mark about St. John the Baptist, speaks of the coming of Christ in His public ministry after His Baptism by St. John in the Jordan River.  This is a very dynamic Mass formulary, and while we are continuing to see and hear texts pertaining to the Last Judgement and the Second Coming, the Church is beginning to transition into a preparation for the Nativity and the Epiphany, which was once, as it still is in the Eastern Church, the principal feast of the ‘Advent’ of Christ, being His manifestation (from the Greek: έπιφάνεια epiphaneia, a revelation or manifestation) as Priest, Prophet, and King.

The Introit (Entrance Chant) is a setting of a passage from the Prophet Isaias which speaks both to the Jews awaiting the coming of the Messiah, but also to the Church which is awaiting both the anniversary of that first coming and, with greater longing, for the Second Coming at the End of Time.    This chant is in the Seventh Mode (Mixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Understanding, and is considered to be ‘angelic’ by the Mediaeval music theorist Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050); the Renaissance theorist Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) says that this Mode ‘unites pleasure and sadness’—sentiments most fitting to a people (the Church) who are looking with great longing for the fulfilment of all things, when the Lord will “come to save the nations” and “make the glory of his voice heard”.  This chant, while following the general melodic shape of Gregorian Chants as a arch, contains principally rising melodic phrases: a melodic depiction of those who are waiting for the Christ lifting their heads (cf. Lk. 21:28).

The Gradual, sung at the 10:30 Mass, is a setting of a passage from Psalm 49.  This chant forms a kind of musical bridge between the First and Second Readings: While its words can be seen as a meditation upon the passage from Isaias, its text within this Sunday’s liturgy is seen primarily through an eschatologial lens, one which harkens back to the beginning of November and the Solemnity of All Saints.  This chant is part of the large family of Mode V (Lydian) Gradual Chants, and is sung in an adaptation from The Plainchant Gradual, the text is as found in the Missal of the Anglican Ordinariates, established by Pope Benedict XVI in 2009 in his motu proprio Anglicanorum coetibus.

The Offertory Responsory for this Sunday sets a text from Psalm 84—the same Psalm that was used for the Communion on the First Sunday of Advent.  The passage used in this chant is comprised of two sections: A rhetorical question, followed by a prayer for mercy.  The music is in the Third Mode (Phrygian) which is connected with the Gift of Piety, and is considered by d’Arezzo to be the ‘mystic’ mode: appropriate for the commencement of the Liturgy of the Eucharist, as the sacred altar is prepared for the Immolation of the Victim.

The Communion Antiphon sets a passage from the book of the Prophet Baruch, which is again both looking toward the Nativity, but also toward the Parousia.  The text is similar to the passage from the First Reading, where the Prophet bids Jersualem (referring both the Jews of old and, in the Christian tradition, the Church—the New Jerusalem) to ‘arise’ and ‘behold’ the coming of the Messias, but also to the Second Reading where St. Peter bids us be ready for the Coming of the Kingdom.  This chant is set in the Second Mode (Hypodorian), which is connected with the Fear of the Lord, and is also used in the Gregorian tradition for texts which speak of the majesty of God and the Kingship of Christ.  The music is reflective of the text, beginning with a series of rising figures on the text: “Jerusalem arise, and stand upon the heights”.  When the text speaks of the “joy that comes to [us]” the music descends: showing the descent of Christ from heaven.

At the 10:30 Mass the Ordinary will again be Mass XVII from the Kyriale Romanum, which is suggested for the Sundays of Advent and Lent.  The first and more ancient of the two Kyrie settings will be used, known by its Trope (extra words), Kyrie salve.  This chant is in the 1st Mode (Dorian) and dates from the X century, and revised between the XIV to XVII centuries.  This chant covers the entire range of the 1st Mode: remaining relatively low in the first Kyrie section, raising a little higher in the Christe, and reaching the highest notes in the last Kyrie sections, as if our petitions were becoming more urgent with each invocation.  The Sanctus is from the XI century and the Agnus from the XIII century; both chants are in the 5th Mode (Lydian).  A translation of the Kyrie Trope appears below:

Vs. 1. O Lord, hail, and always on this present crowd have mercy. 2. O Creator, give life; O Ruler of our homeland on high, have mercy. 3. Lord, born of Mary, Thine excellent Mother, have mercy. 4. Thou most like unto the Father, O Christ, King singular in power, have mercy. 5. Meekest King, have mercy on the multitude that sings praises to Thee. 6. O wondrous Christ, Whom all adore, have mercy.

7. O Lord, in Persons three and Godhead one, have mercy. 8. O our most faithful Redeemer, now by death trampling death, have mercy. 9. O Lord, who tether us all to the Pole, renowned King, I beg Thee strenuously from devoted heart, have mercy.  (Translation by Sean Connelly, 2020.)

Mary, Conceived Without Sin,

You DID Know

By Anita Moore

     Raise your hand if you have ever heard the song “Mary, Did You Know?” within the precincts of a Catholic church.  I can’t see you, but I know you’re out there.  My hand is also up.  Somehow, because this song mentions the Mother of God, it has become a Christmas tradition in some parishes.  But although the gentleman who wrote “Mary, Did You Know?” clearly means well, this song is both musically inappropriate for Mass and subversive of the Catholic faith.

     From a musical standpoint, “Mary, Did You Know?” is basically a pop song, and although the Mass has been saturated with such for a couple of generations now, the fact remains that it is not sacred music suited for use at Mass.  But even more objectionable, from the Catholic point of view, is the lyrical content.  

     “Mary, Did You Know?” is based on some abysmally erroneous assumptions.  To begin with, it is supposed that Mary does not know that her holy Infant is the Son of God.  Some saints — for instance, St. Alphonsus Liguori, bishop and Doctor of the Church — are of the opinion that even before the Annunciation, Mary had a profound understanding of prophecies and Scriptures concerning the promised Messiah.  But even without such an understanding, it would have taken a high degree of inattention on Mary’s part to the message of Gabriel and the inspired greeting of her cousin Elizabeth for her to labor under ignorance of her Son’s divinity.  It is further supposed that Mary does not know that her Son will suffer for the redemption of mankind.  This would have required her to utterly gloss over the prophecies of holy Simeon concerning her Son as God’s salvation, a sign of contradiction, and concerning the sword of sorrow that would pierce her own soul.  The idea of the Mother of God not being in possession of the most critical facts about her divine Son, particularly in view of explicit revelations received by her, is absurd on its face.

     But there is an even more blatant error in the lyrics of “Mary, Did You Know?” that ought to induce in every Catholic a sharp intake of breath.  It is a defined dogma of the Catholic faith that the Mother of God was conceived without original sin.  On December 8, 1854, in the Apostolic Constitution Ineffabilis Deus, Pope Pius IX defined the dogma of the Immaculate Conception:

     We declare, pronounce, and define that the doctrine which holds that the most Blessed Virgin Mary, in the first instance of her conception, by a singular grace and privilege granted by Almighty God, in view of the merits of Jesus Christ, the Savior of the human race, was preserved free from all stain of original sin, is a doctrine revealed by God and therefore to be believed firmly and constantly by all the faithful. 

     Contrast this with the following lyrics from “Mary, Did You Know?”:

     Mary did you know that your baby boy will one day walk on water?

     Mary did you know that your baby boy will save our sons and daughters?

     Did you know that your baby boy has come to make you new?

     This child that you’ve delivered, will soon deliver you.

     Whereas Catholics accept as revealed truth that Mary was free from sin from the instant of her conception by virtue of the anticipated merits of Jesus’ suffering and death on the Cross, the foregoing is based on the assumption that Mary was under the sway of sin at the time she gave birth to the Christ Child, and that she would remain so until His Sacrifice of redemption.  In short, it is a flat denial of the Immaculate Conception.  As such — and for this reason alone — it should never be sung in a Catholic church, or find any place in any Catholic liturgy, and Catholics should not embrace it.  Perhaps a fitting way to honor today’s feast of the Immaculate Conception — in addition to fulfilling our obligation to attend Mass — would be to defend the dogma which this feast celebrates by doing what we can to see that “Mary, Did You Know?” remains unheard in our parishes during this and every Christmas season.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, December 6: 8:00 + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Maureen Filiault

Sunday, december 6: 10:30 + Meleana Gelinas – int. Debbie Herk

Monday, december 7: 8:00 + Deceased Members of the Noga Family – int. Irene Klepadlo

tuesday, December 8:  8:00 + Lynn Ellen Kobera – int. Family

tuesday, December 8:  5:30 + Deceased Members of the Klepadlo Family – int. Irene Klepadlo

wednesday, December 9:  5:30 + Henry Hachey – int. Deborah Herk 

thursday, December 10: 5:30 + Bernie Kobera – int. Mary Kobera

Friday, December 11: 5:30 + Health & Blessings Irene Klepadlo – int. Holy Rosary Society

Saturday, December 12: 8:00 + Leah Hachey – int. Deborah Herk

Saturday, december 12: 4:00 + Al Lawton – int. Deborah Herk

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Fr. O’ConnorFr. LisowskiDeacon LearyDeacon DeCarloDeacon BucciDeacon RabbittFr. Bermudez

Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,

And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them

Ralph Fronkus 12/6/1934

Frances Zamojski 12/6/1956

Florence M. Kortz 12/6/2000

Randall G. Senn 12/6/2003

Edalia “Dolly” Marszalek 12/6/2006

Stanislava Zurko 12/7/1935

Piotr Noga 12/7/1952

Anthony Nowak 12/7/1958

Sophie S. Duda 12/7/1988

Mary H. Zewinski 12/7/1995

Edmund R. Dunican 12/7/2002

Charles  Gibowicz, Jr. 12/7/2007

Chester J. Osowski 12/8/1988

Gaetana I. Eichorn 12/8/1989

Jennie F. Monkiewicz 12/8/1991

Sigmund Molongoski 12/8/2002

Edwin Nowak 12/9/1925

Apolonia Zorzuski 12/9/1945

Josefa Kuczewski 12/9/1968

Caroln Organ 12/9/2019

Fran J. Puhala 12/10/1965

NellieSeremeth 12/10/1973

Fran J. Bocon 12/11/1995

CarlS. Hoynoski 12/11/1996

Kenneh Rosewarne 12/11/1998

Dr. Edmund Olchowski 12/11/2000

Genevieve E. Krol 12/11/2007

Casimier Kurtyka 12/12/1935

Joseph Kurkulonis 12/12/1949

Anna Yarmac 12/12/1962

Edward Krysiak 12/12/1988

Mary Woznakewicz 12/12/2001

John Nadolny 12/13/1938

Leo Piecuch 12/13/1942

Mary Grygo 12/13/1959

Antonina Hajduk 12/13/1961

Antonina Sojka 12/13/1974

Bernard Kurtyka 12/13/1974

Charlotte Kelley 12/13/1978

Anne Sojka 12/13/2005

Helen B. Krejmas 12/1

Helen Christian 12/24/2019

PLEASE REMEMBER TO PRAY FOR THE HOLY SOULS!

✠ Prayer for the Lighting of the Second Advent Candle ✠

Priest    Blessed are you, sovereign Lord, just and true: to you be praise and glory for ever.     Of old you spoke by the mouth of your prophets, but in our days you speak through     your Son, whom you have appointed the heir of all     things. Grant us, your     people,     to walk in his light, that we may be found ready and watching when he comes in     glory and judgment; for you are our light and our salvation.

ALL    Blessed be God for ever.

The First and Second violet candles are lit.

Priest    Let us pray: Stir up our hearts, O Lord, to make ready the paths of your Only     Begotten Son, that through his coming, we may be found worthy to serve you with     minds made pure.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns     with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

ALL    Amen.

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies

Bulletin: November 22, 2020

+JMJ+

+ Parish Schedule for the Week November 22, 2020+

Sunday, November 22: Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

    8:00 am + Paul Angus – int. Anne Jarvis

 10:30 am + Jackie Horne – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

 11:15 am – Christ the King Devotions

Monday, November 23:[St. Clement I/St. Columban/Bl. Miguel Agustin Pro]:

    8:00 am + Jane Wolfe – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

Tuesday, November 24: [St. Andrew Dũng-Lac, Priest and Companions, Martyrs]:

   5:30 pm + Catherine Baranowski – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

Wednesday, November 25: [Saint Catherine of Alexandria, Virgin and Martyr]:

   5:30 pm + Francis Kurtyka – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

Thursday, November 26: [Thanksgiving Day]

    8:00 a.m. + For Our Parish

Friday, November 27 [Feast of the Miraculous Medal]:

    5:30 pm – Grace & Blessings for Betty Fritz – 2020 First Holy Communion Class

Saturday, November 28: 

   8:00 am + Anna & Andre LaPalme – int. Brenda

   4:00 pm + 37th Anniversary Charles Gloski – int. Family

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, November 29: First Sunday of Advent

   8:00 am – Successful Induction of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court – int. Robert Brzozowy

 10:30 am + John Sr. and Catherine Baranowski – int. John Baranowski Jr.

   2:00 pm – Guard of Honor Mini-Retreat

+ KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIĘ ZA NAMI +

TODAY, NOVEMBER 22ND  is the Feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe – the feast of a King whose kingdom is not of this world.  Our task is to live as citizens of this heavenly kingdom.  May we, through this Eucharist, gain strength to proclaim in our lives that Christ is truly our King, and that His kingdom is truly our kingdom.  Our response is life lived in the service of justice and peace.

IN ACCORDANCE with the requirements of the Diocesan Synodal Statues (#209:1), following the Sunday 10:30 a.m. Mass of Christ the King we will have Exposition, the Litany of the Sacred Heart, the Act of Consecration and Benediction.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23rd is the Feast of Pope St. Clement I and St. Columban as well as Blessed Miguel Agustin Pro.  St. Clement, Pope of the early Church, was martyred in the year 100 under Trajan.  St. Columban, an Irish Monk and Missionary to northeast France, lived a life of penance and prayer founding numerous Monasteries.  Blessed Miguel Pro was noted for his open and sympathetic nature as well as his firm piety and faith.  Amidst Mexican religious persecution he was executed on November 23, 1927 at the age of 36.  The firing squad executed him and his last words were “Long live Christ the King.”  The above Saints will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25th is the Feast of St. Catherine of Alexandria.  Catherine was a learned woman of the early fourth century who, according to legend, following her conversion at the age of eighteen, preached the Gospel throughout Alexandria in Egypt.  While imprisoned by the emperor Maximus, she converted both the empress and the leader of the armed forces, and for this she was martyred.  Legend has it that upon her death, after a wheel of torture (known as “Catherine’s wheel) broke; her body was supposedly carried by angels to Mt. Sinai.  Venerated in the East since the ninth century, she is a patron saint of philosophers, preachers, and young unmarried women.  She will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

THE MASS FOR THANKSGIVING DAY, Thursday, November 26th, will be at 8:00 a.m. rather than at 5:30 p.m.  Please note that there will be no Holy Hour on Thanksgiving Day. 

Viva Cristo Rey – Long Live Christ the King!

Fr. Dwight Longenecker

One of the difficulties about preaching is there is too much to say and too little time to say it. This is especially true of the celebrations that only come around once a year. So for Christ the King we should remember Blessed Miguel Pro and “Viva Cristo Rey!” and the need for majestic Catholic worship and the response

of thanks and willingness to serve

.

What didn’t get said was the reason for the institution of the Feast of Christ the King in the first place. The feast was established by Pope Pius XI in 1925 as an antidote to secularism and the rising tide of the sort of democratic political forces that not only proclaimed equal rights for all men, but did so not on the true basis that all are created in the image of God, but on the principles of secular humanism–that men’s equality to one another is the primary virtue on which a new kind of egalitarian society would be created.

The Catholic Church is not against the idea of equality and the essential human dignity of each person, but Pius XI saw the result of communism and the Bolshevik revolution and the rise of different atheistic revolutionary forces which were not simply a call for social equality, but were a secular, atheistic and humanist attempt to make man and the utopian societies they wished to create the summit and goal of history.

In the face of this Pius established the Feast of Christ the King to say boldly, “No matter what great utopian dreams of a great society you have, Christ is the King. No matter what democratic mob rule you bring about, Christ is the King! No matter what atheistic regimes you establish which persecute the church Christ is the King! No matter what humanistic philosophies you teach, what materialistic creeds you endorse, what atheism you teach our children, Christ is the King! No matter what kingdom of death you establish with your prison camps, your hospitals of euthanasia, your experiments on the disabled, your abortion mills and your decadent culture Christ is the King!

This is where the Catholic faith is always at her strongest–not when she conforms to the world, but when she stands up to criticize the world, and this is the sure and certain, slow death of Christianity–when it conforms to the world and simply and silently goes along with the flow.

It is no coincidence that the feast of Blessed Miguel Pro happens at the same time of the year as the splendid feast of Christ the King for Blessed Miguel, like all the saints, in his own way and through his own vocation, illustrates one aspect of the church’s mission and therefore incarnates the whole of the church’s mission. Serving valiantly as a priest in the midst of the cruel Mexican persecution he dies just two years after the feast of Christ the King was established. With his cry of “Viva Cristo Rey!” he makes the bold statement with his life what Pius XI meant to have on the lips of all Catholics.

Jesus Christ the King says, “My Kingdom is not of this world” so whenever we see a regime gearing up to create a utopian society a culture where all is controlled to bring about some great new dream or some brave new world, let Catholics shudder for the Catholic Church and Christ the King will most surely be regarded as that worldly regime’s obvious and most virulent enemy. When you see these things take place be prepared for the persecution will most certainly be around the corner. When faced with a monstrous regime and religious persecution every Catholic must be prepared to cry with Blessed Miguel Pro – “¡Viva Cristo Rey!”

__________________________________________________________________________________

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Virginia Avery for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

HELP AND SACRAMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SICK AND HOMEBOUND – If you know of anyone who is sick or homebound in need of the Sacraments or who needs assistance with errands, please notify the rectory at 413-863-4748.

GROCERIES ARE ALWAYS NEEDED for those who often come to the Rectory.  Currently, we are low on pasta sauce for an overabundance of pasta we’ve received.  Pancake mixes & syrups, peanut butter, jellies, cereals, and canned raviolis are favorites!  Any non-perishables are very helpful! Bóg wam wielki zapłć!

“The rich man who gives to the poor does not bestow alms but pays a debt.”
– St Ambrose of Milan

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments!  Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

THE TERESIANS – Please consider becoming a Teresian.  As we have said there is NO commitment.  We will notify everyone on the ministry list (via email) when someone is sick and in need of prayer or a visit OR dying and in need of prayer or a visit OR died and the funeral details.  It will be up to each individual/family to decide how they can minister.  No one is expected to respond to each need. If any parishioner knows of someone in need, please email Nancy Faller (nafaller@aol.com), so we can get the word out.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, November 22: 8:00 –   Grace, Health & Blessings for Robert Brzozowy int. Betty Fritz

Sunday, November 22: 10:30 + Emily Garmalo – int. Family

Monday, November 23: 8:00 + Emily Garmalo – int. Family

tuesday, November 24 5:30 + Emily Garmalo – int. Family

wednesday, November 25:  5:30 + Emily Garmalo – int. Family

thursday, November 26: 5:30 – Grace, Health, Blessings for Robert Brzozowy – int. Betty Fritz 

Friday, November 27: 5:30 + Emily Garmalo – int. Family

Saturday, November 28: 8:00 + Emily Garmalo – int. Family

Saturday, November 28: 4:00 + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. The Shaughnessys

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać!

GUARD OF HONOR MINI-RETREAT– Next Sunday 11/29 please join us for the monthly Guard of Honor mini-retreat.  We will begin at 2:00 p.m. with the Rosary and a talk about the Guard of Honor devotion followed by a holy hour that includes guided meditations ending with Benediction at 4:00 p.m. 

ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA  01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010.

THE SOLEMNITY OF CHRIST THE KING: “DIGNUS EST AGNUS”

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00 & 10:30

How worthy is the Lamb who was slain, to receive power and divinity, and wisdom and strength and honor.  To him belong glory and power for ever and ever.

(Rev. 5:12, 1:6; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

GRADUAL

10:30

He shall rule from sea to sea, and from the River to the ends of the earth. V: All kings shall pay him homage, all nations shall serve him.

(Psalm 71: 8, 11; Graduale Romanum, Comple English Propers for the High Mass, Rev. Paul Arbogast)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

Ask of me, and I will give you the nations for an inheritance and the ends of the earth for your possession.

(Psalm 2: 8; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

COMMUNION

4:00, 8:00 & 10:30

The Lord sits as King for ever.  The Lord will bless his people with peace.

(Psalm 28:10-11; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

THE FEAST of Christ the King was instituted by Pope Pius XI in 1925: His Holiness’s intention in establishing this feast, in the wake of the First World War, was to remind people of the Kingship of Christ over all peoples, lands, and nations.  When this Feast was instituted it was placed on the last Sunday of October; during the revision of the Calendar after the close of the Second Vatican Council, it was decided to transfer this feast to the Last Sunday of the Liturgical Year.  This new positioning makes this last Solemnity of the Year, a Feast in honour of Him who is Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the End of all things, the hinge on which turns the old year to the new.  (It should be noted that liturgical scholars, while welcoming the new Feast in 1925, debated its position on the Calendar, and this debate is still taking place today: There are reasonable and laudable arguments both for the placement at the end of October, and at the end of the Liturgical Year.

The Introit for this Mass is, fittingly, taken from the book of Revelation: “Worthy is the Lamb”.  It is set in the Third Mode (Phrygian), which is connected with the Gift of Piety, and is considered by Guida d’Arezzo (995-1050) to be the ‘mystical’ mode: Appropriate for a liturgical celebration which is a mystical contemplation for something which is yet to happen.

The Gradual, sung only at the 10:30 Mass in place of the Responsorial Psalm, sets a portion of Psalm 71—a Psalm which is used frequently during the liturgy of the Solemnity of the Epiphany.  This is a simple setting of the text, set in the Seventh Mode (Mixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Understanding.

Turning the the Offertory, we have a setting of a text from Psalm 2.  This Psalm is used throughout the Christmas season, particularly at the Midnight Mass.  The setting here is in the Fourth Mode (Hypophrygian), which is connected with the Gift of Knowledge.  D’Arezzo says that this mode is “harmonious”, and Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) says that this mode ‘incites delights’.  This chant stays primarily in the lower part of the range of the Mode, which can be seen as a kind of descent of Christ to the earth to claim his Kingdom.

The Communion chant sets a passage from Pslam 28.  The text is an interesting mixture of that which is: ‘The Lord sits as King’; and that which will be: “The Lord will bless”: We know that Christ is King now, and we look forward in faith for His second Coming.  This chant is in the Sixth Mode (Hypolydian), which is considered to be ‘devout’ by d’Arezzo, and ‘pious’ by Adam von Fulda (1445-1505), and is connected with the Gift of Counsel.  This chant sits primarily in the upper part of the range, which seems to suggest on Christ’s coming down, but man’s going up: the resurrection of the dead, of which St. Paul speaks in the Second Reading.

This Mass then, as it always has, focusses not only on the earthly Kingship of Christ here and now, but also on the Second Coming of Christ, as the ‘King of tremendous majesty’ (cf. the Sequence of the Requiem Mass: Dies Irae) who will judge both the living and the dead.  It forms, then, not only a fitting closure to the themes of All-hallowtide and the last Sundays of the year, but also a fitting opening to the Season of Advent, which is first and foremost about the Second Coming.  Looking at the liturgical history of the Western Church, where once Advent had seven weeks, we see that things are seeming to come full circle: The 32nd and 33rd Sundays and the Solemnity of Christ the King, whose themes and readings dovetail with those of the First and Second weeks of Advent, function as if they were the first three weeks of a seven-week Advent cycle.

At the 10:30 Mass, the Mass setting will be Mass VIII from the Kyriale Romanum.  This Mass, which has become known as the Missa de Angelis (Mass of the Angels), contains some of the latest chant in the repertory of Authentic Gregorian Chant—some musicologists consider some of its sections to be so late, as to not be authentic.  The Kyrie, which is in the Fifth Mode, dates from between the XIV and XVI Centuries—though it is very late, it dates from before the Council of Trent, and so there is a Trope for this chant which begins: Kyrie, Rex aeterno posse superno: “Lord, eternal King of lofty power.”  The Gloria, also in Mode V, is very late: XVI Century.  The Sanctus, which is in the VI Mode, is the earliest chant, dated to the XI or XII Century: it is, however, a Kontrafaktur (a process by which new words are fitted to existing music) of the Antiphon “O quam suavis est”.  The Agnus Dei (Sixth Mode) is also a later chant, dating from the XV Century, and  is first found in a manuscript from Rouen, where it replaces an older Agnus Dei for this Mass which was a rather infelicitous Kontrafaktur of the “O quam suavis” melody of the Sanctus; this former melody is still found in the chant books of the Cistercian Rite 

_______________________________________________________________________

2020 ANNUAL CATHOLIC APPEAL.  Thank you to all those who have made a gift or pledge to “Our Faith, Our Future”.  Your gift will make a difference in someone’s life and will share God’s mercy message in a tangible way.  As of November 1st we have received gifts from 82 donors who have pledged/contributed $8,715.00 which is 87% of the way toward our goal of $10,000! If you have not made a donation, it’s not too late!!  Prayerfully consider a gift. More envelopes are on their way and will be found in the front vestibule.   No contribution, no act of charity is ever too small or insignificant.  Thank you.

HE WAITS FOR YOU – Please consider spending time with Our Lord in Eucharistic Adoration to make reparation to His Sacred Heart.  We have exposition of the Blessed Sacrament from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. Tuesday – Friday   and from 5:00 – 6:00 pm on Saturdays.  Sign-up sheets are in the front vestibule if you would like to commit to covering an hour.

THE CHARITABLE AND PRO-LIFE PROJECTS OF EACPF (EAST AFRICA CHARITABLE PROJECT FUND):  Next weekend there will be donation box to help support the work of EACPF in its mission to deliver Pro-Life Values through programs geared toward educating the people of Uganda through Radio Programs and Community Outreach.  They seek to fight the growing number of abortions and HIV/Aids transmission by promoting the Catholic Church’s teachings on chastity and abstinence.  100% of the donations will go to support these important programs.  Please be generous in helping our brothers and sisters in Uganda who benefit greatly from this information and education.

Please Support Our

PARISH RAFFLE FUNDRAISER

Nine baskets will be raffled off on Dec 6, 2020.  This raffle is taking the place of our annual Christmas Bazaar, which cannot be held due to COVID-19.  Please consider what you would usually spend at the Bazaar and use that money to purchase chances for these beautiful baskets.  Pictures of the baskets are on display in the vestibule.  You may choose the basket(s) you want for your chances.   1 chance for $10 or 

3 Chances for $20

WINE BASKET

2 Bottles of Kendall Jackson Chardonnay         1 Bottle of Korbel California Champagne                       2 Champagne flutes     1 Box of Organic Mediterranean Crackers with Sea Salt        1 Wedge of Asiago Cheese with Rosemary and Olive Oil      1 Wedge of Aged Gouda cheese

CARVED BOWL BASKET

1   Wooden Salad Bowl       2 Salad Servers      2 Cookie mixes       1 Box Bisquick        

1 Salad Dressing      3 Homemade Jams    2 Maple Syrups      1 Honey    1 Cake Mix    

1 Polish cup w/tea

SCRATCH TICKET BASKET

$100 worth of scratch tickets     $50 cash

POLISH BASKET

1 Large Jar of Imported Belveder Polish Beets     1 Large Jar of Belveder Polish Salad  Mixings     1 Jar Lowicz Rasberry Jam   1 Jar Lowicz Forest Fruits jam     1 Jar Mushrooms and Stems          1 Large Jar Imported Polan Tomato Rice Soup     1 Large Jar Imported Polan Mushroom Soup      2 Cans Sardines      1 Box of Loyd Herbal Honey Tea     2 Packages of Krakus Biscuit Cookies        1 Candle of the Blessed Virgin Mary

IRISH BASKET

1 Bottle Bailey’s Irish Cream    2 Pints Guiness Stout    2 Irish Coffee Glasses    1 Box McCann’s Irish Oatmeal    1  Box Twinings Irish Breakfast Tea     1 Bag of Oatfield Irish Butter Toffee             2 Bags of Tayto Chips    1 Roll of McVites Fruit Shortcake Biscuits     1 Tin Hangover Drops       1 Tin Balynialoe Irish Steak Sauce    2 Packages Imported Cadbury Flake Bars       1 Bar Imported Irish Nestle Crunch Bar         1 LB Irish Butter      1 Loaf Mrs. Driscoll’s Freshly Baked Irish Soda Bread      1 Book of Irish Blessing

ITALIAN BASKET

Tuscan White Soup     Neapolitan Bean Soup     Four Cheese Quatifo Gormaggi                    Rusoto w/ Porcini Mushrooms         Ruasto Garlic SP-Scmaria RA SP -SC                                   2 Spaghetti Noodles       Olive Oil    Gnochi  DiPatate      Pesto Sauce w/Tomato                      Bred Sticks      Taralli         1 Talicn Pretzels       Contuccni       Cannoli Cookie Bits

TEMPTATIONS

14 piece ceramic collection:  Serving  Tray,  2.5-qt Baker,  2 19-oz  Loaf Pans,  2  7-oz Loaf Pans,   4   4-oz Ramekins  and  4 Spreaders   (Ceramic Construction; ceramics are freezer-, microwave-, refrigerator and dishwasher safe; oven safe to 500 degrees) 1 Pumpkin Bread mix                                      6 Dips:    Karma-lized Onion, Sesame Parm Perfection, Spunky Spinach,  Dill-licious Pickle, Cheddar Cheesy Bacon,  Sassy Sweet Pepper.  Just add sour cream or mayonnaise!

GRILL BASKET

1 Aussie Grill     1 BBQ Tool Set        1 Bag Kingsford Charcoal

LATINO BASKET

Arcoiris Gelletas Con Malvavisco  (Marshmellow Cookies)      Café de Olla with Cinnamon Instant Coffee       Caldo Con Sabor De Pollo Bouillon (Chicken)     Caldor Con Sabor de Res Bouillon (beef)    Maria’s Biscuit Cookies     Maravilla Cookies    Mole Mexican Cooking Sauce     Abuelita Hot Chocolate     Nido Instant Milk Shake     La Costena Pickled Jalapeno Peppers         1 Jar of Imported Mexican Mayonesa      Jarritos Orange Soda Pop     Valentina Hot Sauce          1 Kitchen Dish Towel      1 Large Box of Marshmellow Cookies

“I Feel So happy to be able to help the children who beg me for protection.  But so many do not ever come to me.” 

 Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal

Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,

And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them

Francis Pruvecki 11/22/1923

Piotr Samorajski 11/22/1936

Clara S. Zabko 11/22/2014

Elisabeth Zukowski 11/23/1930

Eva Ostrowski 11/23/1933

Paul Pramowski 11/23/1954

Bernard Plaza 11/23/1966

Josephine Wysk 11/24/1981

Stanley Sokolowski 11/24/1998

John Kobera 11/25/1968

Mary F. Mieczkowski 11/25/2006

Joseph Seremeth 11/26/1953

Amelia M. Kozik 11/26/1974

Charles Gloski 11/26/1983

Mary Prohowicz 11/26/1995

Rose M. Bruso 11/26/2005

Theresa A. Ferland 11/26/2017

Janek Caslonzik 11/27/1943

Edward Warchol 11/27/1962

Marcianna Brzozowy 11/27/1969

Vernon C. Murray 11/27/1985

Helen Rudinski 11/27/1987

Martin E. Yarmac 11/27/2011

Nellie F. Kosewicz 11/27/2014

Emilia ‘Mildred’ Osciak 11/27/2018

Peter Orzulak 11/28/1935

Frank G. Pipione, Jr. 11/28/1975

Frank J. Mlecko, Jr. 11/28/1977

Alexander Zywna 11/28/1986

Nellie Dudzinski 11/28/1991

John Skrowron 11/29/1951

Caroline Dlugosz 11/29/1966

Sabina P. Kendrow 11/29/1997

Hermine F. Stafford 11/29/1999

Harold McCormick 11/29/2018

PLEASE REMEMBER TO PRAY FOR THE HOLY SOULS

______________________________________________

CONFESSIONS:  Please note that Confessions are being heard in the Confessional:

Tuesday – Friday:   4:45 – 5:15 pm

Monday & Saturday: 7:15 – 7:45 am

Sunday: 7:15 – 7:45 a.m. & 9:45 am – 10:15 am

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Fr. O’ConnorFr. GoniDeacon RattéDeacon BucciOur SeminariansDeacon BeteFr. Campoli

+ CHRISTUS VINCIT! CHRISTUS REGNAT! CHRISTUS IMPERAT!

This Bulletin is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies+

Bulletin: November 15, 2020

+JMJ+

+ Parish Schedule for the Week November 15, 2020+

Sunday, November 15:  Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

    8:00 am + Lauren and Jeffrey Tela – int. Mom and Dad

 10:30 am – Living and Deceased Members of the Saint Cecilia Choir

Monday, November 16:[Saint Margaret of Scotland/Saint Gertrude, Virgin/Our Lady of Vilna]:  

    8:00 am – Grace & Blessings for President Donald Trump – int. Ron & Monica Scherman

Tuesday, November 17: [St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious/Blessed Salome of Galicia]:

   5:30 pm + Barbara Mullins – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

Wednesday, November 18: [Dedication of the Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles/

   Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne/Blessed Karolina Kalinowska]:

   5:30 pm + Parda Family – int. Donald Parda

Thursday, November 19: 

    5:30 pm + Anita Horne – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

Friday, November 20:

    5:30 pm + Joseph and Helen Kostecki – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

Saturday, November 21: [The Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary][Blessed Maria of Jesus]

   8:00 am – Fr. Bruno & All Living and Deceased Members of the St. Joseph Chapter of the

                    Discalced Carmelites Secular

   4:00 pm + Chris and Cecelia Gloski – int. Joyce Phillips

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, November 22: Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

    8:00 am + Paul Angus – int. Anne Jarvis

 10:30 am + Jackie Horne – int. Marlene Kostecki Kostka

 11:15 am – Christ the King Devotions

+ KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIĘ ZA NAMI +

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16th is the Feast of St. Margaret of Scotland and St. Gertrude.  St. Margaret was a mother and queen.  She helped root out paganism.  Her love for the poor became legendary.  She is the Patroness of Scotland.  St. Gertrude, called “the Great” was a Benedictine mystic of the great Benedictine abbey of Helfta in Saxony and wrote on the meaning of suffering, the Sacred Heart, the Trinity, and God’s love.  Her most important work was The Herald of Divine Love.  She fostered devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and His gracious love.  Both saints will be remembered in the Mass at 8:00 a.m.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRlFk5KX4m7gHc32fZbuszoYnVq4Slo9IfhVseRbk9l-Ri9yuC3ljNLIoY5lHU&usqp=CAc

NOVEMBER 16th is the Feast of Our Lady of Vilna.  This holy icon of Our Lady is located in a chapel in the tower of an ancient main gate of the city.  Those who wish to petition Our Lady kneel in the street in order to see the beautiful icon overhead.  Often hundreds are seen kneeling on the stone pavements and in deep prayer giving witness to the strong faith of the people.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17this the feast of St. Elizabeth of Hungary.  Born in 1207, Elizabeth was the daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary. She grew up a very religious child and married Ludwig, the king of Thuringia (in Germany), when she was only 14. The two worked at their marriage. They respected one another. They loved their three children.
As king, Ludwig ruled fairly. As queen, Elizabeth built two hospitals to help her people. She washed and bandaged the sores of lepers. Each day, she gave thick crusty bread—warm from the oven—to hundreds of poor people. Then Ludwig marched off to fight in the Crusades. (The Catholic Church fought these wars to win back the Holy Land.) While away, he died of the plague. Elizabeth, who was only 20, was heartbroken. The new king thought she had given too much of the kingdom’s money to the poor, so he forced her to leave her castle and enter a convent. She had to leave her children behind. When Ludwig’s friends returned from the Crusades, they made the new king change his mind. Elizabeth got to come home to the castle and her children. Her uncle tried to force her to marry again, but she had vowed that if anything happened to her husband, she would only serve God. She helped build a hospital and devoted herself to caring for the sick. Elizabeth wore herself out with her good works, and in 1231, at the age of only 23, she died. Money and fame had never been important to her. She treasured her husband, her children, and God. That is why the Church honors her as a saint. Because she gave so much life-giving bread to the

hungry,Elizabeth is the patron saint of bakers.C:\Users\Kate\Desktop\Elizabeth_of_Hungary-212x300.jpg

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th is the Feast of the Dedication of the Churches of Sts. Peter and Paul and the Feast of St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, who founded the first American House of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and opened the first American free school west of the Mississippi.  Known for her courage and desire to serve Native Americans she was called by them “the woman who prays always.”  The Feast of the Dedication of the Basilicas of Sts. Peter and Paul and St. Rose Philippine Duchesne will be celebrated in the Mass at 5:30 pm.

THE WEEKLY ST. JUDE NOVENA takes place on Wednesday, November 18th at the 5:30 p.m. Mass.  All are invited to take advantage of this opportunity to enlist the help of the saint of impossible cases.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21st is the Feast of the Presentation of Mary in the Temple.  Each year on November 21, both Catholic and Orthodox churches celebrate the Presentation of the Virgin Mary in the Temple (also known as The Entry of the Most Holy Theotokos into the Temple). While originally this day marked the dedication of a basilica in Jerusalem, it quickly became associated with this extra-biblical event, not found in the New Testament.  The feast is based on an ancient text from the year 145, called The Protoevangelium of Jamesa text that was revered by the early Christians. In it, we find the Virgin Mary’s parents entrusting her to the Jewish Temple at an early age.  According to Fr. Alban Butler, this was a custom of some Jewish parents at the time, “Religious parents never fail by devout prayer to consecrate their children to the divine service and love, both before and after their birth. Some amongst the Jews, not content with this general consecration of their children, offered them to God in their infancy, by the hands of the priests in the temple, to be lodged in apartments belonging to the temple, and brought up in attending the priests and Levites in the sacred ministry.”  While the historicity of the document has been questioned, the event has always been a day for religious men and women to consecrate themselves to God, in imitation of the Virgin Mary.

PRESENTATION OF THE VIRGIN TO THE TEMPLE

IN ACCORDANCE with the requirements of the Diocesan Synodal Statues (#209:1), following NEXT Sunday’s 10:30 a.m. Mass of Christ the King we will have Exposition, the Litany of the Sacred Heart, the Act of Consecration and Benediction.

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, November 15: 8:00 – Birthday Blessings for Joe Brian Silva – int. Babci

Sunday, November 15: 10:30 – Chet Galvis – int. Family

Monday, November 16: 8:00 – 29th Anniversary Blessing for Carol and Joe Silva – int. Babci

tuesday, November 17: 5:30 +Louis A. Kozloski – int. Mother

wednesday, November 18:  5:30 + Gert Woodard – int. Wanda Kozloski

thursday, November 19: 5:30 — Health, Blessings for Michael Kozloski – int. Mother 

Friday, November 20: 5:30 – Health, Blessings for Suzanne Kozloski – int. Mother

Saturday, November 21: 8:00 – Souls in Purgatory – int. Betty Fritz

Saturday, November 21: 4:00 – Living & Deceased Members of the Desreuisseau Family – 

                                                         int. Robert Pietraszek

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać

RAFFLE TICKETS FOR GIFT BASKET FUNDRAISER ARE AVAILABLE! 

As you know, because of the recent Pandemic, we have been unable to conduct our seasonal Bazaars, Pumpkin Festival, Tag Sale, 50/50 raffles etc. which has impacted our ability to generate needed income to meet parish expenses.  The Parish Council is sponsoring a fundraiser to help make up for some of our losses.  Raffle tickets will be sold for the next few weeks for a Gift Basket Fundraiser.  There are 9 differently themed baskets that you can be eligible to win.  Pictures of the baskets are in the front vestibule.  Tickets will be 1 for $10.00 or 3 for $20.00.  We hope you can take part in this fundraiser and help support our wonderful parish!

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Kathi Hoszkiewicz for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

HELP AND SACRAMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SICK AND HOMEBOUND – If you know of anyone who is sick or homebound in need of the Sacraments or who needs assistance with errands, please notify the rectory at 413-863-4748.

Milites Templi Revertetur

Soldiers of the Temple Return

     Our parish has always been blessed with altar servers of the highest caliber. The Milites Templi, Our Lady of Czestochowa’s altar server corps, has served our parish well for many years but, due to Covid-19, had to take a hiatus. Now is the time for a comeback!

     The Milites Templi is actively recruiting! We invite you to prayerfully discern if God is calling you to serve at His altar. THIS SUNDAY, November 15th at 10:00 we will have an informational meeting in the church to let you know what would be expected of you and what you can expect from us and each other.

     Remember, while serving on the altar is a wonderful method of vocational discernment, it is also an apostolate unto itself. As such this is an opportunity open to all men of faith. Adults and adolescents alike are welcome in this ministry. It is a beautiful opportunity for fathers and sons to grow closer to God and each other by serving side by side during the Sacrifice of the Mass. However, men can also serve without sons and youths can serve without their fathers.

     So, if you are a man, teen, or boy who has made his first communion and would like to explore what it means to be a member of the Milites Templi, to serve at the altar, in direct service to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament contact Rob Demers. You can speak to him after Mass or email robertmdemers@gmail.com

GROCERIES ARE ALWAYS NEEDED for those who often come to the Rectory.  Currently, we are low on pasta sauce for an overabundance of pasta we’ve received.  Pancake mixes & syrups, peanut butter, jellies, cereals, and canned raviolis are favorites!  Any non-perishables are very helpful! Bóg wam wielki zapłć!

“The rich man who gives to the poor does not bestow alms but pays a debt.”
– St Ambrose of Milan

PRAY FOR VOCATIONS to the Priesthood from our Parish and for our Parish so that we might always have a Priest here to celebrate the Mass and administer the Holy Sacraments!  Please join in the Divine Mercy Chaplet to pray for vocations to the priesthood every Friday beginning at 4:45 p.m.

THE TERESIANS – Please consider becoming a Teresian.  As we have said there is NO commitment.  We will notify everyone on the ministry list (via email) when someone is sick and in need of prayer or a visit OR dying and in need of prayer or a visit OR died and the funeral details.  It will be up to each individual/family to decide how they can minister.  No one is expected to respond to each need. If any parishioner knows of someone in need, please email Nancy Faller (nafaller@aol.com), so we can get the word out.

THIRTY-THIRD SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME: “DICIT DOMINUS”
PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00 & 10:30

The Lord said: I think thoughts of peace and not of affliction.  You will call upon me, and I will answer you, and I will lead back your captives from every place.

(Jeremiah 29:11, 12, 14; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

GRADUAL

10:30

You saved us, O Lord, from our foes, and those who hated us you put to shame. V. In God we glories day by day; your name we praise always.

(Psalm 43:8, 9; Graduale Romanum, Complete English Propers for the High Mass, Rev. Paul Arbogast)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

Out of the depths have I cried to you, O Lord; Lord, hear my voice. Out of the depths have I cried to you, O Lord.

(Psalm 129:1-2; Graduale Romanum, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

COMMUNION

4:00, 8:00, & 10:30

To be near God is my happiness, to place my hope in God the Lord.

(Psalm 72:28, Roman Missal, Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

THIS SUNDAY is the last numbered Sunday before Advent (the 34th Sunday always being preempted by the Solemnity of Christ the King), and so having come through All-hallowtide, wherein we rejoiced with the Saints in heaven, and petitioned for the holy souls in Purgatory, we prepare ourselves in earnest for the Second Coming of Christ the King of the Universe.  The Mass this weekend reminds us of the ‘lasting happiness’ that is our goal (cf. Collect & Gospel) and of the importance of preparedness for that dread day (cf. Second Reading).

The Propers for this Sunday’s Mass, with the exception of the Communion Antiphon, are those of the 23rd Sunday after Pentecost—that which was the last Sunday in the Old Calendar.  The Introit is taken from the Book of the Prophet Jeremiah, and speaks of the compassion of the Lord: “I think thoughts of peace, and not affliction”, as well as the return of the “captives from every place”: This speaks not only literally to the Jews during the Babylonian Exile, but also, by extension, to all men from the captivity of Satan to the New Jerusalem, the Church, and further, to all Christians who are called from their earthly Exile to the New and Eternal Jerusalem.  This chant is set in the Sixth Mode (Hypolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Counsel, and is considered by the Mediaeval theorist Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050) to be ‘devout’; Juan de Espinosa-Medrano (1632-1688) considers this mode to be ‘tearful’—apropriate for those in exile.  The optional Psalm-verse is taken from Pslam 84: the principal Pslam used during Advent, which is fitting, since in most of the Western Church until the 12th or 13th centuries Advent had seven weeks rather than four—and it is possible that the old propers of the 21st through 23rd Sundays after Pentecost, which are very eschatological in outlook, were those once used for the first three weeks of a seven-week Advent.

The Gradual, sung only at the 10:30 Mass, is a simple setting of the text.  It is set in the Third Mode (Phrygian), which is connected with the Gift of Piety, and which is considered the ‘mystic’ mode by d’Arezzo.  The text, from Psalm 43, recalls the work of our Redemption, when Christ, by His death and resurrection, ‘saved us from our enemies’.  This isn’t so much a commentary on the readings, but rather a continuation of the theme of redemption begun in the Introit and the Collect.

Turning to the Offertory Responsory, we have a setting of a portion of Psalm 129, the De profundis, which is found throughout the Office and Mass of the Dead.  This chant is in the Second Mode (Hypodorian), which is connected with the Gift of Fear of the Lord, and is also considered by d’Arezzo, Adam von Fulda (1445-1505), and Espinosa to be ‘sad’.  It is not only the voice of the Church calling to the Lord to rescue us from our exile: a cry which we know will be answered (cf. Introit), but also a reminder, following, as it does, so closely after All-hallowtide, to continue to pray for the dead, who cannot pray for themselves, that they may be freed from their captivity of purgation to enter gloriously into Heaven.

The Communion Antiphon sets a text from Psalm 72, which reminds us of what our goal in life is: ‘To be near God’.  This chant is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Widsom; and is called the ‘perfect’ mode by d’Arezzo, and which Espinosa describes as ‘very happy’.  This text is found not in the Graduale Romanum—and hence, not in the pre-Concilliar books—but in the 1969 Roman Missal for the Novus Ordo, where it is one of several options.

Under normal circumstances, the 10:30 Mass this Sunday would have been the annual Choral Mass for St. Cecilia’s Day, sung by the St. Cecilia Choir, however, because of the restrictions currently in place, this will not be happening.  Instead, the setting of the Ordinary will be a composite setting of Chants from the Kyriale.  The Kyrie is from Mass XI (for the Sundays of Ordinary Time), known by the incipit (first words) of the Trope formerly sung: Orbis factor: ‘Maker of the world’, which dates from the 10th Century, and is in the First Mode.  It is a very common chant in the Manuscript tradition, having many variant forms, the most common of which dates from the 14th to 16th Centuries.  The Gloria is the setting form Mass XV, the Mode IV chant which is considered the earliest setting of the text—the setting in the Kyriale dates from the 10th Century.  The Sanctus and Agnus Dei are those from Mass XVII, and date from the 11th and 13th Centuries, respectively; both chants are in Mode V.  While Mass XVII is suggested for the Sundays of Advent and Lent in the 1908 chant books (the edition of the chant as restored by the Benedictine Monks of Solesmes at the direction of Pope St. Pius X), in many chant traditions, including those of the Cistercian Rite and the pre- and post-Tridentine Roman Rite, the Sanctus and Agnus Dei of this Mass were grouped together with Kyrie Orbis factor for use during Ordinary Time.  The translation of the text of the Kyrie Trope is found below:

Vs. 1. Maker of the world, King eternal, have mercy upon us. 2. O great King of pity, have mercy upon us. 3. Drive off all our evils: have mercy upon us. 4. Christ, who art the light of the world and giver of life, have mercy upon us. 5. Consider the wounds produced by the devil’s art: have mercy upon us. 6. Confirming and keeping thy believers, have mercy upon us. 7. We know that God is one and three; have mercy upon us. 8. Thou and thy Father, an equal light, have mercy upon us. 9. Thou, merciful unto us, be present with the Paraclete that we might live in thee: have mercy upon us. 

Abortion in Poland ‘is used by the extreme Left for cultural revolution’

‘I think when it comes to the involvement of young people on the Left side of the political spectrum, we see more engagement on LGBTQ issues, and then the pro-choice movement,’ said Polish pro-life leader Jakub Baltroszewicz.

Featured Image

November 7, 2020 (LifeSiteNews) — If the world were not transfixed by the unfolding electoral disaster in the United States, all eyes would be fixed on Poland. On October 22, the nation’s top court ruled that eugenic abortions — those performed on pre-born children with fatal fetal abnormalities — were unconstitutional.

There are only around 1,000 abortions each year in Poland, which already has very restrictive abortion laws, and nearly all of them are procured for this reason. To the shock of Law and Justice (PiS), the conservative ruling party, the country promptly exploded.

There have been days of protests, with over 100,000 marching in Warsaw last Friday. Aerial photos show an ocean of people converging in the streets, with COVID-19 restrictions still ostensibly limiting groups to only five. By Tuesday, over half a million people had joined the protests, the largest street rallies since the Solidarity protests that toppled Communism. Armies of police officers were deployed to protect the homes of politicians, including deputy prime minister Jarosław Kaczyński’s residence, as well as churches, which almost immediately became flashpoints for angry crowds. Protestors stormed services, calling for congregants to “pray for abortion for all.”

In response, Polish president Andrzej Duda filed amendments to the abortion law to soften the court ruling, but protestors are demanding a complete repeal of the judgement. One European media outlet referred to the protests as “the abortion revolution,” and it is not clear they will end anytime soon.

Jakub Baltroszewicz is the president of the Polish Federation of Pro-Life and Pro-Family Movements, which was founded in 1993 and is the oldest and largest pro-life umbrella organization in the country, with thirty members. He told me that while abortion was legal for a short time in 1996-97 for “social circumstances,” that law was ruled to be unconstitutional, but from the early 2000s there was a steady uptick in eugenic abortions, which now account for the majority of terminations (1074 of 1116 in 2019.)

To respond to this, several citizens’ initiatives were introduced by the pro-life movement to ban or further limit abortion, with the most recent “Stop Abortion” petition garnering 800,000 signatures in a country of 38 million. A parliamentary commission was supposed to examine the issue, but when they failed to do so, 119 pro-life parliamentarians submitted a request to the Constitutional Tribunal in December of 2019, asking them to examine whether eugenic abortion was constitutional.

After ten months, the Tribunal ruled that it was not — and the protests began in earnest. Almost immediately, Baltroszewicz told me, progressive political parties seized on the protests as an opportunity to confront the ruling Law and Justice and shifted from demanding that the Tribunal’s decision be repealed to demanding abortion “up until birth” as well as the resignation of the government.

“Some conservative organizations started to protect churches in a military-like manner by creating cordons,” Baltroszewicz told me. “Left-wing media tried to heat up the atmosphere in any way possible. At this point, rational dialogue was not possible. It was not about abortion anymore, not about compromise, not about freedom. We also see that the protest is ‘fashionable’ among young people, who are tired of COVID restrictions and feel that they are part of a fight for freedom and don’t want to stay behind and look old-fashioned. Lots of these people do not have strong pro-life or pro-choice convictions but have been manipulated into thinking that they are part of a historical revolution. The Catholic, pro-life president panicked and called for a compromise law.”

“The intention,” Baltroszewicz explained, “was to allow abortion only for lethal cases when we are sure that the child will not survive more than hours or days after birth but ban, for example, abortions on children with Down syndrome. Unfortunately, the proposal was badly written under tremendous pressure from the crowd. What is even worse is that the ruling of the Constitutional Tribunal was not yet published, although the deadline was November 2. It is clearly an egregious violation of Polish law and I am shocked the Government decided on such a move. Can you imagine a situation where any Government disagrees with the ruling of the Supreme Court of its country under tremendous pressure from protests and decides not to publish it so it cannot become law as if the ruling never happened? We are clearly in a deep political crisis and our conservative government is in full panic mode.”

While the international press is presenting the protests as an abortion revolution, Baltroszewicz says the ruling was only a flashpoint, and that young people in Poland generally don’t feel strongly about abortion either way.  Abortion, however, “is used by the extreme Left for cultural revolution and has become a kind of symbol to change the social structure and mentality. Poland is one of the few countries in Europe that still has strong Christian and conservative values, and some people simply cannot stand that as they hate everything that represents these values. If you look at countries like France, Spain, Ireland, or Malta — one or two generations ago, they were as Christian and conservative Poland, and what happened? This is a revolution, and the Tribunal ruling was a good moment to introduce it to our country.”

“I think when it comes to the involvement of young people on the Left side of the political spectrum, we see more engagement on LGBTQ issues, and then the pro-choice movement, although both support each other.”

The pro-life movement isn’t giving up. Baltroszewicz says the short-term goal is to “manage a current crisis caused not only by the protests, but also by the president’s proposal and the refusal to publish the Tribunal ruling. We still hope the ruling will be respected in its entirety, but if the politicians decide that compromise is required, all we can do is try to introduce proposals from the pro-life side. We really hope the situation will calm down and left-wing extremists stop using abortion for cultural revolution, but I don’t think that will happen … Our long-term goal is to build a culture of life in Poland. It is needed especially for families who have children with disabilities or illness.”

“If eugenic abortion will be banned or limited, we must prove that these families are well taken care of not only by us but by the State. We need appropriate financial support for them, we need easy access to rehabilitation, they need to feel safe and supported as raising a child with illness or disabilities may be challenging. If we want abortion — especially eugenic abortion — to stop, we must prove as a society, as a State, that we take a good care of all our children and especially vulnerable ones. Only then, I believe, will abortion become — like slavery or racial segregation — a nightmare of the past times.”

In the meantime, pro-lifers are also advocating for introducing free pre-natal hospices with a mandatory requirement that women be informed that they need not choose abortion but can instead choose hospice and palliative care for their children.

“This will give the child the possibility of passing away without any pain, and the possibility of being held by parents who can say their goodbyes and plan a proper funeral,” Baltroszewicz told me. “A child is not medical waste. If we cannot do anything to save the child’s life, at least we can give them the dignity of a painless, human death.”

ALTERNATIVES PREGNANCY CENTER – Pregnancy Tests, Counseling, Support Services, and Post Abortion Support, All Services Free and Confidential, 466 Main Street, P.O. Box 344, Greenfield, MA  01302-0344 — (413) 774-6010

OFFICE OF VOCATIONS: “Love never fails.”  Trust the love of God and follow your heart. (1 Corinthians 12:31-13:4-13) If you think God is calling you, please email: vocations@diospringfield.org and/or visit our website: http://www.myvocation.com

2020 ANNUAL CATHOLIC APPEAL.  Thank you to all those who have made a gift or pledge to “Our Faith, Our Future”.  Your gift will make a difference in someone’s life and will share God’s mercy message in a tangible way.  As of November 1st we have received gifts from 82 donors who have pledged/contributed $8,715.00 which is 87% of the way toward our goal of $10,000! If you have not made a donation, it’s not too late!!  Prayerfully consider a gift. More envelopes are on their way and will be found in the front vestibule.   No contribution, no act of charity is ever too small or insignificant.  Thank you.

HE WAITS FOR YOU – Please consider spending time with Our Lord in Eucharistic Adoration to make reparation to His Sacred Heart.  We have exposition of the Blessed Sacrament from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. Tuesday – Friday   and from 5:00 – 6:00 pm on Saturdays.  Sign-up sheets are in the front vestibule if you would like to commit to covering an hour.

Check out our website at:  www.chroniclesofczestochowa.wordpress.com

Sunday Mass is live-streamed at 8:00 am

Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,

And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them.

Eleonore Podlenski 11/16/1929

Anthony Pluta 11/16/1986

Stanislaus Traceowski 11/17/1944

Wanda Bogusz 11/17/1980

Joseph V. Skrzykpek 11/17/2005

John Jarmak 11/18/1962

Joseph Jablonski 11/18/1967

Raymond K. George 11/18/2013

Sophie Plaza 11/19/1978

Viliam Haurlent 11/19/1999

Vivian M. (Pat) Martin 11/19/2004

Andrew Zolynski 11/20/1928

Sigmund Podlenski 11/20/1967

Antonina Kestyn 11/20/1969

Irene Dejnak 11/20/1973

Mary Kuminski 11/20/1982

Joseph J. Kozloski 11/20/1995

Mary Jablonski 11/21/1940

John Duda 11/21/1947

Lucy Dejnak 11/21/1967

Michelle Noga 11/21/1973

Joseph Marszalek 11/21/1974

Frank Waraksa 11/21/1986

Stanley A. Mieczkowski, Jr. 11/21/2006

Francis Pruvecki 11/22/1923

Piotr Samorajski 11/22/1936

Clara S. Zabko 11/22/20

CONFESSIONS:  Please note that Confessions are being heard in the Confessional:

Tuesday – Friday:   4:45 – 5:15 pm

Monday, Saturday & Sunday: 7:15 – 7:45 am

Sunday: 9:45 am – 10:15 am

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Msgr. YargeauBishop McDonnellClergy in PurgatoryDeacon LearyFr. RoachOur Retired PriestsFr. Lisowski

+ CHRISTUS VINCIT! CHRISTUS REGNAT! CHRISTUS IMPERAT!  +
THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies

Bulletin: November 8, 2020

+JMJ+

+ Parish Schedule for the Week November 8, 2020+

Sunday, November 8:  Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

    8:00 am + All Souls Novena VIII

 10:30 am + All Souls Novena IX

Monday, November 9: [The Dedication of the Lateran Basilica]:  

    8:00 am + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Melissa Wright

Tuesday, November 10: [St. Leo the Great, Pope and Doctor of the Church]:

   5:30 pm + Susan Fitzpatrick – int. Dorothy Weldon

Wednesday, November 11: [Saint Martin of Tours, Bishop][Bl. Alicia (Maria Jadwiga) Kotowska]:

   5:30 pm + Helen Bush – int. George Bush

Thursday, November 12 [Saint Josephat, Bishop and Martyr] [Five Polish Brothers]

    5:30 pm + Rosaline St. Hilaire – int. Sandy Misiun

Friday, November 13 [Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin] [St. Stanislaus Kostka]:

    5:30 pm + Mr. and Mrs. Walter Krynzel – int. Dorothy Kosewicz

Saturday, November 14: 

   8:00 am – Health & Blessings Allison and Paul Edwards – int. Ron & Monica Scherman

   4:00 pm +Linda Hicks – Uncle Joz

   6:00 pm – Spanish Mass – int. for our Parish and Parishioners

Sunday, November 15: Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time:

    8:00 am + Lauren and Jeffrey Tela – int. Mom and Dad

 10:30 am – Living and Deceased Members of the St. Cecelia’s Choir

+ KRÓLOWO POLSKI MÓDL SIĘ ZA NAMI +

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9th is the Feast of the Dedication of St. John Lateran, which is the Cathedral of the Pope as Bishop of Rome.  It is known as the Mother Church of Christendom and it serves as a sign of devotion to, and of unity with, the Pope who “presides over the whole assembly in charity.”  The Mass of the Dedication of St. John Lateran will take place at the 8:00 a.m. Mass.Nov 10 - St Leo the Great, (1) pope and doctor of the Church (400-461) -  Catholicireland.netCatholicireland.net

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10th is the Feast of Pope St. Leo the Great, known as a great Pastor, preacher and defender of Roman primacy.  He is also known for having twice saved the city of Rome from Barbarian invasions.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11th is the Feast of St. Martin of Tours, a soldier turned Christian who later became a Monk and a Bishop.  Known for his great charity he will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12th is the Feast of St. Josaphat, a Polish nobleman and bishop who led the Ukrainian Eastern Rite Church in eastern Poland.  His fidelity to Rome and his desire for union between the Orthodox Church and the Roman Church led to his martyrdom.  His tomb as the patron of Christian unity is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome.  He will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

NOVEMBER 12th IS THE FEAST of the five Polish brothers, St. Benedict, St. John, St. Matthew, St. Isaac and St. Christian.  The five established a monastery at Kazimierz near Gniezno.  On November 11th in 1003 they were all murdered by pagan robbers.  They were all immediately venerated as martyrs and their holy relics were solemnly taken to Olomuc.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th is the Feast of St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, the first U.S. Citizen to be canonized.  She labored establishing schools, hospitals and orphanages throughout North and South America.  She will be remembered in the Mass at 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13th is also the Feast of St. Stanislaw Kostka who the Church declares “was made perfect in a short while and fulfilled many times by the Angelic innocence of his life.”  St. Stanislaw was the second son of John and Margaret Kostka, senator of Poland.  St. Stanislaw wanted to join the Jesuit order but because of the strong and violent objections of his family he fled Poland at the age of seventeen and walked to Rome to enter the order so that his powerful family could do no harm to the Jesuits in Poland.  St. Stanislaus led a life of pure faith, obedience and love as a novice in the order.  A year later he fell ill.  On being taken to his bed he made a sign of the cross over it, saying that he would never more rise from it.  Shortly thereafter he looked up from his bed and whispered that he saw the Blessed Virgin accompanied with many angels and quietly died.  St. Stanislaus is one of the national patrons of Poland as well as the patron of youth the world over.

Saint Stanislaus Kostka | The Society of Jesus

GIFT BASKET FUNDRAISER FOR OUR PARISH – As you know, because of the recent Pandemic, we have been unable to conduct our seasonal Bazaars, Pumpkin Festival, Tag Sale, 50/50 raffles etc. which has impacted our ability to generate needed income to meet parish expenses.  So, next weekend, 11/14 and 11/15, the Parish Council is sponsoring a fundraiser to help make up for some of our losses.  Raffle tickets will be sold for a Gift Basket Fundraiser.  There are 6 differently themed baskets that you can be eligible to win.  Pictures of the baskets are in the front vestibule.  Tickets will be 1 for $10.00 or 3 for $20.00.  We hope you can take part in this fundraiser and help support our wonderful parish!

Milites Templi Revertetur

Soldiers of the Temple Return

     Our parish has always been blessed with altar servers of the highest caliber. The Milites Templi, Our Lady of Czestochowa’s altar server corps, has served our parish well for many years but, due to Covid-19, had to take a hiatus. Now is the time for a comeback!

     The Milites Templi is actively recruiting! We invite you to prayerfully discern if God is calling you to serve at His altar. On Sunday,  November 15th at 10:00 we will have an informational meeting in the church to let you know what would be expected of you and what you can expect from us and each other.

     Remember, while serving on the altar is a wonderful method of vocational discernment, it is also an apostolate unto itself. As such this is an opportunity open to all men of faith. Adults and adolescents alike are welcome in this ministry. It is a beautiful opportunity for fathers and sons to grow closer to God and each other by serving side by side during the Sacrifice of the Mass. However, men can also serve without sons and youths can serve without their fathers.

     So, if you are a man, teen, or boy who has made his first communion and would like to explore what it means to be a member of the Milites Templi, to serve at the altar, in direct service to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament contact Rob Demers. You can speak to him after Mass or email robertmdemers@gmail.com.

THIRTY-SECOND SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME: “INTRET ORATIO”

PROPER OF THE MASS: TEXTS AND A MEDITATION ON THE CHANTS

INTROIT (ENTRANCE CHANT)

8:00 & 10:30

Let my prayer come into your presence.  Incline your ear to my cry for help, O Lord.

(Psalm 87:3, 2; Graduale Romanum/Roman Missal, The Proper of the Mass for Sundays and Solemnities, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

GRADUAL

10:30

Let my prayer come like incense before you, O Lord. V/. The lifting up of my hands, like the evening sacrifice.

(Ps. 140:2; Graduale Romanum, adapted Henry Gaida)

OFFERTORY

8:00 & 10:30

Direct my steps, O Lord, according to your word, and let no iniquity have dominion over me, O Lord my God.

(Ps. 118:113; Graduale Romanum, The Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B.)

COMMUNION

4:00 & 8:00

The Lord is my shepherd, there is nothing I shall want.  Fresh and green are the pastures where he gives me repose, near restful water he leads me.

(Ps. 22:1-2; Roman Missal/Graduale Romanum, The Proper of the Mass, Fr. Samuel Weber, O.S.B)

10:30

The five wise virgins took oil in flasks with their lamps; at midnight there was a cry: “Behold, the bridegroom is here; come out to meet Christ the Lord.”

(Matthew 25:4-6; Graduale Romanum, Simple English Propers, Adam Bartlett)

THE Mass this Sunday, coming as it often does immediately after the Solemnity of All Saints on the 1st of November and the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed (All Souls) on the 2nd, focuses our attention on our prepartaion for a holy death and on the Second Coming of Christ—looking toward the coming Solemnity of Christ the King.

As with many of the Sunday Mass formularies between the 28th and 33rd Sundays of Ordinary Time, the Church has chosen the chants of this Sunday from various Masses found in the pre-Conciliar books.  The Introit (Entrance Chant) of this Sunday’s Mass is taken from the Mass of the Saturday of Ember Week in Lent—one of four times prescribed by the Church for special penitential observances, prayers for peace, and so on, roughly occuring at the commencement of the four Seasons—setting a passage from Psalm 87 (88 in the Masoretic numbering) beseeching the Lord to hear our prayers, appropriate for the commencement of the Mass.  This chant is in the Third Mode (Phrygian), which is connected, appropriately, with the Gift of Piety: the Mediaeval theorist Guido d’Arezzo (995-1050) calls this mode “mystic”, and Adam von Fulda (1445-1505) refers to this mode as “passionat” and “intense”.  

The Gradual sung between the first two readings at the 10:30 Mass sets a passage from Psalm 140 (141), which echoes the theme prayer of the Introit, as well as the Collect of the Mass.  Here, the Gradual functions not so much as a commentary on the Readings, but as a melismatic chant to allow for contemplation.  This chant is in the Seventh Mode (Mixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Understanding; while distinct from the Gift of Wisdom, this complements the first reading from the Book of Wisdom.  (This chant was originally used on the XIX Sunday after Pentecost, and, like the Introit, on Saturday of Ember Week in Lent.)

The Offertory Responsory sets a passage from Psalm 118(119) which is connected with the Collect in which, like the present Offertory, we pray that we be free from all sins of mind and body—this can be connected with the Second Reading and the Gospel, and the need to be prepared for death, i.e., free from sin, so as to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.  This chant is in the Eighth Mode (Hypomixolydian), which is connected with the Gift of Wisdom (c.f., First Reading).  Adam von Fulda connects this mode with knowledge, and Juan de Espinosa Medrano (1632-1688) describes this mode as “very happy”.

The Communion Antiphon from the Roman Missal, sung at the 4:00 and 8:00 Masses, is a setting of the first two verese of Psalm 22(23), “The Lord is my shepherd”, the most common Responsorial Psalm used at funerals, for which this chant is also an option for the Communion Antiphon.  This psalm speaks of the confidence of those who follow the Lord, and, appropriate for a Communion chant, also speaks of “the table of the Lord”.  This chant is in Mode II (Hypodorian), which is connected with the Gift of Fear of the Lord.

    At the 10:30 Mass, the Communion Antiphon is an option from the Gradual Romanum for Year A, which is a direct quotation from today’s Gospel.  This chant is in the Fifth Mode (Lydian), which is connected with the Gift of Fortitude; Guido, Fulda, and Medrano all refer to this mode as “happy”, reflecting the joy of those who, prepared ‘to meet the Lord’, enter the blessedness of Heaven with the Saints, whose great Feast we just celebrated.

At the 10:30 Mass the Ordinary setting will be Mass II from the Kyriale Romanum, known by the Trope of the Kyrie: Kyrie fons bonitatis.  The Kyrie, which dates from the X. century, is in the Third Mode (Phrygian), and is a wonderful example of word-painting: The Trope begins: ‘Lord, fountain of goodness’, and these ‘fountains’ can be heard in the gentle downward melismas of each line.  The Gloria dates from the XIII. century, and is in the First Mode (Dorian), and tends to stay in the very uppermost part of the range, reaches the very highest notes at “Glorificamus te” (We glorify thee), and again at “Tu solus Altissimus” (Thou only art the Most High).  The Sanctus is also in the First Mode, and dates from between the XII. and XIII. centuries.  The Agnus Dei is from the X. century, and while also in the First Mode, this chant stays in the lower part of the range.

OUR LADY’S HOLY ICON will visit the home of Monica Scherman for a week of prayer and petition for the needs of our Parish.  We thank you for this holy work of power and love.

HELP AND SACRAMENTS AVAILABLE FOR SICK AND HOMEBOUND – If you know of anyone who is sick or homebound in need of the Sacraments or who needs assistance with errands, please notify the rectory at 413-863-4748.

Virgins and Vigilance

by: Carl E. Olsonhttps://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/files.catholicworldreport.com/2018/04/christ_threevirgins-678x380.jpg

A first-century Jewish wedding began after nightfall. The bridesmaids, after spending time with the bride, would go out to meet the bridegroom. Since it was dark, they would carry some sort of light, either an oil lamp or a torch made of oil-soaked rags. They would then escort the bridegroom to the bride. The wedding party then made their way through the village, usually taking a long and meandering route in order to share their joy with as many of the townspeople as possible. They eventually went to the bridegroom’s home, where a great banquet awaited all of the family members and guests.

The parable of the ten virgins takes place within this festive and joyful context, yet the final message is a sober exhortation to be properly prepared. The virgins are apparently the bridesmaids who were to escort the bridegroom (along with his bride) to his home and the banquet. They awaited the arrival of the bridegroom, but he was “long delayed”. Why? No reason is given, but the focus is not on the reason for the delay, but on the preparedness of the virgins.

It is striking that all of the virgins “became drowsy and fell asleep”, but that half of them, upon awaking, needed oil. Those five desperately demanded that the five wise virgins share some of the oil they had brought along in case there was a delay. However, if the wise virgins shared the oil, the fuel would be quickly consumed and they would risk meeting the bridegroom without the expected and welcome light.

On another level, the refusal of the wise virgins makes even more sense. The ten virgins are commonly understood to represent disciples of Jesus the Bridegroom. “These five and five virgins are all Christian souls together”, wrote St. Augustine, who said they are souls who “have the Catholic faith and seem to have good works in the church of God.” The oil signifies good works, an interpretation drawn from the connection made by Jesus between the lamp that shines before men and good works (Matt 5:15-16). Augustine, referring to St. Paul’s great reflection on love in 1 Corinthians 13, said the oil signifies charity, “the gift of God”. There is no contradiction between the two, because our good works are nothing without love (cf., 1 Cor 13:1-3). The wise virgins couldn’t give their oil to the foolish virgins because no one can borrow the good works of others to make up for the good works they’ve failed to do. Each person must, Paul wrote, “work out [their] own salvation with fear and trembling” (Phil 2:12).

Augustine further identified the drowsiness and sleep of the virgins with death. This makes sense because chapters 24 and 25 of Matthew’s Gospel are focused on the last things, including final judgment (see Matt 24:3, 13; 25:31ff). In fact, the moment of death is the moment of judgment. “Each man receives his eternal retribution in his immortal soul at the very moment of his death,” states the Catechism of the Catholic Church, “in a particular judgment that refers his life to Christ…” Further, in the words of St. John of the Cross: “At the evening of life, we shall be judged on our love” (par 1022).

Because the five wise virgins were perfected in good works and charity, they “were ready” and so “went into the wedding feast with him.” And then the door was locked. The cry of the foolish virgins—“Lord, Lord…!”—brings further into focus the meaning of true discipleship, for it echoes Jesus’ earlier statement from the Sermon on the Mount: “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven” (Matt 7:21).  In light of this, Jesus said, we must stay awake—that is, be spiritually vigilant and mindful the Bridegroom will indeed come. For now, we live in a “time of waiting and watching” (CCC, 672).

https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2017/11/11/virgins-and-vigilance/

THE FOLLOWING MASS INTENTIONS have been sent to various Missionaries.  They will be offered as follows and you may unite your prayers to the Missionaries who offer the Masses in their churches:

Sunday, November 8: 8:00 + Holy Souls in Purgatory – int. Maureen Filiault

Sunday, November 8: 10:30 + Joan Raughtigan – int. The Shaughnessys

Monday, November 9: 8:00 + Taylor Grogan – int. The Shaughnesys

Tuesday, November 10:  5:30 + Bernie Kobera – int. Mary Kobera

Wednesday, November 11: 5:30 – Grace & Blessings for Jill Mackin Betters – int. Friend

Thursday, November 12:  5:30 + Sophie Ostroski – int. Godchild

Friday, November 13: 5:30 – Health, Grace & Blessings for Mark & Mary LaCroix & Family

                                                 – int. Fritz Family

Saturday, November 14: 8:00 – Health, Grace & Blessings for Mark & Mary LaCroix & Family 

                                                     — int. Fritz Family

Saturday, November 14: 4:00 – Souls in Purgatory – int. Betty Fritz

PLEASE NOTE:  The above Masses not only assist the souls for whom they are offered, but they also help you and the Missionaries who often times receive very little help.  Bóg wam zapłać

Eternal Rest Grant Unto Them O Lord,

And Let Your Perpetual Light Shine Upon Them.

John Cislo 11/8/1930

Rev. Stanislaus A. Szczypinski 11/8/1978

Stanley Sojka 11/8/1980

Sophie M. Lund 11/8/1994

Helen D. Fronckus 11/8/2004

Raymond Sokoloski 11/8/2017

Blanche Ptak 11/9/1983

Dean L. Clark 11/9/1994

Steven Siciak 11/9/1995

Francis Aptacy 11/10/1927

Helen Duda 11/10/1933

Stanislawa Milowski 11/10/1968

Emeline Krejmas 11/10/1985

Albert J. Dlugosz 11/10/1986

Anna M. Kostrzewska 11/10/2003

Frank F. Benedetti 11/10/2012

Boleslaus Ostrowski 11/11/1931

Philip Jarmak 11/11/1943

Wladyslawa Gumula 11/11/1967

Laurence E. Fugere 11/11/2003

Edward F. Greene, Jr. 11/11/2006

Robert G. Larabee, Jr. 11/11/2007

Joseph Sliva 11/12/1983

John H. A. Lane, Jr. 11/12/1999

Caroline J. Janek 11/13/2000

John “Tim” Golembeski 11/13/2014

PLEASE NOTE Please join in dedicating every day to one of the clergymen designated in our calendar.  The intentions for this week are:

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
Vocations/Fr. BermudezClergy who are sickDeacon DeCarloOur Deacon CandidatesFr. DiMascolaDeacon PattenFr. Lunney

+ CHRISTUS VINCIT! CHRISTUS REGNAT! CHRISTUS IMPERAT!  +

THIS BULLETIN is sponsored by the St. Stanislaus and St. Kazimierz Societies